How to rate the cap. of two forklift on opposing sides of load
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    Default How to rate the cap. of two forklift on opposing sides of load

    I have a 9 x 13 tank coming with a piece of equipment this weekend. It is set to arrive on Sunday so I am trying to plan offloading without any outside assistance. Most components are broken down into manageable parts for shipping, but the tank being 9x13 could potentially pose a problem.

    I am trying to work out in my head how to rate the capacity of a forklift if the load is being supported by another forklift on the opposite side. I want to think that the fork trucks could carry full capacity in this configuration since the load is supported on each end from leaning off center. Just looking for anyones input on this before we get it up in the air, and pull the trailer out from under it. Thanks.

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    if your tank is an evenly distributed load,each fork will take approx half,provided it is level........there is another way to lift and carry unweildy loads not exceeding the lift capacity ,and that is to use a top tension chain.....Ive lifted a rack 30 feet long endways by using a tension chain .....rig the chain,tighten it up with the mast tilt.Must be to a part of the carriage ,if you intend to lift.

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    This is done all the time. The limiting factor is "operator skill".

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    You can lift more than the combined capacity of both forklifts if they are opposing each other. Just comes down to skill of the operators.

    Biggest issue going down is the hydraulics get pretty touchy when you are way over capacity. You really don't want to "bounce" the load by letting go of the lever.

    Going up you have a similar issue where you need to throttle up pretty good and feather the hydraulics while staying in sync with a forklift you can't see.

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    Best to have a third person that bothdrivers can see at the same time to direct them on up and down speeds.
    Also good to have both masts vertical, or just slightly tilted back and don't mess with tilt after that.
    Probably need to mention that both lifts are in neutral with parking brakes on. Once off the truck and load is near ground level the two can drive with the load, not much turning though.

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    I used to do this all the time with the boss on the other fork,and he was always trying to "speed up",and you had to read his (tiny) mind,and keep up with what he was doing,or drop a million dollar load.He used to do the same with the crane,he would lift while you were rigging the slings to speed you up......no wonder he s a billionaire.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Garwood View Post
    You can lift more than the combined capacity of both forklifts if they are opposing each other. Just comes down to skill of the operators.

    Biggest issue going down is the hydraulics get pretty touchy when you are way over capacity. You really don't want to "bounce" the load by letting go of the lever.

    Going up you have a similar issue where you need to throttle up pretty good and feather the hydraulics while staying in sync with a forklift you can't see.
    This is true. You can effectively have the weight center on each forklift right up against the mast, if you keep the forks tilted right and both lifts stay together.

    We do this almost weekly. To do this without problems, you need a flagman to watch and control both lifts. The flagman needs to be the most experienced person on the move, and the operators need to do exactly what flagman tells them.

    Disclaimer- OSHA considers this a "critical lift" and requires you to de-rate the capacity of both forklifts by half. As I said, if done right you can actually exceed the rated capacity of both lifts, but OSHA says otherwise, just so you know.

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    I shifted piles of blacksmith bending plates weighing 6 tone each with two Hyster H 80s......biggest issue was the laneway had speed bumps every 10 yds ,and when one fork went over a bump ,the plate would slide into one of the forks ,and I was worried about busting the mast rollers.Next lot ,tied old tyres to the carriage,problem solved.......we moved all the plates out and into the yard,round two corners then loaded them up on a trailer..... four plates for a barely legal load.A very profitable days work ,with the scrapyard not far away.Got the plates free, just for moving them.

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    We have unloaded in similar fashion. Operator sill still #1 absolutely, but we often have the trailer pull out once just clear (when possible). Allowing operators more ability to use more of their senses. Sounds weird I admit but it works for us.

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    Put a chunk of wood under the mast on both sides after you rock it back towards the seat put block under the mast on the ground then rock the mast back straight if you don’t have to move forklift it will lift till the hydraulics give out
    Don


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

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    Quote Originally Posted by D Nelson View Post
    Put a chunk of wood under the mast on both sides after you rock it back towards the seat put block under the mast on the ground then rock the mast back straight if you don’t have to move forklift it will lift till the hydraulics give out
    Don


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    Then how do you move the load if the weight is not on the tires but on the wood block under the mast?

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    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    I shifted piles of blacksmith bending plates weighing 6 tone each with two Hyster H 80s......biggest issue was the laneway had speed bumps every 10 yds ,and when one fork went over a bump ,the plate would slide into one of the forks ,and I was worried about busting the mast rollers.Next lot ,tied old tyres to the carriage,problem solved.......we moved all the plates out and into the yard,round two corners then loaded them up on a trailer..... four plates for a barely legal load.A very profitable days work ,with the scrapyard not far away.Got the plates free, just for moving them.
    I loaded a pair of 20K lb lasers with two 8K Hysters. One Hyster was brand new. The other was a clapped out 1960's model. Not fun, but it worked. Had about 2" each side to snake the trailer between the masts. Had a really good truck driver that day thankfully.

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    Thanks for everyone's input to confirm what I was thinking. I have a neighbor with a 14k Hyster that I may ask to help out for the ease of moving this where we need it, but glad to know that i am safe getting it off the trailer if we can't get any help tomorrow.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob F. View Post
    Then how do you move the load if the weight is not on the tires but on the wood block under the mast?
    Drive the truck out from under it get it down to ground level then get your blocks out from it


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    [QUOTE=D Nelson;3423462]Put a chunk of wood under the mast on both sides after you rock it back towards the seat put block under the mast on the ground then rock the mast back straight if you don’t have to move forklift it will lift till the hydraulics give out
    Don

    That’s how we’d change a drive tire but never heard of making lifts that way.

    Regards
    John

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    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    He used to do the same with the crane,he would lift while you were rigging the slings to speed you up......no wonder he s a billionaire.
    OT: Is that tongue in cheek? Typically run into this, owners tripping over dollars to pick up pennies.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob F. View Post
    Then how do you move the load if the weight is not on the tires but on the wood block under the mast?
    OP’s describing a lift where the objective is to unload a trailer which is then driven out from under the load.

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    To change the topic of the thread. I have trouble seeing any situation were that blocking method would work and be practical. Once you block it you can no longer move the lift truck, and I do not see a situation were i can get under a load still having space to tilt far enough back/forth to block the mast. I also would not let anyone climb under the load to pull the blocks.

    What circumstances would you consider this method of lifting used?

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    Quote Originally Posted by D Nelson View Post
    Drive the truck out from under it get it down to ground level then get your blocks out from it


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    So you will have two forklifts with masts on blocks, with a large load sitting on the forks and then tilt the mast forward and back to get the blocks out?

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    No then you remove the blocks get it on a set of skates and do whatever you want with it. With a small lift
    Don


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