Moving 800 pound lathe across state
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 31
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Arizona
    Posts
    55
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    8
    Likes (Received)
    6

    Default Moving 800 pound lathe across state

    So I've been looking for over a month trying to find the perfect lathe. I've been going back and forth between 3 in 1s (you guys convinced me against that lol) or doing it right and I think I've found one that works. Unfortunately it's about 800 pounds and 2 hours away in Prescott, AZ. I am in Scottsdale, AZ. So I'm trying to figure out the best way to move it. I have a Nissan Xterra. I am thinking I could install a tow kit on it and rent a drop bed trailor. The guy can lift the lathe on to the trailer with a cherry picker and then when I get home I will use a drop bar to lift it on a dolly and roll it off. I don't have a cherry picker. I am trying to do this the most economical way possible as I'm already over budget. I could rent a uhaul but they charge per mile and that would add up. Any suggestions you have would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
    Posts
    11,736
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    51
    Likes (Received)
    8982

    Default

    Try a hobbyist forum.

  3. Likes Mark Leigh liked this post
  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Navasota / Whitehall Texas
    Posts
    3,623
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2650
    Likes (Received)
    2005

    Default

    I'm surprised that your SUV does not already have a reciever hitch on it.

    A drop bed trailer is the way to go. I've hauled one from Houston to Kansas and Dallas about 5 times now. They pull great and load easy.

    I would suggest that you install a couple of 4x4's under the lathe and bolt the feet to them so you can just use pipes to roll the machine off the trailer. the closer you keep the machine to the ground the more stable it will be. The 4x4's protect the legs/pedestals and make a good surface for the pipes to roll on.

    I would suggest you have lots of help when moving the lathe and take it slow and deliberate. Lathes are always top heavy and have a nasty habit of turning over, breaking shafts, levers and bodys...

  5. Likes kenh, Derek Smalls liked this post
  6. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    marysville ohio
    Posts
    9,425
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2708
    Likes (Received)
    6260

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Aykfc View Post
    So I've been looking for over a month trying to find the perfect lathe. I've been going back and forth between 3 in 1s (you guys convinced me against that lol) or doing it right and I think I've found one that works. Unfortunately it's about 800 pounds and 2 hours away in Prescott, AZ. I am in Scottsdale, AZ. So I'm trying to figure out the best way to move it. I have a Nissan Xterra. I am thinking I could install a tow kit on it and rent a drop bed trailor. The guy can lift the lathe on to the trailer with a cherry picker and then when I get home I will use a drop bar to lift it on a dolly and roll it off. I don't have a cherry picker. I am trying to do this the most economical way possible as I'm already over budget. I could rent a uhaul but they charge per mile and that would add up. Any suggestions you have would be appreciated.
    Back seats out of the xtera. plywood in. sit the mini lathe on the plywood. Strap around mini lathe hooked to the bumper to prevent the mini lathe from flying if you stop hard or crash on the way home. A 800 lb lathe is not a heavy lathe, my 13x30 Holbrook is over 4x that and it's not heavy.

  7. Likes Rock6.3, chickenfarmer, digger doug liked this post
  8. #5
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Pittsford, NY
    Posts
    1,040
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    717
    Likes (Received)
    668

    Default

    I moved a cabinet base South bend 10K that's a little lighter than that.

    I used prybars, wedges, and blocks to pick the lathe high enough to get a frame underneath it. Pick one end up with a prybar, put a 3/8" piece of plywood underneath. Go to the other end and repeat. Do this enough times to get the 2x6 rails underneath. Make sure you are always picking the lathe straight up on each end. DO NOT try to pick up a corner.

    2012-04-25_15-06-05_974.jpg

    If you look at the picture, you can see the retractable wheels that I made to pick up the frame and roll it, and the winch on the front of the trailer used to pull the lathe up on the trailer and to control the lathe running off the trailer (it's a tilt bed trailer). I also screwed wooden blocks to the deck of the trailer to keep it from sliding around.

    The winch is a worm gear winch, so it couldn't get away from me, and the centerline of the wheels is about 7" or 8" outside the base of the lathe on both sides, as lathes are very top heavy. The wheels were overkill, but I had a welder and time, and they worked very well. I'd turn the pipe with a pipe wrench and the end of the lathe would rise up on the casters. I'd pin the pipe through the mountings and the lathe would roll on the casters. I'd take the tension off with the wrench, pull the pin, and lower it off the casters when I wanted it to be still. The lathe was never more than about 1/2" off the ground.

    2012-05-22_18-19-08_777.jpg

    It is very important to make your skid significantly wider than the lathe.

  9. Likes Mark Leigh liked this post
  10. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    The warm desert of Phoenix Arizona
    Posts
    1,457
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    330
    Likes (Received)
    508

    Default

    When moving a lathe you have several options.... Move it whole or take some of it apart.
    Im not familiar with the nissan xterra interior. The Ford escape I have has hauled a couple Logans over the years.

    I layed down the back seat. Cut a couple hunks of plywood to protect the cargo area. And took stuff off the lathe til I could lift and load the parts.

    Make sure to take plenty of rags and hand cleaning supplies. It is scary how dirty you can get taking apart a metal lathe.

    On a little different note.
    If you are buying a lathe from Prescott.... unless it is someone you know... you are most likely gonna pay extra for the address. Most lathes in northern Az bring a premium. The retired local population keep the hobby stuff priced up there. So unless you know it is worth the effort & price ya might wanna keep watching.

    Recently as in the last year or two there has been dry spell for hobby machines in the Phoenix area. There are a bunch of them out there.... just waiting to be found.

    And the last advice I have for you.....
    IF and only IF you are healthy and sane.....
    You can try searching for a lathe from the weirdos on Offerup
    There is a grizzly 12 X 36 on there now. Like everything else listed on there it seems okay at the first glance.... But my personal experiences with buying from offerup ads is the weird will come out before you know it.

    YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED!!! (about the weird on offerup)

  11. #7
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    991
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    181
    Likes (Received)
    356

    Default

    I have a Nissan Pathfinder and have moved a half dozen 800 pound machines without issue. Any of the lathes in that weight class with removable legs just take apart and forget the trailer. The hardest pare is lifting into the back of your SUV. Some of the parts are awkward but not heavy. The Logans as mentioned, disassembled two men can easily lift the components. I've taken apart two logans and loaded them into the Pathfinder and one into my 240SX hatchback, by myself. Take along your tools, some plywood and 2x4s as mentioned and a friend.

  12. Likes digger doug liked this post
  13. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Posts
    13,228
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    6615
    Likes (Received)
    2561

    Default

    First off... go spend $250 at Horror Fright and buy a cherry picker/engine hoist and some light nylon lifting straps. Get the folding one. As your shop expands, and it will, you are going to find the hoist invaluable. Then you go get the machine, come home and unload it. Easy.

    As for getting the machine, I'd ask a friend with a pickup to drive up there and load it or haul a trailer. Buy gas and a meal and you'll still be cheaper than renting. Also will have somebody to chat with on the drive. Rigging the lathe to get it in the SUV hatch may be impossible, given the boom of the hoist will also have to go in there. Open truck or trailer is absolutely the better way to go.

    Do some reading on this forum about rigging a lathe. Preferred method is to rig it from inside the bed, as it is impossible to flip over that way. Also don't bend up the leadscrew or drive shafts.

  14. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Arizona
    Posts
    55
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    8
    Likes (Received)
    6

    Default

    The lathe is a Logan 1875H with the underdrive cabinet stand and the motor at the bottom. 3 phase motor with phase converter. Runs on 220v single phase. Quick change gearbox. Currently using it for business and wants to get a bigger lathe. Asking 1300. It seems to be in good condition as far as I can tell. It comes with lots of tooling. It's about 20x56. Approximately 36 inches tall with stand and lathe. He advised I don't take it apart so it won't fit in the xterra. Unfortunately the xterra didn't come standard with the tow package.

  15. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Asheville, NC
    Posts
    2,425
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1196
    Likes (Received)
    1137

    Default

    I bought a South Bend Heavy 10 on a cabinet without knowing what it was. I showed up 50 miles out in the wilds at the end of a dirt road with a 1988 Ford Festiva. I took it all to pieces and put it in the Festiva and carefully brought it home. I looked up the weight when I got home, 1050 pounds.

    http://carphotos.cardomain.com/ride_...1_original.jpg

    As it was filthy and needed to be disassembles and cleaned, I was ahead of the game when I got home.

    If you go the take it apart route, take photos and bring strong bags to put screws and bolts in. Tie or tape the bags to the parts they come from or make notes and put in bag.

    Paul

  16. Likes Derek Smalls liked this post
  17. #11
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    991
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    181
    Likes (Received)
    356

    Default

    You can probably take the lathe off the stand and get it into your SUV but I agree now with using a truck or trailer so lifting is vertical. A truck bed is rather high but I've done it with a 13" lathe and a cherry picker so just depends on the truck and lift. I usually lift the machine then back the truck under it. Most cherry pickers don't roll very well.

  18. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    netherlands Asten
    Posts
    850
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    545
    Likes (Received)
    365

    Default

    If it fits in your car when disassembled, then just go ahead and take it off the stand.
    No rocket science to get it apart and together again.
    It will save you money and be safe.

  19. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Hudson Valley, NY
    Posts
    980
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    600

    Default

    There is absolutely no reason to lift or disassemble a lathe like this at all.

    Lag bolt two 4x4's lengthwise to the lathe legs/base to act as skids.
    Get yourself about five pieces of pipe, 3 foot long each to act as rollers. on a lathe this light, you can even use thin walled electrical conduit, it wont crush, yes Ive done it.
    Use a pry bar to get the roller under the skids and then you can literally push it around with one hand, assuming concrete shop floor.
    RENT A DROP DECK TRAILER. The hydraulic type, where the deck goes totally flat to the ground. They are about $50 for the day.
    Safe and easy, Ive moved larger lathes and mills several times safely by myself with this method.

  20. Likes Hardened liked this post
  21. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    marysville ohio
    Posts
    9,425
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2708
    Likes (Received)
    6260

    Default

    You can try searching for a lathe from the weirdos on Offerup
    There is a grizzly 12 X 36 on there now. Like everything else listed on there it seems okay at the first glance.... But my personal experiences with buying from offerup ads is the weird will come out before you know it.

    YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED!!! (about the weird on offerup)[/QUOTE]

    NO GRIZZLY!!!!!!!!!!!!! I worked at a customers shop last week, they had a LSO - lathe shaped object with grizzly on the makers plate. What an absolute and total piece of shit! The carriage was about 10" wide on the front way and 6" on the back.
    The pos would not remove 1/8" off a 1" diameter aluminum with out chattering, You could watch the tool post flex and move all over. Speed changes are a nightmare of belt changes in from the back. not so easy as it was bolted to the bench against the wall. If I could have one free I would not take it!

  22. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,196
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3459
    Likes (Received)
    3645

    Default

    Nice lathe but like all it is tippy to the side and so easy to have an accident. Not a bad idea to through bolt a couple 2x4 or 4x4 to make it double the width. agree a 4x4 sled would drag up a ramp and on rollers drag easy. But Very likely the shop could set it on a trailer for free. Getting it off a wrecker to lift it straight up and then down. You should know someone with a hitch.. and perhaps rent a trailer. Straps need to not go over any sharp edges.good to add a rope or strap so it can not go forward when breaking.

  23. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Oregon
    Posts
    176
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    70
    Likes (Received)
    115

    Default

    Go with APD's suggestion. Cost of getting a hitch, wiring, and the time.. you could go almost any other route and be better off. Plus if you're riding a 2007 or older Xterra with their shit tranny, or got one with the wretched 4-banger or lacking the "tow mode" touch button...

  24. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Florida
    Posts
    342
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    35

    Default

    APD's suggestions are all good. I would bring along a "come-a-long" to pull the lathe on to the trailer. If a drop bed trailer is not available, a tilt bed trailer from one of the local rental shops that has Bobcats or mini excavators would work just as well. Failing that a standard U-Haul trailer will work, bring a couple of mechanic's car ramps, put them under the rear wheels of the tow vehicle and back on to them. That will put the trailer's tailgate just about on the ground. A short well blocked ramp finishes the loading set up. Bring more ratchet straps than you think you will need and use all of them.

    Take the tail stock off the lathe and put it in your vehicle, move the cross slide to the head stock and lock it.

    Plan the work, work the plan and always have an escape path in case the machine starts to tip over. If that happens, LET IT GO, RUN!! You can't stop it, it will squash you like a bug.

    I have moved my lathe and Bridgeport 3 times this way, no blood only one or two small bruises.

    Rick

  25. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    littlestown,pa
    Posts
    1,763
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    72
    Likes (Received)
    20

    Default

    Remove seats
    Plywood
    Take apart engine hoist.
    Strap it to the seat belts ......safety first

    Easy.

    Try putting a Superglide in the backseat of a mid 70s Datsun B-210

    Take the wheels off. Take the seat out. But it handles like a pig on the Autobahn.....oh, and the doors don't close all the way.

  26. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,196
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3459
    Likes (Received)
    3645

    Default

    Take care even hire some help if needed as parts to replace broken are expensive and can be hard to find. 800 lbs is like a big snow machine but way more easy to tip over. Doesn't hurt to have some jack stands to be sure a trailer does not tip with weight off balance point.

    I have jacked up my trailer so the trailer floor angle was even with the rear gate ramp.. then with a come along let out enough to let a machine go back to slide or pinch, but with the come along limiting the travel to a couple inches at a time. Yes having jack stand to hold angle and tires blocked form roll..good to stay clear of the fall zone as if it wants to fall you can not stop it with your body weight except to get smashed..

  27. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Modesto, CA USA
    Posts
    7,013
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    1180

    Default

    Since it is three phase look into getting a vfd and not using the rotary phase converter.
    You should be able to buy a cherry picker engine hoist for about $120 on craigs list. Consider a gantry crane with a chain hoist for more money but easier to use.
    Once the lathe is in the air do not try to move it on wheels. Back the truck or trailer under it. To unload hoist the load and drive the truck/trailer away. Then lower it onto pipes or a wheeled skid.
    Bill D.
    I moved my 1750 pound harrison lathe with wheeled skids similar to these plans below. I made mine from 2x12 with four casters bolted at each end. I made them just under 36" long so they can go through the man door into my shop.
    http://www.anf.nildram.co.uk/worksho...00_moving.html


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •