Homemade Rigger's Boom - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 43
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Coastal Dogpatch, SC, USA
    Posts
    51,311
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2801
    Likes (Received)
    5617

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dshore View Post
    Now, I can lift that 4 ton Pacemaker lathe when I find one on CL for a hundred bucks -- Ha!
    Dale
    But you could lift it even better/safer with forks, so the purpose of this boom escapes me. It's my impression that the rigger's booms come into play mostly with 40,000 lb capacity forklifts that are picking up tall and dangerously top heavy machines like huge punch presses that almost demand lifting from above. Not the case with a lathe....so in this case, what is the purpose really ?

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    5,761
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    269
    Likes (Received)
    1456

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Royldean View Post
    It's amazing how many racecars have gussets like that.
    wasn`t aware squere tubes were used in racecars I am no expert but a racecar has much more dynamic loads and isn`t that different

    Peter from Holland

  3. Likes extropic, neilho liked this post
  4. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    1,100
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5795
    Likes (Received)
    197

    Default

    I like it and would come in handy in confined spaces. I have no room for such a thing but if I did I would have a hanger
    on the wall soemwhere to store / retrieve it for easy change over back to forks in no time.

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Temecula, CA
    Posts
    25
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    36

    Default

    Regarding the strength of the Grade 8 bolts for the clamps --- A 5/8-18 Grade 8 bolt (good for 150,000 psi tensile) has a tensile strength of about 30,000 lb, and a shear strength of about 18,000 lb. In picking up an 8,000 lb vertical load at a 24" load center, and taking into consideration the pertinent dimensions of the thing I built, this would result in a tensile load on all 4 bolts combined of about 9,100 lb (or about 2275 lb/bolt). And the shear load on each bolt would be 2,000 lb. Now, if I move that same load out to a load center of 30" (which might be necessary for a big fat lathe), the resultant load on those bolts would be about 2,850 lb -- due to the longer moment arm. At an even longer moment arm of a 48" load center, it would be about 4,575 lb/bolt -- still not close to the capacity of the bolts. These numbers are based on the mast and the loads being vertical, in which case, the height of the mast does not enter the picture. Keeping the whole mess as close to vertical as possible during a lift and move is important, though. Another matter is the possibility of the vertical mast flexing with a load. If need be, this can be fixed with some added stiffeners or truss.

    Picking up 8,000 lb at a 48" load center may indeed make the lift truck go "tilt." My Hyster is rated at 8,800 lb at a 24" load center. This translates to a capacity of 4,400 lb at a 48" load center -- no good for that big fat lathe, but I wouldn't try such a stunt anyway.

    Regarding the purpose of this boom --- Many factors. My shop has a 10' ceiling, and a door opening just under 8'. Plus, my lift truck has an old style mast/lift system with no free lift capacity -- that is, as soon as I start to lift something off the floor with the forks, the mast starts to extend toward the sky (or ceiling). When I moved my Cincinnati mill into the shop (when I had only the forks), I could only grab the thing with the forks quite a way up, just under the overarm. At this point, the top of the mast just barely cleared the ceiling, and made for tricky maneuvering between lights, etc.

    Top heavy stuff -- Lifting a 1400 lb top heavy Grob bandsaw from the bottom using forks is no fun for me. Lifting from under the upper wheel housing with forks is no fun for the ceiling in my shop. Much easier and safer to lift with straps from above, I believe. Some lathes and other machine tools are top heavy too.

    Another factor -- I work on old cars (hot rods), including body-off stuff. Hard to get the forks underneath a body (between body and frame), and I don't like putting forks through open or empty windows. Plus, again the height thing -- if using forks, I wouldn't be able to get the body high enough to clear the engine, etc. Lifting car bodies and other car components is the reason I made the boom to extend so far out. It will reach a little over 6' from the boom's vertical member. Lifting heavy loads this far out will not be on the agenda; the body shell of a 33 Ford weighs only a few hundred lb. Pulling a 600 lb engine at this reach distance would also be do-able.

    As to why I didn't get one of those store-bought boom extensions that just slip over the forks? 3 reasons. First, it's the height thing again. Second, the load center is too far out, way beyond the ends of the forks, so the heavy lift capacity is shot. 3rd reason is I'm cheap. Couldn't find one of those fork extension things for less than $600 (used).

