Forklift Chassis Design Criterias
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    Question Forklift Chassis Design Criterias

    I'm designing a forklift chassis. Firstly I'm thinking of creating a rectangular prism, then i ll clear out places (for battery,axle etc.). Could you please inform me as detailed as possible about the points that I should pay attention or any suggestions for beginning of the design.

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    Begin with a solid one piece forging. Remove all metals in spaces that don't look like a forklift chassis.


    Quote Originally Posted by Kaang View Post
    I'm designing a forklift chassis. Firstly I'm thinking of creating a rectangular prism, then i ll clear out places (for battery,axle etc.). Could you please inform me as detailed as possible about the points that I should pay attention or any suggestions for beginning of the design.

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    Find the ANSI standards that apply. Follow them.

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    Go to a busy warehouse. Find all the busted forklifts. Analyse what went wrong. Redesign. Assignment for school now done :-)

    L7

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    very little ever goes wrong with a chassis,because they are made so massive.....only fail I can recall was Mitsubishi 8 tonners were too weak over the steer wheel arch ,and used to crack right where the counterweight mounted .....welded up a few of them......In fact forklifts are over engineered to take the worst abuse a brain dead operator can apply........freight depots prefer the brain dead ,they work cheap.

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    You can design a forklift chassid massifly because there are no weight restrictions
    You have to ad weigt anyhow
    Peter

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    Make the rear heavier then the back. Place the engine and transmission to the rear for extra weight back there. Checker cars were designed by going to the junk yards and finding parts that had no demand because they did not break then using those designs. A arms from one make, rear end from another etc.
    Bill D

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kaang View Post
    I'm designing a forklift chassis. Firstly I'm thinking of creating a rectangular prism, then i ll clear out places (for battery,axle etc.). Could you please inform me as detailed as possible about the points that I should pay attention or any suggestions for beginning of the design.
    Are you, though?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cole2534 View Post
    Are you, though?
    I thought we are.....

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    I've got an etch-a-sketch around here somewhere....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    Make the rear heavier then the back. Place the engine and transmission to the rear for extra weight back there. Checker cars were designed by going to the junk yards and finding parts that had no demand because they did not break then using those designs. A arms from one make, rear end from another etc.
    Bill D
    Actually, you don't want the engine in the back. To have the most compact design, you need the engine as far forward as you can get it, and save the back for counterweight. Versa-Lift perfected this by putting the engine beside the operator, and the back is all counterweight. By putting the operator beside the engine, it also lowered the overall height, which helps getting in tight spots.

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    I thought we are.....
    Forklift design is a good topic, but the OP's questions are so basic and vague that there is no way to cover such a broad subject.

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    After WW2 here ,a government body was formed ,to collect up each and every forklift ,own and operate them at very high hourly rates .....a government monopoly.......Forklifts were unobtainable new ,parts were unobtainable ,in the years immediately following WW2......To get around this ,people made their own forklifts from old truck pieces,and even car pieces .....the counterweights were nearly always concrete cast in moulds ,cast around the steel frame that came from a truck or car......A heavy hit on the counterweight would result in a big lump of concrete falling off.

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    I agree with u, i ll put engine as far forward as i can and wanna put all counterweight in back.

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    I remember first trip to car junk yards with my older brother. in then 70's. They had big cadilacs with a cable crane welded into the trunk.

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    If you're looking for design input I would suggest visiting a qualified rigging company that uses forklifts every day. I was with a So Cal rigging company for 13 years and we ran a large fleet of several types of forklifts from 6k capacity to 140k capacity mostly hyster and versa-lifts. The lifts were used and abused on a daily basis. The forklift is a riggers primary tool today and they should have a sense of what would be a good design.

    In my experience our team had a good idea of what would make a good forklift. For example; for rigging purposes the guys preferred the older hyster lifts over the newer ones because the clutch was way easier to engage on older machines making for smoother action especially when handling heavy machinery in all types of conditions.

    We performed most of our maintenance in house and modified them where possible for that type of work such as adding hang on counterweights, mounting points for dollies, heel bars etc. The mechanics had a good handle on the maintenance issues and would know what is problematic.

    Hope this helps.

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    Keep the contact patch of the front tires as far forward as physically possible.


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