Ford 8N Tractor with Propane Conversion - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Before you do any more work it will be worthwhile checking out the transmission and rear axle. The transmission cover plate can be removed in a few minutes. Check the bottom of the sump with a flashlight and search for broken springs and clutch teeth. The transmission may need to be drained if it still has the dark brown oil.

    The rear axle can be inspected by removing the dip stick circular cover plate. Look for broken bits and rust. A small amount of rust is not a problem. The tractor will clear it off after a few hundred feet of travel. The oil will need to be changed

    If the generator is the three brush type, the sheet metal cover band will need to be removed to access the adjustable brush. The brush is set for roughly 7.5 volts at 1500 RPM. (Check the repair manual) The armature on the generator will also need to be pulsed with the negative battery lead in case it has forgotten what the correct polarity is.

    The voltage regulator needs to match the generator design. The two bush generator uses a different regulator.
    Last edited by Robert R; 09-09-2020 at 12:38 AM.

  2. #22
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    Forgot to update: The tractor is running!


    After the video was taken, I got the front tires back together, switched to a horizontal propane tank mount, and raised the height of the back deck to better clear the hydraulic arms.

    The tractor's been running good. The hydraulics and transmission work great. The front wheel spindles and steering links have a lot of play so I'll be rebuilding those shortly. I've also noticed it's starting to cut out when in low low idle whereas before it would sit and putt without a problem. I need to rebuild the headlight buckets so they'll stay still and ground to the tractor better. I also bought an electric hour meter to install and keep track of run time.

    I've been putting the tractor to work for a few hours every other evening digging out the containment pond. I have a bucket, a middle plow, and a grader blade, but the bucket's been used the most as we had a couple days of rain so I'm taking advantage of the soft ground.

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  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by macgyver View Post

    Also, pay attention to the tank, I think vertical and horizontal have a different pickup system or tube in them so you can't use a vert in place of a horizontal etc. I have vertical and horizontal tank lifts and I keep an extra for each and don't switch them around.
    There is no difference in modern propane cylinders, horizontal or vertical. If you run one horizontal, you just got to orient it where the line-up hole is on the bottom, this puts the dip tube on the bottom of the tank.

  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by gbent View Post
    Would I be an a$$ if you pointed out you have the Atlas lathe of tractors?
    It's true, but it is what it is. For some things they're much handier than a larger tractor. As an orchard tractor with rear mounted forks to place empty bins, then pick up and consolidate them when they're full (700lb), there's really nothing significantly better. It's small and agile, goes places larger tractors can't and has really good visibility of the forks. And the top link can be adjusted from the driver's seat. Modern JDs/Kubotas of the same size are downright clunky by comparison.

    But having mowed with one of these, I would never do it again. No live PTO is a PITA. Overrunning clutch is a mandatory safety feature, but try clearing a jam from a sickle bar mower on an 8N. Argh.

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  7. #25
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    I beg to differ. The Atlas was never more than an excuse for a lathe. The Ford 8 and 9 Ns were more than adequate for their intended tasks. They pretty much, with Ferguson, mechanized the small farm. That so many of them are still at it today, as capable and reliable as when they were new, is quite a feat.

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  9. #26
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    Since the older engines used leaded gas to help lube the valves what happens with propane. Not needed?

    Dave

  10. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by winger View Post
    Since the older engines used leaded gas to help lube the valves what happens with propane. Not needed?

    Dave
    Everything I've read is that because it's a low compression, low HP engine, with hardened valve seats, they run fine on unleaded gas (don't know where you'd even find leaded gas these days), so propane wouldn't be much different. I've read that some guys add modern additives to their fuel for antique engines, but I've never met anyone myself that does. Everyone just runs unleaded and at worst need to lap their valves back into shape every 100,000 miles. I've been running my 53' Chevy Sedan on it for the last 15 years without any issues.


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