    After seeing prices of several of the ready-built real rigger's booms for sale, I said forget it -- too rich for my blood. So I figured I could build one and started pricing new and lightly used steel -- still too much money. But when I stumbled upon a bunch of steel for less than half the going price of remnant steel, I went for it.

    And, the last and most important reason for the purpose, which has no practical justification. Fact is, I like to build stuff!

    Lastly -- regarding gussets and oil canning. Those suggestions may indeed be spot on. I will keep an eye on things during the first few (easy to moderate) lifts, and give this some thought.

    Thanks again for the good questions, input, and advice. Dale

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Coastal Dogpatch, SC, USA
    Posts
    51,311
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2801
    Likes (Received)
    5617

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Laurentian View Post
    I like it and would come in handy in confined spaces. I have no room for such a thing but if I did I would have a hanger
    on the wall soemwhere to store / retrieve it for easy change over back to forks in no time.
    Can you explain that further as I still don't get how that contraption would be better in "confined spaces" than forks. For one thing if you have free floating mast you could raise the forks up pretty high before you hit the ceiling in his place...but with that boom he'll hit the ceiling before he can do anything useful.

    And if he needs the "boom" aspect to reach way out, why is that better than a fork attachment that does the same thing ?? (and does it with less change over hassels)

    (on edit) I see OP and I were posting at about the same time...so some questions were answered (no free float mast for one...but "likes to build stuff" is the answer I suspected as the main reason)....but that still doesn't let you off the hook

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    1,100
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5795
    Likes (Received)
    197

    Default

    He just mentioned it, low ceiling and getting into nooks and crannies.
    Hot rod frame offs / engine drop in etc. Works for me.

    My shop is so packed that only a small forklift could navigate, and the single sky hook type
    set up the OP has would be ideal to lift off a machine table or nudge something up and over a little.
    We used to have an engine hoist for these kinds of situations. The OP's is an engine
    hoist on testosterone booster

  8. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    5,202
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1141
    Likes (Received)
    1022

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Laurentian View Post
    He just mentioned it, low ceiling and getting into nooks and crannies.
    Hot rod frame offs / engine drop in etc. Works for me.
    I don't see any problem with the OP's project, and seems to work for him.

    It's not as if he bought the fanciest, most expensive VMC, learned every control of the machine and didn't even make a single chip on it.

    The boom looks like it could be useful to me. And it looks like pretty nice work he did on it. That should be worth some credit.

  9. Likes Laurentian, tc429 liked this post
  10. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Bay Area, Ca
    Posts
    1,413
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    11
    Likes (Received)
    193

    Default

    That's a beautifully fabricated weldment and an excellent idea; there are a number of times one of those would have saved me quite the headache.

    In detail, I echo ewlsey and scojen's concerns about gusseting and weld reinforcement. This article covers my concerns when looking at that boom-to-mast gusset: Using gussets and other stiffeners correctly | Processes content from Welding Design & Fabrication I don't know if it's relevant given the loads you designed for, but it's just a thought.

    Otherwise, really nice work and it's nice to hear you've run the numbers to make it safe.

  11. Likes Laurentian liked this post
  12. #29
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Temecula, CA
    Posts
    25
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    36

    Default

    Milacron wrote: "...but with that boom he'll hit the ceiling before he can do anything useful."

    Actually, just the opposite. With the entire boom at rest, on the floor, the lift points on the horizontal beam are about 6' above the floor, and the top of the beam is a little more than 3' below the ceiling. I can hang a chain fall or similar hoist from the beam. Then, I can lift a load, for example a lathe for which the bottom of the bed ways are about 3' above the floor, with some beams underneath the bed, straps, and the chain fall. I can lift the load a foot maybe more, just using the chain fall. Then with the lift truck, and can easily lift the whole mess another 3 feet using the truck and boom.

    Why is the boom's horizontal beam 6' above the floor, one may ask? It's because I'm 5' 10" tall, so I don't have to worry about slamming my head into it when the machine is parked and I'm walking around and doing other stuff around the place.
    Another benefit of not having the forks sitting on the floor in front of the machine when it's parked, is that I've eliminated a pesky trip hazard.

    Regarding hassle involved in switching between rigger's boom and forks, it's not too bad. About 20 minutes going either way. And with the stand I made for the boom, I can remove thing outside the shop and leave it, and not take up valuable floor space inside.

  13. Likes Laurentian, TeachMePlease liked this post
  14. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Temecula, CA
    Posts
    25
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    36

    Default

    Halcohead: Thanks for pointing me to the article on gusseting and welding.

    In my mind, the problem the article discusses may not be that relevant to my situation, since the application of stresses in their case differs quite a bit from the rigger's boom (or at least, my rigger's boom). Specifically, they're talking about a welded joint in an over-the-road trailer. The joints in this application are subjected to many many stress cycles for every mile that trailer goes down the road. Many of these stresses may be quite small, but their numbers are probably in the hundreds of thousands (maybe millions) over the useful life of the structure. Also, there can be stress risers in corners where the weld bead meets the base metal. With continuous small stresses, these result in the metal work hardening, leading to a crack that starts out tiny, but grows larger and larger.

    I think the stresses for some parts of the rigger's boom may indeed be quite large for a heavy lift, but there will not be many, at least not that many on mine. As opposed to hundreds of stress cycles per minute (in the case of a trailer or other vehicle), my contraption will be seeing stress cycles on the order of a half dozen in a year, and maybe only a couple per year for the heavy stuff.

    However, above I stated "...may not be that relevant…" But on the other hand, stuff still might happen. That's why I plan on keeping an eye on things, and adding the appropriate stiffening if needed.

    Thanks again, Dale

  15. Likes Laurentian liked this post
  16. #31
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Syracuse, NY USA
    Posts
    9,702
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    19
    Likes (Received)
    581

    Default

    a comment on your bolt loading reasoning etc. static loading is one thing, but your dynamic loads are potentially many times the static loads. if say you are picking up a 2000 lb machine that is out of balance and suddenly flops over [it happens] that sudden twist can concentrate the entire load on one corner, add a sudden stoping jerk and bang! you need more and bigger fasteners, gussets, etc. also I would suggest a removeable diagonal bar between the vertical and the top beam that can be added when your load is out a ways. lifting a 500 lb engine thing, but your are implying that you plan on doing more. Again, I think this is a nice job, I just dont think you are done.

  17. Likes Admin5, digger doug liked this post
  18. #32
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    7,471
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    429
    Likes (Received)
    3430

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dshore View Post
    Halcohead: Thanks for pointing me to the article on gusseting and welding.

    In my mind, the problem the article discusses may not be that relevant to my situation, since the application of stresses in their case differs quite a bit from the rigger's boom (or at least, my rigger's boom).
    The failing gusset in the article by Blodgett illustrates, I believe, the principal "Never weld crosswise on a beam". That short weld across the end of the gusset in Blodgett's trailer example is welded crosswise, and the strain gages showed it cracked under minimal load.

    You are correct in your assumption your boom will not see the rapid cyclic loading of an over the road trailer. But you still have the problem of a soft joint. A joint that allows considerable deflection will fail at loads that a casual examination considers to be safe. Part of the mechanism is a gradual tearing of the joint. The rigid parts of the joint take the initial load, while the soft parts simply deflect. Then tearing will start at the rigid area and proceed through the rest of the joint. For illustration, this is just how a circus strongman tears a phone book in half. He rolls it so he starts tearing one page and then proceeds through the entire book.

  19. Likes digger doug liked this post
  20. #33
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    SE Ohio
    Posts
    907
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    137

    Default

    Nice job, but for the detail of the attachment plate for the clevise in photo 5. I would of cut slots in top and bottom of rectangular tube, and extended the lifting lug up through it, and welded to both top and bottom sides of the box tube.

    Or better yet, just capped the end of the box tube with a longer piece of flat bar, and welded to all four sides. NOT an engineer of any type, so what do I know: just my two cents worth.

  21. Likes matt_isserstedt liked this post
  22. #34
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    marysville ohio
    Posts
    9,361
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2668
    Likes (Received)
    6185

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Royldean View Post
    It's amazing how many racecars have gussets like that.
    Most race cars are round tubing, no flat surface, the curved surface of a round tube is much stiffer than the flat surface of box tubing. When you see a chassis after a big wreck you seldom see the tube crushed in by the gusset.

  23. Likes tdmidget, neilho liked this post
  24. #35
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Tucson AZ
    Posts
    6,327
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    9457
    Likes (Received)
    2972

    Default

    "Regarding the strength of the Grade 8 bolts for the clamps --- A 5/8-18 Grade 8 bolt (good for 150,000 psi tensile) has a tensile strength of about 30,000 lb, and a shear strength of about 18,000 lb. In picking up an 8,000 lb vertical load at a 24" load center, and taking into consideration the pertinent dimensions of the thing I built, this would result in a tensile load on all 4 bolts combined of about 9,100 lb (or about 2275 lb/bolt). And the shear load on each bolt would be 2,000 lb. Now, if I move that same load out to a load center of 30" (which might be necessary for a big fat lathe), the resultant load on those bolts would be about 2,850 lb -- due to the longer moment arm. At an even longer moment arm of a 48" load center, it would be about 4,575 lb/bolt -- still not close to the capacity of the bolts. These numbers are based on the mast and the loads being vertical, in which case, the height of the mast does not enter the picture. Keeping the whole mess as close to vertical as possible during a lift and move is important, though. Another matter is the possibility of the vertical mast flexing with a load. If need be, this can be fixed with some added stiffeners or truss."

    I will hope that the OP used actual data and calculations for those numbers. If so it is well within the 5X safety factor for overhead lifting. BUT that assumes that the fasteners are properly lubricated and torqued and regularly inspected. That is one reason it is so rare to see a fastener in tension on lifting equipment. If you look at crane booms you will note that threaded fasteners are almost universally in compression or double shear. I realize that a backyard shop will likely never see an OSHA inspection. But if someone gets hurt you will likely deal with a lawsuit. I would keep at least an annual inspection record of those fasteners and their retorquing. Your homeowner's policy likely offers no indemnification for this situation.

  25. #36
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Madera county california usa
    Posts
    2,419
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    21
    Likes (Received)
    599

    Default

    I would have made the horizontal arm even with the mount or low as possible to reduce as much losd to mount leverage as possible.

    Simply do not store on lift when not needed and make a dock someplace to park it.

    Already made...

    Losts of things can go stupid in a hurry with this just due to new moments that allow lots of forces that could be avoided.

  26. #37
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Western CO
    Posts
    379
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    19
    Likes (Received)
    103

    Default

    Nice, but I see it twisting off the carriage or ripping the post off the mount plates with a side load. It is too narrow and that mounting method yikes!

  27. #38
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Iowa
    Posts
    3,153
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    66
    Likes (Received)
    399

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dshore View Post
    Thought I'd share some info and photos of a rigger's boom I recently made for my home shop Hyster lift truck.
    Hi Dale!

    Thanks for posting pix of your boom! I made a fork-mounted boom for quick pick up of long-reach/lightweight loads, which is fine outdoors (and for light loads), but Like yours, my Hyster H50H has no 'free lift', and the backrest cage seems to be rather high, so it obstructs my ability to pick high under low overhead situations.

    I won't jump into the pool of engineering comments... although they're very accurate in many cases, they've already been said, and what you built clearly serves your purposes and circumstances. I'm certain mine will too, and I will likely incorporate many of the concepts identified there, but I can guarantee, that yours will be much better looking than mine, as my engineering and fabrication skills are substantially stronger than my painting skills. ;-)

    And as for the comment about insurance companies indemnifying... if there's an accident, it's been my experience that the homeowner's policy WILL pay out to it's extent, however, the company may choose to terminate the policy immediately after, or raise the rate substantially. If he never lifts anything close to the boom's real capacity, nobody will ever find out it's limits, and nobody will care. As my Dad says, insurance doesn't prevent bad things from happening, and it can't fix them after they do, it's just legalized contract wagering between the customer, and the agency's actuarials. REAL insurance is found between one's ears, and is protecting you 24/7 using your senses, both real, and common. Watch, look, listen, test, measure, observe... stand back, think, and plan ahead- expect things to go wrong, and prepare yourself accordingly. The uneasy feeling in your gut is the best warning you'll ever get.

  28. Likes rbdjr59, tc429 liked this post
  29. #39
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Vershire, Vermont
    Posts
    1,995
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1276
    Likes (Received)
    621

    Default

    Nice work! Like the Grob in the background, too and am envious of all the space you have.

    To some of youse, maybe I missed something, but it seems Dale did a bit of structural analysis on this beast. He'd prob accept an FEA analysis, if anyone were inclined.

  30. #40
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Country
    CANADA
    State/Province
    Alberta
    Posts
    12
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Royldean View Post
    It's amazing how many racecars have gussets like that.
    Its amazing and the exact numbers are not known!


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •