Longer Chain for a Lever Chain Hoist
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 24
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    371
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    21
    Likes (Received)
    107

    Default Longer Chain for a Lever Chain Hoist

    I preparing to improve my setup for moving equipment in and out of my home basement through by bulkhead. This is a standard Bilco with precast stairs setup. I've been some lowering down of equipment <500lbs using a set of wooden rails a sled pallet and ropes. This has worked very well, but I now have a 1300lbs item to move that is more than I am comfortable with my rope setup. I have a couple large trees to use as anchors.

    I was originally thinking of a cable electric hoist. However for a less expensive and easier to move around setup, I could do a lever chain hoist. I've never touched one tough. I would need to swap out the chain on most for enough working length.

    Frankly, I would probably go for this Horror Frieght one:
    Lever Chain Hoist - 1-1/2 Ton

    Would I run into any issues swapping the chain with a 20ft 5/16" grade 80? Am I going to hate moving things raising or lowering 15ft of chain?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    8,797
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    632
    Likes (Received)
    4522

    Default

    Put a chain on your pallet so you can change hook positions on the tail of the chain. Using your chain hoist, lower the pallet most of the length of your chain. Now use another chain hooked to a deadman and hook to the pallet chain. Lower the pallet until the new chain gets tight. Now you can reposition your chain hoist to use the full length of the chain again. Repeat until finished.

    If you think the above is to much effort, buy another chain hoist instead of a longer chain. Chain hoists will work fine in series for more travel, or parallel for more capacity.

  3. Likes digger doug, Ray Behner, 52 Ford liked this post
  4. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    288
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    80

    Default

    What they call a lever hoist is really just a come along that is meant for pulling horizontally. A chain fall will be easier to use than constantly moving a lever back and forth.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Olympia, Wa
    Posts
    802
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    345
    Likes (Received)
    257

    Default

    In my experience a come along is for horizontal loads and a lever hoist can be used for lifting, they are different animals. Also I would take a wild guess that the chain on that harbor freight lever hoist is some weird metric size.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    380
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5
    Likes (Received)
    113

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by newtonsapple View Post
    I preparing to improve my setup for moving equipment in and out of my home basement through by bulkhead. This is a standard Bilco with precast stairs setup. I've been some lowering down of equipment <500lbs using a set of wooden rails a sled pallet and ropes. This has worked very well, but I now have a 1300lbs item to move that is more than I am comfortable with my rope setup. I have a couple large trees to use as anchors.

    I was originally thinking of a cable electric hoist. However for a less expensive and easier to move around setup, I could do a lever chain hoist. I've never touched one tough. I would need to swap out the chain on most for enough working length.

    Frankly, I would probably go for this Horror Frieght one:
    Lever Chain Hoist - 1-1/2 Ton

    Would I run into any issues swapping the chain with a 20ft 5/16" grade 80? Am I going to hate moving things raising or lowering 15ft of chain?
    I think you’ll find the chain type on the hoists is hard to match, and it needs to be a correct fit to work.

    You will also find having excess chain on a lever hoist normally is annoying, though at least most of them can free spin when not under load.

    For that kind of stair you probably only need 15ft of working length or so right? To get an item from the bottom to fully out the top?

    I think a lever hoist would work but chain mgmt could be annoying. I have a grip hoist type puller which uses wire rope, it is very good for this kind of thing. Tirfor or clones (mine is Jet made in Japan).

  7. Likes ranchak liked this post
  8. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Kentucky
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    2

    Default

    I work in the crane and hoist industry, so I probably dont know what im talking about and you shouldnt take my advice. That being said, I really like lever hoists, i find them more manageable and versatile than a standard chain fall hoist, and it is entirely doable to replace a load chain for a longer one, just be sure you get a proper chain that is made for lifting. Lever hoist are designed to be used in any position, pulling or lifting/lowering and they can be used in places that chain falls are not easily used, that being said, some applications like going from one level to another, especially if working alone a chain fall with a long enough pull chain would likely prove more useful for that application. The problem with a lever hoist is that it either has to be worked from the load or the fixed end side giving you less option for working it if its in a transitional point of the lift. Also, working a chain fall is less tiring/aggravating for long distances than cranking the lever, especially if you have any tendonitis like me.

    Just a note, true lifting chain is specifically rated for lifting/lowering, not saying you cant get away with using any old chain that should be rated for the loads your going to pick up with the frequency you plan on using it, but you should be aware so you can make an informed decision.

  9. Likes john.k, Garwood liked this post
  10. #7
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    371
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    21
    Likes (Received)
    107

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by feralghoul88 View Post
    I work in the crane and hoist industry, so I probably dont know what im talking about and you shouldnt take my advice. That being said, I really like lever hoists, i find them more manageable and versatile than a standard chain fall hoist, and it is entirely doable to replace a load chain for a longer one, just be sure you get a proper chain that is made for lifting. Lever hoist are designed to be used in any position, pulling or lifting/lowering and they can be used in places that chain falls are not easily used, that being said, some applications like going from one level to another, especially if working alone a chain fall with a long enough pull chain would likely prove more useful for that application. The problem with a lever hoist is that it either has to be worked from the load or the fixed end side giving you less option for working it if its in a transitional point of the lift. Also, working a chain fall is less tiring/aggravating for long distances than cranking the lever, especially if you have any tendonitis like me.

    Just a note, true lifting chain is specifically rated for lifting/lowering, not saying you cant get away with using any old chain that should be rated for the loads your going to pick up with the frequency you plan on using it, but you should be aware so you can make an informed decision.
    Thanks to everyone for the input. Despite the lowering/raising aspect, this is more like a horizontal setup because I will be standing outside on the ground operating the hoist. It's really like a 45deg move. I am not sure a regular chain fall hoist would work in this setup.

    Lowering with a lever chain hoist looks a little more straight forward than a come along.

    The replacement chain I would get would be 5/16 grade 80 for lifting. I need about 15ft of travel from top to bottom. The hoist will be anchored back to the trees using a 40' 7/16" premade wire rope sling.

    I think I will want to elevate the attachment point of the hoist to put it more inline with the slope of the stairs. While the bulkhead stairs should be sturdy, I don't like putting additional load prying them from the house. It will also prevent the chain from rubbing against the edge of the bulkhead. I am considering using my 2 ton engine hoist to elevate this point. In the basement I will use a heavy duty ratchet strap connected to a concrete anchor to pull the load down until weight is on the lowering setup. There is a sketchy point when the load teeters over onto the slope.

    What does everyone think about this approach?

  11. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    22,783
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by newtonsapple View Post
    Thanks to everyone for the input. Despite the lowering/raising aspect, this is more like a horizontal setup because I will be standing outside on the ground operating the hoist. It's really like a 45deg move. I am not sure a regular chain fall hoist would work in this setup.

    Lowering with a lever chain hoist looks a little more straight forward than a come along.

    The replacement chain I would get would be 5/16 grade 80 for lifting. I need about 15ft of travel from top to bottom. The hoist will be anchored back to the trees using a 40' 7/16" premade wire rope sling.

    I think I will want to elevate the attachment point of the hoist to put it more inline with the slope of the stairs. While the bulkhead stairs should be sturdy, I don't like putting additional load prying them from the house. It will also prevent the chain from rubbing against the edge of the bulkhead. I am considering using my 2 ton engine hoist to elevate this point. In the basement I will use a heavy duty ratchet strap connected to a concrete anchor to pull the load down until weight is on the lowering setup. There is a sketchy point when the load teeters over onto the slope.

    What does everyone think about this approach?
    I think you should buy a pick up truck, chain the thing to the back bumper (no trees involved), and put the truck in "drive".....

  12. #9
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    371
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    21
    Likes (Received)
    107

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    I think you should buy a pick up truck, chain the thing to the back bumper (no trees involved), and put the truck in "drive".....
    Watched the neighbors do this while I was young. It was a piano down the bulkhead and a rambler station wagon. Went pretty much how you would expect...they made QUICK work of the job and the piano was all of a sudden in the basement. I recall going down there to play and there were some extra 2x4 installed to hold it up.

  13. Likes 52 Ford liked this post
  14. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    22,783
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by newtonsapple View Post
    Watched the neighbors do this while I was young. It was a piano down the bulkhead and a rambler station wagon. Went pretty much how you would expect...they made QUICK work of the job and the piano was all of a sudden in the basement. I recall going down there to play and there were some extra 2x4 installed to hold it up.
    That was a "Rambler station wagon" not an f-150 now eh ?

  15. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Modesto, CA USA
    Posts
    8,948
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    1774

    Default

    I have an old Yale lever chain hoist that uses motorcycle type chain. That kind of chain is easier to keep untangled and to roll up neatly for storage. But if it gets looped up it is harder to unsnag from itself.
    Bill D.
    similar to this one. No idea on age but it is all cast iron, no tin or plastic.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails yale-hoist.jpg  

  16. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Country
    AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    5,091
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    35
    Likes (Received)
    1841

    Default

    A lever hoist is much more handy for use than a chain fall/chain block......mainly because there are a lot fewer chains to tangle up.........Now ,for the extended fall,my suggestion is to buy off fbay a two fall type (with a hook block) eliminate the hook block ,and you have a single extra long load chain.......replacing the chain is problematic because its generally of different dimensions to standard T80 chain,standard chain not fitting the sprocket properly.

  17. #13
    Join Date
    May 2021
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    346
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    379
    Likes (Received)
    89

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Blazemaster View Post
    Also I would take a wild guess that the chain on that harbor freight lever hoist is some weird metric size.
    Depends on what set of calipers you measure it with. Could be some weird SAE size, too. Longer Chain for a Lever Chain Hoist

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk

  18. #14
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    371
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    21
    Likes (Received)
    107

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 52 Ford View Post
    Depends on what set of calipers you measure it with. Could be some weird SAE size, too. Longer Chain for a Lever Chain Hoist

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
    I said in the first post that it the Harbor Freight 1.5 ton lever hoist takes 5/16ths chain. My post was initially just to understand that hoists don't take some magic chain other than appropriately rated for lifting. Sometimes there are weird conventions, like hoists use a special spec of chain with better weld dimension control. It doesn't seem like that is the case. Chain isn't exactly high dimensionally precision stuff. The magic is in weld quality, steel, and heat treat.

    It does seem like I should be able to track down a 2nd hand name brand model with a 15ft chain for about what a HF and replacement chain costs.

    Only other thing to work out is how to arrange the appropriate angle of approach and the teeter totter point. Lifting the support line to about 4ft at 4ft away from the start of the bulkhead should be good for the angle. Still thinking of using the engine lift for that. Putting the sliding skid on some lumber that can be jacked up to better match the stair angle would manage the teeter totter issue.

  19. #15
    Join Date
    May 2021
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    346
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    379
    Likes (Received)
    89

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by newtonsapple View Post
    I said in the first post that it the Harbor Freight 1.5 ton lever hoist takes 5/16ths chain. My post was initially just to understand that hoists don't take some magic chain other than appropriately rated for lifting. Sometimes there are weird conventions, like hoists use a special spec of chain with better weld dimension control. It doesn't seem like that is the case. Chain isn't exactly high dimensionally precision stuff. The magic is in weld quality, steel, and heat treat.

    It does seem like I should be able to track down a 2nd hand name brand model with a 15ft chain for about what a HF and replacement chain costs.

    Only other thing to work out is how to arrange the appropriate angle of approach and the teeter totter point. Lifting the support line to about 4ft at 4ft away from the start of the bulkhead should be good for the angle. Still thinking of using the engine lift for that. Putting the sliding skid on some lumber that can be jacked up to better match the stair angle would manage the teeter totter issue.
    I must have missed it - why chain vs cable? Just curious; either way will get the job done.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk

  20. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,691
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    343
    Likes (Received)
    662

    Default

    You are way over thinking this. Find a buddy with a Jeep or truck with a winch, snatch block the line to the tree and get it done.
    If no winch to be found get some good rope and snatch block off of tree and pull with pickup.

  21. #17
    Join Date
    May 2021
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    346
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    379
    Likes (Received)
    89

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by true temper View Post
    You are way over thinking this. Find a buddy with a Jeep or truck with a winch, snatch block the line to the tree and get it done.
    If no winch to be found get some good rope and snatch block off of tree and pull with pickup.
    Boat winch. I keep one in my truck. SUPER versatile


    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk

  22. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Bellingham, WA
    Posts
    4,554
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1126
    Likes (Received)
    2592

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 52 Ford View Post
    Boat winch. I keep one in my truck. SUPER versatile


    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
    I have several boat winches used for lifting fairly light loads and I do very much like the speed and versatility of the winches. One caveat is that little toggle that you snap up to allow UNwinding the winch. I have fixed mine so that they cannot be over-centered into the release/unwind position. I fix them so they have to be held open and if you let go the lever moves to the locked position. I think this is an important safety feature. If that winch handle starts to freewheel as the load descends, I can guarantee you you will not be putting your hand in its arc to grab it. Even if you were foolish enough to try, you'd never be able to stop the out of control winch and you'd likely seriously injure ytour hand.

    A worm gear winch is a different matter as it will not freewheel and is still reasonably fast. I have two of those on two different and seriously heavy items that I need to lift. I drive them with drill motors. Works well. Using nylon strap as opposed to cable is much nicer to handle but not as good for a snatch-block situation.

    Denis

  23. #19
    Join Date
    May 2021
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    346
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    379
    Likes (Received)
    89

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dgfoster View Post
    I have several boat winches used for lifting fairly light loads and I do very much like the speed and versatility of the winches. One caveat is that little toggle that you snap up to allow UNwinding the winch. I have fixed mine so that they cannot be over-centered into the release/unwind position. I fix them so they have to be held open and if you let go the lever moves to the locked position. I think this is an important safety feature. If that winch handle starts to freewheel as the load descends, I can guarantee you you will not be putting your hand in its arc to grab it. Even if you were foolish enough to try, you'd never be able to stop the out of control winch and you'd likely seriously injure ytour hand.

    A worm gear winch is a different matter as it will not freewheel and is still reasonably fast. I have two of those on two different and seriously heavy items that I need to lift. I drive them with drill motors. Works well. Using nylon strap as opposed to cable is much nicer to handle but not as good for a snatch-block situation.

    Denis
    On my boat winches, the handle is removable and just held on with a nut. Sorta lazy how they have it all coupled together - there's a clutch pack that you tighten up with basically a bolt with a plastic knob on it. When it's tight, the electric motor and it's gearing is coupled to the rest of the gears and, of course, the spool. If you tighten it a whole lot, it acts as a brake, medium torque and the electric motor works, no torque and its in free spool/manual.

    Worm drive IS way better for manual work. I found the boat winches in the barn - didn't exactly shop for them.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk

  24. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Country
    AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    5,091
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    35
    Likes (Received)
    1841

    Default

    I knew a guy ran a surplus business at the back of an old house ...access for heavy stuff was via a 1 in 3 slope railway powered by a old style open gears boat winch just in off the footpath.....business was there since WW2,Frank died at 92,and the old stone house was yuppie gold....still had gaslights fitted ....Anyhoo,house and land were sold for several millions.....many times what was earned from all the hard work of winding stuff up and down the inclined railway.....new owners hired a 200ton crane to swing in scrap bins over the house to clear the yard.

  25. Likes 52 Ford liked this post

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •