Moving a kick press
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  1. #1
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    Default Moving a kick press

    Moving two small kick presses on stands, solo out of a ground level shop. Similar to Famco #12. Was considering tipping them up on to a dolly. Suggestions? No pallet jack.

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    I've moved lighter kick press's around with a dolly. Heavier ones like the Famco should move that way fine too if you're comfortable keeping them balanced.

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    Any overhead hoist points in the shop? I looked and couldn't find a #12 easily, are these 200lb presses or 550 lb presses?

    On the low end a refrigerator truck could be used with some care. On the high end I wouldn't attempt it.

    If you could lift them straight up with a hoist point then lower onto a pallet base your day might get easier. Recommend thru bolting them to the pallet/skid to avoid tipping later on.

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    I'm with Matt.

    On an appliance dolly, maybe, but I still wouldn't. On a standard hand truck, no way.

    I recently bought a Diacro #2 punch at auction, which I'm pretty sure weighs about the same, and has the same weight distribution as what you're looking at. Saw 340 pounds on the spec sheet, thought it wouldn't be a problem. Apparently that number is without the stand - about 400 with.

    About killed myself trying to use a handtruck. Ended up 'borrowing' a pallet jack somebody left unattended to get it out of the building, and then bribed the onsite rigger with a $20 to get it on my trailer.

    Problem isn't the 400 ish pounds on a handtruck, the problem is that 350 of that is at the very top. It does not lend itself to hand truck transport.

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    Before I had a forklift, I would move things like that with a comealong- 10 bucks at garage sales- I have a whole rack of em.
    And a pair of 4 wheel dollys. I cut a piece of 3/4" plywood 18" x 24", bolt 4 swivel casters on, each with a minimum of 200lb capacity.
    2 dollys means a theoretical 1600lb capacity. I wouldnt move 1600lbs that way, but for a kick press, its fine.

    I have been known to drill holes in the ceiling where there are joists, screw in a 5/8" diameter screw eye, and lower the load to the dollys with a comealong, or even two comealongs.
    Its cheap, slow, and prety safe.

    All the tools- the dollys, the comealongs, and maybe a couple big crowbars and some 2x4 scraps- are things you want in your shop anyway.

    Or- hire some help.
    I once drove to a Home Depot parking lot, and promised 20 bucks each to 8 guys who were hanging around hoping for day labor jobs, and, in a half hour, we moved about 10,000lbs of concrete slabs across a yard. I took em all back within an hour, everybody was happy, nobody was injured, and the job was done.

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    Not familiar with those presses, but drill presses like the powermatic 1200 weigh around 600-700 lbs. You can move them by rocking and walking them, a bit at a time. Don't get greedy. Sometimes doing it yourself is easier than trying to sync with a buddy. If you had a buddy you could ratchet strap a 2x4 to the press parallel to the ground and it might be a bit easier.

    You can tip a DP into a truck bed by ratchet strapping a couple of 2x4's vertical, with suitable padding, and then using them as levers to tip and slide the DP. You might be able to do something similar to tip the press on to one or two furniture dollies.

    Above all, be sure and maintain safe social distancing during this move!

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    Quote Originally Posted by matt_isserstedt View Post
    Any overhead hoist points in the shop? I looked and couldn't find a #12 easily, are these 200lb presses or 550 lb presses?

    On the low end a refrigerator truck could be used with some care. On the high end I wouldn't attempt it.

    If you could lift them straight up with a hoist point then lower onto a pallet base your day might get easier. Recommend thru bolting them to the pallet/skid to avoid tipping later on.
    Famco #12 is the heaviest of the three, height 61", 400lbs including stand, if factory crated. Think I will remove the foot lever (single pivot pin??), roll them out to my truck on a dolly, unbolt the press from the base and lift in in.
    Wouldn't want to try this with a handtruck.

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    Greetings,

    I've got (for the moment) 6 of them, and have moved them a bunch of times. They're not that heavy, on the scale of things, but the big thing to watch out for is that they're top-heavy as hell.
    I've got one on a shop-fox machine base for rolling around, and that works fine.
    I've single-handed moving the biggest of them once or twice. Easiest way to do it was to take the leg out. (one pin, in the head) and then if you're really desperate, take the head off the table. (two bolts) If you run a sling through the throat of the head, two guys can use a 2x4 over the top of the head to pick it up and walk away with it, Egyptian style.

    Hope this helps,
    Brian


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