Getting a lathe off a pallet - Page 3
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 41 to 60 of 87
  1. #41
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    9,957
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3358
    Likes (Received)
    3567

    Default

    I would use my pinch bar and lift each corner straight up at 1" each hard wood shims to lift corners evenly, to get the needed amount to get forks under. lift it straight up just enough to slide out the pallet.. run a chin to the lathe and to the pallet truck just tight made tight. Then set it down to about 1 1/2" off floor and go slow to the place to set..with watching for any jags/bumps in the floor that might want to tilt.. .

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Maryland- USA
    Posts
    3,337
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1929
    Likes (Received)
    2130

    Default

    The last machine I brought into the shop is this nice Italian edge sander which weighs in at about 1200 lbs.
    The sander was in a pro shop and had sat unused for the last twenty years after the owner managed to roll it over onto his lap while working on it.
    This type of machine is very top heavy like your lathe.
    He had set it up on a pallet to work on and rolled it over while yanking on a belt or something- the machine tore open his leg from his groin to his ankle which landed him in the hospital for two months.

    I got there to pick up the machine and he had it half propped up on a pallet AGAIN as he thought it would help me get straps under to move it...

    Be careful- if you are not absolutely sure of what you are doing don’t do anything till you are.

  3. Likes ballen liked this post
  4. #43
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    GERMANY
    Posts
    2,617
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1616
    Likes (Received)
    910

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Seconded. Or maybe we are going circular? 'coz I learnt it, then passed it on!
    Actually it comes from Ross (AlfaGTA) here: Deckel FP2 acquired (Preliminary). Good post, worth reading.

    Cyanide, yes, perhaps you are right. Ross did include a possible helper. To quote, "Further, the moving of heavy machines is best done singularly...or with a trusted mate....Here many hands don't make light work...rather many hands almost always make for mistakes and trouble."

  5. Likes cyanidekid liked this post
  6. #44
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    GERMANY
    Posts
    2,617
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1616
    Likes (Received)
    910

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    I would use my pinch bar and lift each corner straight up at 1"
    Buck, I tried this with my machine on a pallet. All that happened was that I started crushing/splitting the wood of the pallet. There was no way to spread the load.

  7. #45
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    1,577
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1017
    Likes (Received)
    908

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ballen View Post
    Here many hands don't make light work...rather many hands almost always make for mistakes and trouble."
    I've moved machines with friends and I'm in charge, nobody does anything unless I tell them too.

    If people are making mistakes it's the fault of the person doing the directing.

    The last machine I moved a Graziano SAG14 would have been absolutely impossible to move without help due to the space it had to go into.

    It also helps I'm never in a hurry to move machines and take my time to make sure it's done right

  8. #46
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    GERMANY
    Posts
    2,617
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1616
    Likes (Received)
    910

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TravisR100 View Post
    Ballen, that gap you see only goes about 3” then it’s solid to the pallet again.
    OK, then what I proposed does not work.

    You could try a modified version: a pair of long beams one along the front and one along the back, each of which have a steel plate attached the same length as that slot and projecting out from the beams 3" into that slot. The beams are attached to each other and project far enough out past the end of the machine to make a "litter" or "gurney" which you can then lift with hydraulic jacks to get the machine a fraction of an inch above the pallet. Important considerations would be the strength of the beams, the attachment of the steel plates that do the lifting, and the attachment of the beams to each other so that they can not spread and drop the load.

  9. #47
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    9,957
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3358
    Likes (Received)
    3567

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ballen View Post
    Buck, I tried this with my machine on a pallet. All that happened was that I started crushing/splitting the wood of the pallet. There was no way to spread the load.
    Granted .. I should have added: Shim the pallet's underside so it is solid to the floor under it .. thanks for the correction..my bad

  10. #48
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    GERMANY
    Posts
    2,617
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1616
    Likes (Received)
    910

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    Granted .. I should have added: Shim the pallet's underside so it is solid to the floor under it .. thanks for the correction..my bad
    That was not the problem for me. That part of the pallet had solid support right down to the floor. The problem was the top board of the pallet, which was oak or similar hardwood. When I jammed a crowbar under the machine and started to lift, the wood just crushed/split. The machine was 1800kg so I needed around 1000 kg of lift at that corner, and it was being spread over a square inch. That pressure (2000 lbs per square inch) was enough to spread the wood fibers and split the wood.

    This is not surprising. If you look at the strength of typical hardwoods like white oak (page 5-10 and 5-11 of https://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/f...chapter_05.pdf for example) you will see that for forces applied parallel to the grain they are a few thousand lbs per square inch. But for forces applied perpendicular to the grain (as in this case) they are typically around 700-1000 lbs per square inch. So a crowbar might well just split the top boards of the pallet. That's not a good thing, because if the pallet falls apart it might dump the lathe on the floor or worse.

  11. #49
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    26,142
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    8245

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ballen View Post
    That was not the problem for me. That part of the pallet had solid support right down to the floor. The problem was the top board of the pallet, which was oak or similar hardwood. When I jammed a crowbar under the machine and started to lift, the wood just crushed/split. The machine was 1800kg so I needed around 1000 kg of lift at that corner, and it was being spread over a square inch. That pressure (2000 lbs per square inch) was enough to spread the wood fibers and split the wood.

    This is not surprising. If you look at the strength of typical hardwoods like white oak (page 5-10 and 5-11 of https://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/f...chapter_05.pdf for example) you will see that for forces applied parallel to the grain they are a few thousand lbs per square inch. But for forces applied perpendicular to the grain (as in this case) they are typically around 700-1000 lbs per square inch. So a crowbar might well just split the top boards of the pallet. That's not a good thing, because if the pallet falls apart it might dump the lathe on the floor or worse.
    Eh, wot? No need to make a problem out of a solution. Your momma never shewed you how to place a small steel plate as fulcrum so the bar didn't doo that?

    if you have none, already, they are stock items, any US "big box" or builder's supply. Sold over where they stock tubular "demolition" column/jacks.

  12. #50
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    GERMANY
    Posts
    2,617
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1616
    Likes (Received)
    910

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Your momma never shewed you how to place a small steel plate as fulcrum so the bar didn't doo that?
    Bill, I enjoy your posts but not your taunting insults.

    No way to get a plate underneath there. Tried hammering one in, crushed into wood and hung up.

  13. #51
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    26,142
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    8245

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ballen View Post
    No way to get a plate underneath there. Tried hammering one in, crushed into wood and hung up.

    It isn't meant to go "underneath". You would have no place to put the prybar's tip. Try in front of AKA alongside. Out in plain sight, IOW.

    If. then, the prybar wants hammered-in, wood crush is harmless - the crushed area under it will not be asked to do load-bearing. The fulcrum plate will.

    You might want to have more than just the one type of prybar, pinch bar, Johnson bar, pry-dolly.

    What gets hammered-in - if/as/when one must - is a wedge. Wide one, and with some length to it. Plenty of bearing area. Significant crush very unlikely. Several prybar types, the tip now has an opening, adjacent. Mind to furnish it a proper fulcrum. With a plate, for example.

    A pinch bar can work directly, but still need a plate under its heel.

  14. #52
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    South Carolina
    Posts
    629
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    222
    Likes (Received)
    377

    Default

    If all else fails you could introduce a ravenous tribe of thermites to the pallet and they will quickly chew the wood from underneath.....

  15. #53
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    26,142
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    8245

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hodge View Post
    If all else fails you could introduce a ravenous tribe of thermites to the pallet and they will quickly chew the wood from underneath.....
    Already outlined how that is done. Post #4:

    Getting a lathe off a pallet

    For-real. 1942 10EE off a full-2-inch dimensional-not-nominal pallet, full lower-deck, bolted. not lagged. Oil-soaked, even. Lathe had prolly been RUN on it for some years, one owner back of the one I bought it from who already had a better-conditon 10EE as had been his late Dad's.

    Pallet was about 5 by 6 foot, so no way to get up close without being ON it. That was the driver for cutting "wells" into it to place the jack to get skates under it.

    So yes. Of course. Chewed the pallet remains to flinders. Value was in the lathe, not the wood.

    Old bustid teeth is all I have left, so I uses a Milwaukee Sawzall, though.


  16. Likes Hodge, itsmeBernie liked this post
  17. #54
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    14,548
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Light pallet on FIRE.
    Remaining piles of evenly distributed nails act as small rollers.

  18. Likes dalmatiangirl61 liked this post
  19. #55
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Utah
    Posts
    898
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1884
    Likes (Received)
    353

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    Light pallet on FIRE.
    Remaining piles of evenly distributed nails act as small rollers.
    Jerk!

  20. #56
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    14,548
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TheOldCar View Post
    Jerk!
    Yes, I negated to explain how the heads on the nails will cause the machine to only
    roll in circles.....

  21. #57
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    26,142
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    8245

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TheOldCar View Post
    Jerk!
    Ummhh.. it is actually related to a seldom-used, but proven rigger's technique for places no human can be exposed. Along with thermate and dry ice, all have their uses.

    Real-world applications:

    The bracing steel beams, lock repairs at Charleroi, PA were set with amorphous sulfur between two steel load-bearing plates as adhesive.

    Came time to let the river back in, beams were cabled to the crane as would lift them out, Sulfur was set afire with remote-controlled pyrotechical devices. No blast as explosives wudda caused.

    Dry ice placed under massive machinery, man on each load point with a steam lance, lower it right into place. No jacks to remove. Saudi Arabia.

    Thermate charges, one cuts a failed bridge apart without breaking windows or risking the lives of welder's with cutting torches. Morgantown/Westover, WV.

    That said, dumb idea, this case.

    Very.

    Ever' body knows the heat-treat of the nails goes wonky. 'Stead of rollers, yah gets an effect kinda like studded tires.
    Last edited by thermite; 07-30-2019 at 06:02 PM.

  22. Likes digger doug liked this post
  23. #58
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    317
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4
    Likes (Received)
    71

    Default

    And THAT is how you get a 4000 lb lathe off a skid.




    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  24. Likes sfriedberg liked this post
  25. #59
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    317
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4
    Likes (Received)
    71

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mpmar_bt View Post
    Welcome. Racking my brain to remember - that guy has been six deep in a connex box since last summer. I'm in the middle of about the slowest shop move ever.

    Anyway, how I damaged that rod was to get in a hurry and pick it with a timber crosswise under the bed slung with heavy lifting strap. Timber was too long and pulled up on the rod. If you stoop down and eyeball it you can see how it would work to get support under the bed without hitting that rod. But move the support too far to the front it will interfere with the rod.

    I think the electrical box is under that headstock end base cover. I could see using the top of that window as a lift point. That base is crazy stout. I would usually be skittish about lifting a lathe from a point below the bed. Recipe for flipping, too much weight above lift point. In this case with that base, motor and clutch assembly mounted on a big inch thick plate you got enough weight below to be fairly stable.

    So, you've got some good solid methods well described above. How are you thinking you want to do it?

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
    How did you straighten your control rod?


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  26. #60
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    317
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4
    Likes (Received)
    71

    Default Getting a lathe off a pallet

    I really appreciate everyone posting their suggestions. I ended up using a combination of ideas from these posts.

    You can see in the previous pics I posted that at each corner of the lathe at the bottom there is a little carve out for a 3/4-10 leveling bolt. The bolts that were in there were about 4” long which is just long enough to stay fully threaded in the casting and extend past the gap to the floor. So, not long enough to really lift it off the skid more than an inch or so. In addition the head of the bolt would probably have driven itself into the hard wood before it actually accomplished any lifting.

    My idea was to go get a 36” piece of 3/4” threaded rod and cut this into 4 9” pieces. My plan was to remove the existing 4” long leveling bolts and replace them with the 9” long pieces of threaded rod. The one tool I didn’t have that i borrowed was a sort of a toe jack. It’s designed for picking up the axles of aircraft low to the ground. Cool feature is that the toe can be adjusted up or down.

    First problem was to get the existing 4” long leveling bolts out of the base. Unscrewing them would screw them right down into the pallet.

    I cut the ends of the pallet away to get clearance to unscrew the existing leveling bolts.

    With the leveling bolts out I could jack the lathe up high enough to thread in the 9” threaded rods on each corner.



    I was concerned about the threaded rod bending and wanted to minimize the stick out as much as possible. I took plywood squares and stacked them as tall as I could while still having them clear the cross boards of the pallet. I took some small steel plates and placed them between the end of the bolt and the plywood to spread the load over the plywood and not have the end of the bolt bearing on it.

    At that point I could release the jack and leave the lathe standing on the bolts, steel, and plywood.

    YouTube

    Now I just needed to cut away the end cross board at each end. This allowed me to slide the pallet all the way to the front of the lathe and cut as close as possible to the center beam. Repeat to the back of the lathe then slide the center piece out.



    That then left me with...



    From here it was easy. Jack up each end, remove threaded rods, lower onto plywood stacks. I went back and forth on each end doing this to minimize the amount of headstock/tailstock tilt as I brought it down.

    Voila.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  27. Likes sfriedberg, Sachmanram liked this post

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •