metamorph---genesis of bespoke machine hauler - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    I had two 1982 Fords with silver 6v92 TAs on contract towing animal feed pressure tanks.In the Fords ,the motors were accessable ,unlike the same trucks with BC Cummins ,where 2/3 of the motor was in the cab,and even the heads were a hassle to get at....All the GM problems were cured in the last 92s.,and they were fantastic motors ,and with cheap parts....and according to my GM 92 series manual the 8v92 TA is 2400lbs.....and they used no more oil than a Cummins.If a GM uses oil,its time for new liners and pistons.

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    "Bunker C" is the tar like fuel.

    I only heard of that being burned in a boiler, but let's see if someone has some evidence
    of using it elsewhere.

    Tugs (and other boats) I see are using the engines to spin alternators, thence on to
    "pods" electric motors outboard...think "MinnKota on roids"

    I was watching some video, tugboat captain in swivel seat with joysticks, the little swisil sticks
    controlling VFD's and such to control the boat, much like a skid steer.
    Large vessels use #6 fuel oil aka bunker c. It has to be heated for it to flow otherwise it's the consistency of asphalt. Tugs and smaller vessels use regular #2.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post
    What fer boat had these power units?

    I could see a tug using it as main power, but these must be freighters that you are talking about?

    Don't those burn a heavier - crude type fuel?



    ----------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox
    Navy and Coast Gaurd Frigates used to use the 149's for gen power. They all got replaced with V12 Cat's a decade or two ago though. The V12 Cat's are all electronic (not reliable electronics) and were probably a big part of the reason why most of the frigates have been used for target practice now.

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    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    I had two 1982 Fords with silver 6v92 TAs on contract towing animal feed pressure tanks.In the Fords ,the motors were accessable ,unlike the same trucks with BC Cummins ,where 2/3 of the motor was in the cab,and even the heads were a hassle to get at....All the GM problems were cured in the last 92s.,and they were fantastic motors ,and with cheap parts....and according to my GM 92 series manual the 8v92 TA is 2400lbs.....and they used no more oil than a Cummins.If a GM uses oil,its time for new liners and pistons.
    I've never weighed a 8V92. Always thought they were 3000+ lbs though. BC Cummins, the engine itself, is under 2000 lbs. All the shit on the engine puts it around 2500.

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    Assuming JH1 new toy has a 3.1 or 3.5 axle ratio,he ll be cruising the interstate at 100mph....like Smokey and the Bandit on roids.....steroids that is ,not the other kind.

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  9. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    Assuming JH1 new toy has a 3.1 or 3.5 axle ratio,he ll be cruising the interstate at 100mph....like Smokey and the Bandit on roids.....steroids that is ,not the other kind.
    Both our large trucks are geared to 65mph, the tender does get there quicker though lol

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    Default 8V92 video

    cold start 50 degF

    if you are not a two stroke fan---move along---nothing to see here


    YouTube

    YouTube

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    What was the noise before the start?
    Just a chattery solenoid on the glow plugs circuit?


    ------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

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    low air pressure circuit alarm

    no red plugs on this unit



    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post
    What was the noise before the start?
    Just a chattery solenoid on the glow plugs circuit?


    ------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

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    Quote Originally Posted by dalmatiangirl61 View Post
    I would say deafness in any dog is a flaw, but yes they can still be trained. OT- How many of you know why dals are associated with firetrucks? No cheating using google!
    They were used to help keep the horses clam ,back when things were horse drawn. And by the way I had a round dozen Dals from the late 90s til the last one past in '16 and not a one was deaf!! Some of the best dogs ever !

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    Local fire dept got a hand-me down pumper from NYC after 9/11. Only red truck I drive. Not a very fun or pleasant experience but when duty calls.. to the point, check the frame rails and hangers before you get to invested in it. Preferably magnaflux them around the holes. We just ordered a new pumper due to said problem.

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    As for my moniker, I used to do dal rescue, when you have 5 dals the neighbors start calling you names[/QUOTE]

    I too was into Dal rescue and for about 8 years I also had 5 or so Dals around along with 4 Cockers .

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    Had a '51 Seagrave 906 CDI pumper a few years ago as one of my toys. About 3-4 MPG driven lightly ,muffler not required on fire trucks around here,talked pretty good on straight pipe.
    OX That was a V-12 with 12 plugs per side you were looking at. Also many FT were powered by Hall-Scott straight 6's 855-935-1091 CID,also thirsty beasts.

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    No glow plugs in a GM,if you need heat for a start ,then the choice is a giant flamethrower in one of the airbox handhole covers ,or a ether capsule unit......we used to start the GMs in freezing temps ,out in the open ,no worries ....and some of them were made in the 1950s ....good batteries is all you need ......Anyhoo ,being a firetruck ,it will have a lekky blockheater,so you can turn out in an instant.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnEvans View Post
    OX That was a V-12 with 12 plugs per side you were looking at. Also many FT were powered by Hall-Scott straight 6's 855-935-1091 CID,also thirsty beasts.
    This dated back a cpl decades before the "v" anything was built.
    I would guess it in the 1915 to late 20's on the way outside.
    It was the better part of 40 yrs ago when I seen it, but I'm pretty sure it was inline 12 as I was amazed to think of the crankshaft down in that thing!

    It may have had 12 cyls, but the motor - as well as the whole truck was a baby.
    I was looking "down" into the engine bay.


    ------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post
    This dated back a cpl decades before the "v" anything was built.
    I would guess it in the 1915 to late 20's on the way outside.
    It was the better part of 40 yrs ago when I seen it, but I'm pretty sure it was inline 12 as I was amazed to think of the crankshaft down in that thing!

    It may have had 12 cyls, but the motor - as well as the whole truck was a baby.
    I was looking "down" into the engine bay.


    ------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox
    V engines are older than you think, actually a lot of stuff we think of as "modern design" traces its history back to the early 1900's First V8 in 1903.

    Steve

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve in SoCal View Post
    V engines are older than you think, actually a lot of stuff we think of as "modern design" traces its history back to the early 1900's First V8 in 1903.

    Steve
    Ditto 4 valve OHC hemis Peugeot had em in the 20’s , then Harry Miller , Leo Goosen and the follow on Fred Offefnhauser products used the design.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve in SoCal View Post
    V engines are older than you think, actually a lot of stuff we think of as "modern design" traces its history back to the early 1900's First V8 in 1903.

    Steve

    Well, to this day they still make a big stink about the first V8 by Ford in the mid 30's.

    ???


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    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

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  28. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post
    Well, to this day they still make a big stink about the first V8 by Ford in the mid 30's.

    ???


    -----------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox
    Ford was the first mass produced V-8 ,hell Chevy had a V-8 in '17 1917 that is !!

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnEvans View Post
    Ford was the first mass produced V-8 ,hell Chevy had a V-8 in '17 1917 that is !!
    Yes, now that you mentioned it, the T.V. program I watched on it, was how Ford's designers took the cost out of the design.

    IIRC allot had to with the coring of the casting, or lack of coring needed.

    I don't know if it was also the first application of Ford's cast iron cranks as well.


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