Fosdick radial drill move - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    I've moved a few big radials over the years and I always used the method recomended by " Asquith " who as you probably know made radial arm drills. Their method was to lift the drill from the base. I had lifting lugs made for the job that fastened to the base via the tee-slots. I fastened the lifting lugs just off the point of balance away from the column. Drop two chains, one down either side of the arm into the lifting lugs. You need another sling, preferably a soft one that you can choke hitch around the top of the column and back up to the crane hook that your chain sling is in.
    The idea is to rig the lift so the drill falls over slightly lengthwise, a few inches no more, into the soft sling and the chains take the main load. You can alter the lift by moving the head along the arm until the balance is just right.

    Be sure before you begin the lift that the arm and head are securely locked. Also, if you can, ensure that any coolant is pumped out of the base.

    Lift the machine a couple of inches off the floor or truck then go and get a coffee. If the drill is still as you left it when you get back proceed with the lift.

    Regards Tyrone.

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    It has been a while since I posted last but am still making progress. An issue that I would like to address before I move it is the column lock does not hold in the position over the table. If rotated about 90 degrees it will have much more resistance but can still move if pushed on. I will be blocking up and strapping the arm down so this could be seen as not required. I have searched some and can not find how to adjust it and would like to have an idea of what to do before I open it up. I will post more pictures when I get the rigging set up before I pick it. The lock for the head is also not holding as well as it should. Thanks again for all the help.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gebhart View Post
    It has been a while since I posted last but am still making progress. An issue that I would like to address before I move it is the column lock does not hold in the position over the table. If rotated about 90 degrees it will have much more resistance but can still move if pushed on.

    I had an old Fosdick back in a seemingly 'nother lifetime, and it never ran, and other than that - I have little to no experience with radial drills, but Shirley the lock that you are talking about is a sinch type clamp eh? Is there maybe a lever that is turned, and after many years has worn enough on the bottom of the lever and the top of the casting to be "out of travel" and possibly need taken off and a worsher stuffed in there?

    Otherwise I'm thinking that it may be cracked.


    Man, I tell yuh, for all that you seem to have put into this already, and it's not even off the ground yet, I'm thinking that you may be way over your head.
    Add to that a swinging head, and I'm thinking that you maybe should really consider professional help of one type or another.


    ------------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

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    If you rely on any of the locks ,and live to tell,then you wont do it again.Chain everything up ,arm to base ,head to column .......it may not move ,but if it does things happen quick....Ive moved thousands of tons of machinery over the years,and most have gone very smoothly,but if the machine tips up ,and everything is secured ,it can be righted again.Using a forklift ,I always chain the load to the mast ,then it cant slip off.Newbies are amazed /shocked at how easy 10 ton of cast iron skids off a forklift tyne.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gebhart View Post
    It has been a while since I posted last but am still making progress. An issue that I would like to address before I move it is the column lock does not hold in the position over the table. If rotated about 90 degrees it will have much more resistance but can still move if pushed on. I will be blocking up and strapping the arm down so this could be seen as not required. I have searched some and can not find how to adjust it and would like to have an idea of what to do before I open it up. I will post more pictures when I get the rigging set up before I pick it. The lock for the head is also not holding as well as it should. Thanks again for all the help.
    Round column, radial or pillar, this is "standard" as they age and wear.

    Think it through. You have a bore. With a split. Producing limited range of BENDING of a Cast Iron body.... before you risk cracking the CI. Column is worn. slightly. Bore is worn MORE. it had only a fraction as much surface-bearng area as the far longer column. It will not only be loose as to locking, it will have sag away from dead-nuts square.

    After you move the Mike Foxtrot - because for-damned-sure you will NOT be so foolish as to expect magic from ANY clamp, in transit?

    You have many options:

    1) Take the CUMBERSOME bitch apart, bore over size. Fab and fit a steel sleeve, split, that restores a tight fit. I cannot recommended that. At all. Too much work for the value it delivers.

    2) ADD a supplementary locking ring, fabbed in more flexible steel. Easier than it sounds as it need be ONLY a rotation "locking" mechanism, not ALSO the main support. Get"clever" you can even add some pull-up to offset sag.

    3) If you have SERIOUS drilling "push" to counteract? Quick-and-dirty, get a screw-jack under the table, apply sane use of it. That can also correct for sag if even it is bad enough to matter. So can shimming one edge of the work. Learn whatcha got, get used to that. No big deal. You didn't pay "new" price, compensating for wear is part of "sweat equity".

    4) Take a page from the shaper or heavy knee mill book. Fab a flat plate with slots of the same breed as table or over-arm supports. ELSE provide for screw-adjustable rod-style braces. I dooos that for the monster-mass table on the AB5/S.

    No rocket insemination to it. Sin-ugly steel stock and even uglier bag-ass clamps get's 'er done.

    BTW... if option 3 OR 4 applies?

    Fosdick may be the wrong drill altogether.

    An Asquith, C-B, C-O, or ATW they were never.

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    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    If you rely on any of the locks ,and live to tell,then you wont do it again.Chain everything up ,arm to base ,head to column .......it may not move ,but if it does things happen quick....Ive moved thousands of tons of machinery over the years,and most have gone very smoothly,but if the machine tips up ,and everything is secured ,it can be righted again.Using a forklift ,I always chain the load to the mast ,then it cant slip off.Newbies are amazed /shocked at how easy 10 ton of cast iron skids off a forklift tyne.
    Nothing is more liable to fall over than a radial arm drill.

    I once rigged a big " Archdale " as I described in my earlier post. I'd had the drill an inch or two off the ground to try out the lift and then I'd put it back down on the ground because it was lunch time. I went and had a sandwich and a coffee for about 20 minutes. In my absence somebody had been messing with the drill and had undone the drilling head lock. When I came back and began the lift the head began sliding down the arm ! It was on rollers so the slightest incline was all it needed. Luckily for me it went in the right direction, towards the column and no harm was done.

    Be very careful, Tyrone.

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    i had an Asquith OD2 tilt not very much,and the drilling head rolled down the arm ,despite the lock being tight......only a million to one chance saved it and me ....the spindle hit a piece of dunnage on the table ,and stopped wedged tight .....had to be chained and pulled back with a lever hoist....Had a close call years ago when a machine wouldnt move on a ramp of heavy timbers.Someone said to smear the timbers with soap.....moment it got on the soap ,it took off like a rocket ,down the timbers and half way across the shop....Actually stopped about where it was wanted.

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    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    i had an Asquith OD2 tilt not very much,and the drilling head rolled down the arm ,despite the lock being tight......only a million to one chance saved it and me ....the spindle hit a piece of dunnage on the table ,and stopped wedged tight .....had to be chained and pulled back with a lever hoist....Had a close call years ago when a machine wouldnt move on a ramp of heavy timbers.Someone said to smear the timbers with soap.....moment it got on the soap ,it took off like a rocket ,down the timbers and half way across the shop....Actually stopped about where it was wanted.
    "Skates", not grease nor soap, but "too soon" in-play, this go.

    I was pleased the rigging team the top DC/Baltimore pro's of that era once sent me was headed-up by a (younger) "Brother Officer". Former Combat Engineer Lootenant.

    Until... whilst the winch was still being rigged to control descent, the load crunched a too-thin Scotch block, top of an industrial ramp .... and the young fool reflexively tried to jump in front of it to stop it!

    Training must have gone downhill, lo those many years since I had aced the course, then taught it?

    Yanked his 160 lbs or so out of the way by main force as around 6,000 lbs avoir of imported-from-England John Tann's best "Banker's Anti-Arc" burning-bar protected diamond safe went down the ramp, did a mere hundred fifty bucks or so damage to a Kawneer aluminium door frame it "mostly" cleared, punched through the drywall across the hall and "scotched" itself on the resuting shards of 2 x 4 studs and drywall, ALMOST tipping over, forward...

    Into the debris pile and ruint desk back of it on what had NOT been our "planned route of entry!"

    It WAS more direct than clear down the hall, then back with twists and turns, DID save us billable time at the cost of about $350 bucks worth of repair.

    Chairman thought that last part funny as Hell, since we saved the billable, and the rigger's paid for all the repairs as well!

    Words to the effect "in the moment"?
    Son? It may be SMALLER than a household fridge, but that 'Mike Foxtot' MASSES more than a stretched Cadillac LIMO! Yah don't jump in front of EITHER when they are on a STEEP downhill roll!
    Next go, they were more careful. Sent out an older and wiser super. Retired Navy Chief, IIRC. I LIKE grey-hair in a rigger. Means he's careful enough to have LIVED long enough to earn it!

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    Could have completely dis-assembled the thing by now.
    Xported every part separately in back of sub-a-vroom

    "Pennsylvania" is a vague description.

    Firm that up a wee bit, and I could/maybe lend a hand.

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    I saw a telly reality series (when they were actually real,and didnt have tattoed millennials in them) where some housemovers used green bananas to grease wooden skids.

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    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    i had an Asquith OD2 tilt not very much,and the drilling head rolled down the arm ,despite the lock being tight......only a million to one chance saved it and me ....the spindle hit a piece of dunnage on the table ,and stopped wedged tight .....had to be chained and pulled back with a lever hoist....Had a close call years ago when a machine wouldnt move on a ramp of heavy timbers.Someone said to smear the timbers with soap.....moment it got on the soap ,it took off like a rocket ,down the timbers and half way across the shop....Actually stopped about where it was wanted.
    Some guys have all the luck. Smiley face.

    Regards Tyrone.

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    I had plenty of practice as a kid.....my old man was kinda reckless... and bad tempered ....I remember the old dog going for his life as a large tank fell down on him .He took off so quick he left the fleas behind.

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    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    I saw a telly reality series (when they were actually real,and didnt have tattoed millennials in them) where some housemovers used green bananas to grease wooden skids.
    At least one large SHIP went down heavy wooden timber ways atop a few tons of rotting banana PEELS. Made the newspapers. History books, even. If anyone cares.

    Some of my "skates" are no more than a few adjacent sheets of Big Box handy-hobby-bin 36" square galvanized sheet steel and a spritz of lube. Long four-by for lever arm, and yah corner-walk that last few feet right into place within a sillimeter, no real sweat to it.

    Near-as-dammit dead-level concrete floor here, though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    At least one large SHIP went down heavy wooden timber ways atop a few tons of rotting banana PEELS..
    I worked with an engineer, came from the Mediterranean area, was a nautical engineer.

    He said the launching regularly used barrels of "banana lubricant" apparently made for the job.
    He also said it smoked during the slide, and stunk bad.

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    So - gone are the days when they were only for use for people and sealed concrete floors eh?


    ------------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

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    I have an update I finally moved the drill was busy now getting to post about it. All went well it is sitting in its new temporary home till I get some where to go with it.I do not have many pictures was more concentrating on moving it safely.img_20200131_145514049.jpgimg_20200131_145538444.jpgimg_20200205_130106188_hdr.jpgimg_20200205_144031410_hdr.jpgimg_20200131_145553991_hdr.jpg

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    img_20200207_132820763_hdr.jpgimg_20200207_132829837.jpgimg_20200208_080238996_hdr.jpgimg_20200208_080254241_hdr.jpg

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    OK, so now what'chew gunna doo with it?
    (use wise)


    --------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post
    OK, so now what'chew gunna doo with it?
    (use wise)


    --------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox
    "Water it"....it's a lawn ornament.

    Why no snow in the Pix ?

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    And it's not a drill, it's a drill press; BIIIIG difference.


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