How to move a milling machine like a PRO! - Page 4
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234
Results 61 to 70 of 70
  1. #61
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    10,381
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5843
    Likes (Received)
    4597

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SeeandSee View Post
    That's OK if you have want everything in the shop propped up on blocks. I'd love to see the look on the OSHA guys face when he walked in the shop and noticed a machine sitting up a stack of blocks.:-) Ha, did you learn that process from the Egyptians? Less physical effort? Pry bar and a stack of blocks.. Are you serious? Can I hang that post up on the wall Milacron for a good laugh? LOL
    Milacron .. and his customers, myself included, who'd be doing the laughing, Pilgrim.

    Lest you've forgotten - or never knew, "our" Milacron is a machinery DEALER. Moving goods in, out, sideways, and shuffling between storage locations is the Day Job, not running them.

    And.. folk who trade in machine tools, will, of course, MOVE more of them, and a great deal more often, than those who plunk one down - once - then mostly JF run it for years.

  2. Likes digger doug liked this post
  3. #62
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Cerritos, CA
    Posts
    329
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    111
    Likes (Received)
    132

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ripperj View Post
    My issue with your video is your choice of attire more than anything, no matter how good you are, shorts and sneakers take “pro” out of the picture.
    I work with lots of Pros ( the kind that move 100 ton transformers and Large generator parts worth millions and millions USD
    They all wear heavy pants, most with double knees, safety shoes, leather gloves and hard hats, glasses. And yes it’s required at work, but the standards are much different when you hire them for a side job.


    Edit should read, “but the standards are Not much different “

    And before you say it, you are right, safety shoes aren’t going to help much if drop a lathe on your foot, but they are for when you get tired and drop a skate, hockey stick, Johnson bar , sledge etc.

    If you want to make a video to drum up business, then go the extra mile, wear the gear , get a long sleeve shirt made up with your business logo and name......


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    I agree 100% with ripperj about the attire!!!
    Dude - I live at the beach and wear shorts and no shoes but when I go to my shop I wear the proper attire: canvas pants shirt tucked in and work shoes. This short pants thing has jumped the shark.

  4. #63
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Oklahoma City, OK
    Posts
    3,308
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    573
    Likes (Received)
    1456

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alskdjfhg View Post
    I like that tree trunk for blocking lol.
    Billet oak?

  5. Likes micrometer_50 liked this post
  6. #64
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Tennessee
    Posts
    306
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    51
    Likes (Received)
    166

    Default

    I am in the machinery moving business. I don't consider something "big" until you start getting north of 50 tons. We moved a Mazak Integrex e-1060V/8-II last week, that would be considered a large mill at 75,000lb. We like to move Bridgeport type knee mills from overhead, it at all possible, they just get top heavy when lifting underneath.

    As far as the OP goes, I won't be too hard on him. He didn't get hurt and got the mill moved with what he had. It does bug me when I see people doing stuff like this in shorts and tennis shoes but it's their place and they don't have to follow OHSA rules.

    As for the forks vs crane debate, all our lifts (up to 100,000LB cap) have both forks and booms. I'd say we use the forks about half the time and boom the other half, it just depends on what you are lifting and where it is going. Lots of times, you just don't have the overhead clearance to rig from top. Cranes are nice but they are really limited once you get inside. Lots of our moves are tandem picks (forklift on each end of a long machine), if you are doing a tandem lift and moving any direction other than a straight line, picking from overhead with booms is much better.

    We get called all the time to move items that the owner could move himself just as easy as we can. They call us because they want our insurance. They drop their new machine, they end up with a pile of parts, we drop their new machine and we buy them another one.

  7. #65
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    3,640
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3893
    Likes (Received)
    1813

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cole2534 View Post
    Billet oak?
    Doug fir. OSB works great though. That was 7 years ago. I still have the 20 sheets of OSB I cut into 16" squares that day for cribbing. I keep them neatly stacked on a 32" pallet and they come in handy a few times a year.

  8. #66
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Nevada
    Posts
    27
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7
    Likes (Received)
    4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Monarchist View Post
    Milacron .. and his customers, myself included, who'd be doing the laughing, Pilgrim.

    Lest you've forgotten - or never knew, "our" Milacron is a machinery DEALER. Moving goods in, out, sideways, and shuffling between storage locations is the Day Job, not running them.

    And.. folk who trade in machine tools, will, of course, MOVE more of them, and a great deal more often, than those who plunk one down - once - then mostly JF run it for years.
    Monarchist,

    For a machinery dealer I would like to think he wouldn't be such a smart azz.. Oh well.. I deal with a lot of machinery dealers in the construction business and prolly long before he ever got started. I don't get along with the salesmen mentality though and that might be the rub. We started our first company in the 1960's and our sideline is heavy hauling up to 9 axle loads out west. Tonnage wise prolly well over a few million tons..

    I noticed an attitude on this forum that's kind of exclusive to a select certain few here.. Nothing wrong with that as anyone can chose to stay or leave I guess.. Just saying.. "Pilgrim"

  9. #67
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Country
    UNITED KINGDOM
    Posts
    1,035
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    216
    Likes (Received)
    281

    Default

    Just picked up on this thread ... as said before, waste of 5 minutes ... tea's gone cold now

    "PRO" Pretty Ridiculas Operation

  10. #68
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Melbourne Australia
    Posts
    5,229
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SeeandSee View Post
    For a machinery dealer I would like to think he wouldn't be such a smart azz..
    Oh well.. I deal with a lot of machinery dealers in the construction business and prolly (sp) long before he ever got started. I don't get along with the salesmen mentality though and that might be the rub. We started our first company in the 1960's and our sideline is heavy hauling up to 9 axle loads out west. Tonnage wise prolly (sp) well over a few million tons..

    I noticed an attitude on this forum that's kind of exclusive to a select certain few here.. Nothing wrong with that as anyone can chose to stay or leave I guess.. Just saying.. "Pilgrim"
    There's no softer gentle way to put it, but. You ignorant prick. You do notice your slandering the owner of this forum? Your spouting your bullshit on his dime? Wouldn't the truth of the matter be, your a dozer / low loader type of guy. Tell us again why your on an expert in machinery movement.

    Did you or did you not claim to be a " little shop at home" Why are you bothering us Harry?

    http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...7/#post3007527

    How you Harry Home Shop's are tolerated here is beyond me. I rely on my advise being professional.

    Cheers Phil.

  11. Likes Sachmanram, digger doug liked this post
  12. #69
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Indianapolis
    Posts
    1,232
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    721
    Likes (Received)
    376

    Default

    Tough crowd.

    The good news is this crowd has wisdom, hard-earned wisdom.

    The challenge is to reconcile the wisdom into a decision tree ( headroom? Tight turns? Inclines? Less than 13’ 6” when loaded on truck?)

    Etc. Etc.

    There is concensus, not same as compromise.

    Let’s say the programmers are designing a spreadsheet involving a monthly breakdown. Should the month titles be across the top, or down a side?Programmers are equally split, so the receptionist is asked to break the tie.

    She just wants the guys to get along; she suggests a compromise of running the month titles diagonally.

    Thank you Rachel. You can return to the front desk.

  13. #70
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New York
    Posts
    3,745
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2711
    Likes (Received)
    2377

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Dickman View Post
    I can't help but think of the dufuss dropping his radial arm drill. That was classic
    The Worst Shop Day Ever :-( - YouTube

    This the one? dang!


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •