Getting a lathe off a pallet - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 87
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    317
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4
    Likes (Received)
    71

    Default Getting a lathe off a pallet

    Quote Originally Posted by mpmar_bt View Post
    Since you have use of a fork truck I would lift and block it up one end at a time. Then just slide the forks under and away you go. Move the pallet and then set it down on the same blocking on the floor. You know the headstock end lifting point. As for the tailstock end I would look for a through web on the base where I could use a heavy lift strap basket style. Hook the strap over the fork and ease it up just enough to slip the 4X4 underneath and then ease the lift back down.

    You want to end up like this:

    Attachment 261780

    My thinking is that blocking one end at a time will keep the other end on the ground so pretty stable as long as you move slowly and only lift it enough to block it.

    I left mine on 4X4s so I could get under it with a pallet jack. That would be a bad plan for most lathes but the base on that guy is so solid I don't think wood movement will affect it.
    Thanks. Picture is worth a thousand words. That helps. Think Iíll have to cut away part of the pallet to do as you suggest. For more pics and issues with this lathe, see my thread in the Monarch section.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Illinois
    Posts
    1,348
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    971
    Likes (Received)
    576

    Default

    I assume the lathe was put on the skid with a crane. Easiest way off is with a crane, gantry, or whatever. Three of the lathe I have owned recommended lifting using a sling around one of the cross members of the bed. Unless the bed construction of the Rivett prevents doing that, I think that is the best way to lift and move a lathe.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,026
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    731
    Likes (Received)
    662

    Default

    Over 48 hrs have elapsed...hopefully he's got it off the skid by now.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    317
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4
    Likes (Received)
    71

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RC Mech View Post
    Over 48 hrs have elapsed...hopefully he's got it off the skid by now.
    Unfortunately no! Still waiting on my friend with the big lift.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Missouri
    Posts
    778
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    665
    Likes (Received)
    217

    Default

    I agree with those suggesting lifting with slings. Lifting from the bottom is ok but is less forgiving on unlevel terrain or a jerk of the clutch. If using forks strap the lathe to the mast while traveling.
    I tipped my Ingersoll Rand type 30 air compressor before I had time to react. It only damaged the air cleaner but that was $80.00
    Tipping an older lathe can result in a total loss.
    We all have seen tipped lathes here on the forum..
    That's a nice lathe. Accept the colors, easy fix for that

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Cottage Grove, MN 55016
    Posts
    7,590
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4093
    Likes (Received)
    4537

    Default

    http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/2379/20326.pdf

    also this one has photo's near the back with that cover off. http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/2379/4491.pdf

    The first one says to use lifting hooks. I would also say you could probably call a local machine mover who could do it in 10 minutes and you might take a day or 2, have to buy hooks, chains, straps, engine lift, etc. and get hurt if your not knowledgeable. Or tip it over and ruin the machine. Call around and find a company who move printing machines as they are equipped with smaller forklifts and I find them to be cheaper.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    317
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4
    Likes (Received)
    71

    Default

    For fear of damaging it I may call a rigging company. I admittedly don't know what I'm doing.

  8. Likes mllud22, Hodge liked this post
  9. #28
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    South Carolina
    Posts
    622
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    214
    Likes (Received)
    371

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TravisR100 View Post
    For fear of damaging it I may call a rigging company. I admittedly don't know what I'm doing.
    Good call, not nearly as expensive as a damaged lathe. It's not a hard job if you have been exposed to this type of work but can be daunting if not.

  10. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    California, Central Coast
    Posts
    3,324
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2153
    Likes (Received)
    1293

    Default

    Just get a tow truck, the old style with a boom and winch.
    Or can you hook a hoist to the ceiling?

  11. #30
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    26,034
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    8214

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hodge View Post
    Good call, not nearly as expensive as a damaged lathe. It's not a hard job if you have been exposed to this type of work but can be daunting if not.
    Cheap, too. But not a lot of help unless the OP has seriously high ceilings and door opening to match.

    EX:

    My first 10EE, the seller had called-out a basic auto-wrecker, rigged for sling lift from above through the bed web so no issue with rods or controls, pallet just hung there under it.

    $80 plus a $20 tip, and I hit the road in short order.

    Unloading, I used a heavy Korean dual-pneumatic tire FL to insure my uneven driveway was less of a risk as to side-tip. ISTR the rent with drop & recover was close to $400.

    And THEN.. I had to timber-shove it back into the shop under a very low roll-up door opening. The sawzall work to get it separated from the pallet - described above - still had to follow all that work and expense.

    That said, I would surely have had MORE work and greatly increased risk of tipping it over had I removed the pallet outdoors, then had to get the "naked" lathe into the shop without the stout pallet working for me against a face-plant disaster - or build NEW skids to replace the pallet, just for the last 20 feet or so.

  12. #31
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Vermont
    Posts
    152
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    69
    Likes (Received)
    32

    Default

    I bought a hydraulic stacker for $600. Used it for moving a CMM with a heavy casting, around 2500 lb, and shimmying the robodrill around a bit. Also works perfectly for taking the 5-axis trunnion in and out. A bit pricy, but you might find one in your area for cheap, and if itís one time use, they sell pretty easily.

    Sounds like youíre already there though. Iíve seen hundreds of tons of locomotive moved in some interesting ways in some hard to reach places with nothing but pry bars and hardwood blocking. Hiring riggers seems a bit much for as far as youíve gotten.


  13. Likes RC Mech liked this post
  14. #32
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Oklahoma City, OK
    Posts
    4,161
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    718
    Likes (Received)
    1757

    Default

    Engine hoist to pick up the tailstock end and then roll a bar under it past the balance point. Set it down, headstock end come up. Slide a bar wider than the pallet under the headstock and crib it up above the pallet. Use hoist to pick up tail end and slide the pallet out.


    Lower tail onto cribbing. Pick up head, remove the bar and crib it even with tail. Now is a great time to slide a pallet jack under it, btw.

    Work the hoist back and forth, removing a little cribbing at a time. Strips of 3/4 plywood are perfect.

    It's time consuming but pretty safe as long as you move slowly and work in small increments.

    Sent from my SM-G973U using Tapatalk

  15. #33
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    GERMANY
    Posts
    2,608
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1611
    Likes (Received)
    903

    Default

    I had to get a cylindrical grinder 1.8 metric tons, so about the same weight off a pallet a year ago. Problem was even nastier, because the grinder occupied the entire top of the pallet - there was less than one inch of pallet showing on all four sides. I had nothing over head to lift with, and the grinder is top heavy.

    What helped me was that there were M20 threaded holes in each corner of the base for adjustable feet. But the feet were packed separately so the threaded holes were empty. So I bought one meter of M20 threaded rod, and made up two wood beams (cross section was 100 x 200mm, so 4 x 8 inches) which I then attached to the base above the threaded holes, one in front and one in back. The beams were longer than the machine by about 200mm (8") on each side.

    I then used a pair of hydraulic car jacks to lift the beams sticking out on the right hand side. Once the weight was off the pallet, I put in a stack of plywood squares that I had pre-cut for this. These went underneath the beam ends on the right hand side. Then I shifted the hydraulic jacks to the left side of the machine, lifted the beams on that side, put those beam end onto plywood squares. Now that the weight was off the pallet, I just pulled the pallet out from under the machine. With the pallet was out, I put a 2.5 ton hand pallet jack under the machine, lifted it, removed plywood squares from beams one at a time, and lowered the machine to blocking near the ground. Then removed the wooden beams, inserted feet and steel footing plates, and used the foot screws to jack the machine up a few mm to remove the last blocking. Then used the foot screws to lower machine onto its feet.

    Looking at your lathe, I can see that there is a gap between the pallet and the machine base. If that gap is wide enough, you can get a pair of sturdy steel bars long enough to extend 8" past the pallet on each side, insert them (front to back) in that gap, and then jack up the ends of those bars and put them on a plywood stack. If you do this, attach stops to the bars so that the machine can not slip forwards or backwards on them. I would also use some wood pieces clamped to the bars to keep their spacing fixed.

    Then remove the pallet and put a stack of plywood squares under each corner food. Then use a pallet jack to start lowering the machine. Since the jack won't lift as high as your pallet, you will need to go in stages with some spacer layers of wood on the fork of the jack, removing plywood squares from the corners in steps.

    By the way, some good advice I got was "do not do this with a helper". Plan each stage and do it alone. A helper is a distraction and adds time pressure. It also tempts you to try and use muscle power. That's hopeless against this weight. You should never be rushed, and never be struggling or breaking a sweat. If you can't do it alone, you need a better plan.

  16. #34
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    26,034
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    8214

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ballen View Post
    By the way, some good advice I got was "do not do this with a helper". Plan each stage and do it alone. A helper is a distraction and adds time pressure. It also tempts you to try and use muscle power. That's hopeless against this weight. You should never be rushed, and never be struggling or breaking a sweat. If you can't do it alone, you need a better plan.
    Seconded. Or maybe we are going circular? 'coz I learnt it, then passed it on!

    Safety at a distance with a cellphone to call EMT is OK. Long as they keep the distance.

    And their distracting mouth shut.

    I can't be bothered. Long past my sell-by date, anyway.


  17. #35
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New York
    Posts
    1,453
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    789
    Likes (Received)
    618

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ballen View Post
    I had to get a cylindrical grinder 1.8 metric tons, so about the same weight off a pallet a year ago

    By the way, some good advice I got was "do not do this with a helper". Plan each stage and do it alone. A helper is a distraction and adds time pressure. It also tempts you to try and use muscle power. That's hopeless against this weight. You should never be rushed, and never be struggling or breaking a sweat. If you can't do it alone, you need a better plan.
    Sorry, ballen, have to disagree with that!

    Donít do it with the wrong helper, that CAN be really bad. Someone who is impatient, anxious, or dumb, (or worse all three) can be a disaster.
    someone who is calm, reasonably intelligent and takes direction well is really good to have around. Even if they donít have experience moving heavy gear, they can at least call emergency services. The mere thought of being trapped by a heavy machine with no one to raise the alarm is terrifying.

  18. #36
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    317
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4
    Likes (Received)
    71

    Default Getting a lathe off a pallet

    I really appreciate all the suggestions. Itís still sitting on the pallet at the moment but I havenít been in a rush. Itís been nice having it in the middle of the shop while Iíve worked through electrical tracing. Lots of space on all sides.

    Ballen, that gap you see only goes about 3Ē then itís solid to the pallet again.

    Thunderskunk, is that what they call a roll-a-lift?


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  19. #37
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    California, Central Coast
    Posts
    3,324
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2153
    Likes (Received)
    1293

    Default

    roll a lift is like a hand dolly with a hydraulic lifting mechanism, they are used in pairs.

  20. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    26,034
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    8214

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TravisR100 View Post
    ...is that what they call a roll-a-lift?
    Rol-A-Lift: Home

    Rentable, many places. Need a bit of care to use safely.

  21. #39
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Vermont
    Posts
    152
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    69
    Likes (Received)
    32

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TravisR100 View Post
    I really appreciate all the suggestions. Itís still sitting on the pallet at the moment but I havenít been in a rush. Itís been nice having it in the middle of the shop while Iíve worked through electrical tracing. Lots of space on all sides.

    Ballen, that gap you see only goes about 3Ē then itís solid to the pallet again.

    Thunderskunk, is that what they call a roll-a-lift?


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Naw, thatís a bit different. Mine has legs under each fork, just as long and with wheels.

    Found this in your area:
    electric yale stacker 24v - heavy equipment - by owner - sale

  22. #40
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    California, Central Coast
    Posts
    3,324
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2153
    Likes (Received)
    1293

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thunderskunk View Post
    Naw, that’s a bit different. Mine has legs under each fork, just as long and with wheels.

    Found this in your area:
    electric yale stacker 24v - heavy equipment - by owner - sale
    That looks a great deal, out here something like would start at $2500 or be a complete roach.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •