Moving Lathe OUT of basement - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by wheels17 View Post
    Please do something to keep the truck from rolling. If you are just in park,you are counting on the pawl to hold the load. Even with the parking brake on I would be concerned. Make sure you block the wheels securely before you start to pull.
    The load on the truck is sideways. Also thats why I put an eye bolt on the other side - so I can anchor it need be. Point well taken a4bb7e1d-18c1-4386-8576-079362aea0ca.jpg
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 914b5bd1-7f0e-401a-9018-edfaa22db259.jpg  

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by HemiRambler View Post
    Perhaps I AM trainable! Test PIC Attachment 283031
    Adding video is just as easy, click the icon next to the picture, it is a couple frames of movie film.

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  5. #23
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    Not really any help but back in the late 70s I pulled a Harrison L5 out of the basement of a house in Vancouver.
    The only way to get the lathe out was to come up a steep and narrow set of stairs that led into the back yard. At
    the back of the property there was a big garage that spanned the full width of the yard except for a very narrow
    walkway down one side of the garage that made a turn in the middle. Even after we got the lathe out of the base-
    ment it would still have been a major pain to get it out to the alley.

    We solved the problem by hiring a big-ass mobile crane. (Any of you older Vancouverites remember Ralston
    Crane--they moved a lot of machinery back in those days.) We parked the crane in the alley and by reaching up
    over the garage and positioning the boom at the right height we were able to get a straight shot down to the
    basement and attach a cable to the lathe which we then dragged up the stairs. We had to rent a 30 or 40 ton
    crane to get enough reach but once the lathe was safely on level ground in the yard it was an easy job to use it
    to pick the lathe up, swing it over the garage and into the back of my pickup...

  6. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by matt_isserstedt View Post
    ...
    The first part of the job is a little hairy getting the weight up off the flat and up onto the inclined plane.
    Pulling lowish on the lathe, pref the skid, a skid that's even at the front, bearing on something flat and relatively slippery, steel, alum., plastic, etc should do it. It's also one more stress test in a progressive series of tests of the rigging.

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  8. #25
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    I welded up a bolt on extension to my pintle mount. It’s about 20” long and has a sleeve which the winch drops into(which is then pinned) there is s 1/2” eye bolt that I planned on for the safety.
    It is Hard to visualize that, A part 20" long straight out from the weld, or such that would try to bend the weld/the part?

  9. #26
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    I bought a lathe out of a basement that had to come back up stairs. I was going to man handle it and brought a bunch of labor/equipment to do it. I showed up and there was a back hoe backed up to the door of the house with the back hoe literally in the door and down the sairs. Turns out there was a neighbor that had a back hoe with an extendabucket that made it worth it. I paid him well.

  10. #27
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    Thats a lot of trouble for a comparatively lightweight lathe which looks like it would easily come apart into the major pieces. I'd say take tailstock, carriage, headstock off & carry them out by handtruck. Take the bed off the bases, carry bases out the same way. Make a skid out of a few 2x4's and slide the bed up the stairs, using plywood where appropriate to help out- a comealong would be fine there.

    I had my 14" American in and out of my basement, via stairs- probably weighs twice what the Clausing does and used the method above except I employed a shop crane to take the parts off.

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    That's a tiny lathe. Tear it down. There are floor joists above you to hoist from if you cant lift anything. Use a furniture dolly for the parts. BTDT.

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    I'm with taking it apart. Just make sure if you take the headstock off that you really clean the mating surfaces well before putting it back on.

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    Have 2 pieces of unistrut "track" with the opening upright on the stairs. lift the lathe and bolt on pieces of unistrut to widen the base. To the base unistrut attach some modified hinges. Modify one end of the hinge so it will fall into the slots in the unistrut. This will keep the lathe from sliding down the unistrut should your winch fail. It will also keep the lathe from going sideways. With a little creativity you can mount wheels or casters on unistrut that sits over the "base" unistrut. When you want the casters in play, tighten the bolts and lift the "base" unistrut off the ground by whatever fraction of an inch you want.

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    Quote Originally Posted by HemiRambler View Post
    The load on the truck is sideways. Also thats why I put an eye bolt on the other side - so I can anchor it need be. Point well taken a4bb7e1d-18c1-4386-8576-079362aea0ca.jpg
    Hey, I think your winch has the same motor as my kitchen blender. If you decide to mix up a big batch of margaritas when you're done, watch out - the motor will quit when it gets hot. Very frustrating when not everyone gets their drink at the same time.

    Looking at pics of the 5914, the support columns look very narrow. If you could remove those the lathe CG would be so much lower and more stable. Maybe you can find some info on what it takes to do that, and whether it would improve your time/safety/effort.




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    GO FOR IT. I have moved Lathes out of basements in similar situations. From your description of your plans I would say that you are well prepared and it should be a straight forward job. A couple comments that you probably have thought of. The 4 x 4 skids under the lathe need to have the leading edge tapered to add the transition onto the stairs.Ideally cut a nice curve like the front of a sleigh runner Also when the lathe is as close to the bottom of the stairs as possible. I would jack the front end up at least 4" inches and put a roller under the skids just a little ways back from the front end. This will also aid the transition from flat to stairs. If you are worried by the side load on the hitch and there is a suitable spot I would drive a stake into the ground angled away from the hitch and tie the hitch to the stake with a stout ratcheting strap. If the stake is 1" or more in diameter and driven into the ground 3 to 4 feet you will have plenty to resist the side load on the Hitch. Of course remove the chuck tailstock to lighten up the machine but if the motor is in the cabinet below the headstock I would not bother removing it . Also It would not hurt to remove the handwheels as they can be surprisingly fragile when bumped. At the top of the stairs it would be good to have a bent piece of sheet metal over the leading edge of the top stair to protect it from the cable. I am of the opinion that if your winch truly has a 2000lb capacity you will be fine with it . When you transition from the last step to the top landing go slow and it will very gently tip down to flat and there should not be any impact at all

  17. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glug View Post
    Hey, I think your winch has the same motor as my kitchen blender. If you decide to mix up a big batch of margaritas when you're done, watch out - the motor will quit when it gets hot. Very frustrating when not everyone gets their drink at the same time.

    Looking at pics of the 5914, the support columns look very narrow. If you could remove those the lathe CG would be so much lower and more stable. Maybe you can find some info on what it takes to do that, and whether it would improve your time/safety/effort.
    YEP, that's my big concern right now. It's a VERY small winch. On "paper" I calculated it should take 800-900# of force to move it up the ramp. The winch is RATED at 2,000#. The problems there are obvious - paper VS. reality don't always agree!! For instance I just learned that most winches are rated with ONE wrap on the drum and that you LOOSE ~13% per additional wrap (makes sense as you loose leverage). I'm working on borrowing a bigger winch as I really can't justify buying a bigger one when my blender winch :-) works for what I actually use it for (my dragster). I appreciate your point about heating up the motor - I've NEVER really "pushed" this winch so I have no idea how it will behave.

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    Quote Originally Posted by HemiRambler View Post
    YEP, that's my big concern right now. It's a VERY small winch. On "paper" I calculated it should take 800-900# of force to move it up the ramp. The winch is RATED at 2,000#. The problems there are obvious - paper VS. reality don't always agree!! For instance I just learned that most winches are rated with ONE wrap on the drum and that you LOOSE ~13% per additional wrap (makes sense as you loose leverage). I'm working on borrowing a bigger winch as I really can't justify buying a bigger one when my blender winch :-) works for what I actually use it for (my dragster). I appreciate your point about heating up the motor - I've NEVER really "pushed" this winch so I have no idea how it will behave.
    reason for the safety chain ..anything craps out and the machine just sets there and waits for whatever.

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  20. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frederick Harvie View Post
    GO FOR IT. I have moved Lathes out of basements in similar situations. From your description of your plans I would say that you are well prepared and it should be a straight forward job. A couple comments that you probably have thought of. The 4 x 4 skids under the lathe need to have the leading edge tapered to add the transition onto the stairs.Ideally cut a nice curve like the front of a sleigh runner
    Yes, I had planned on chamfering the front of the 4x4's but it'd be easy enough to take your advice and give it a little better shape.



    Quote Originally Posted by Frederick Harvie View Post
    Also when the lathe is as close to the bottom of the stairs as possible. I would jack the front end up at least 4" inches and put a roller under the skids just a little ways back from the front end. This will also aid the transition from flat to stairs
    Do you mean a loose roller as in a piece of pipe or a fixed one?


    Quote Originally Posted by Frederick Harvie View Post
    If you are worried by the side load on the hitch and there is a suitable spot I would drive a stake into the ground angled away from the hitch and tie the hitch to the stake with a stout ratcheting strap. If the stake is 1" or more in diameter and driven into the ground 3 to 4 feet you will have plenty to resist the side load on the Hitch.
    Yes I have added a eye bolt to my extension and I also saved an axle from a 9" ford rear axle - it's about 3ft long.

    Quote Originally Posted by Frederick Harvie View Post
    Of course remove the chuck tailstock to lighten up the machine but if the motor is in the cabinet below the headstock I would not bother removing it . Also It would not hurt to remove the handwheels as they can be surprisingly fragile when bumped.
    Yes I had thought about maybe removing the handwheels - I will definitely do it now. Cheap insurance.

    Quote Originally Posted by Frederick Harvie View Post
    At the top of the stairs it would be good to have a bent piece of sheet metal over the leading edge of the top stair to protect it from the cable.
    Yes, that is the plan. I also figured tieing in my "deck" to the stair pieces woudl be a real good idea.

    Quote Originally Posted by Frederick Harvie View Post
    I am of the opinion that if your winch truly has a 2000lb capacity you will be fine with it . When you transition from the last step to the top landing go slow and it will very gently tip down to flat and there should not be any impact at all
    My 2 biggest concerns are my winch - I really don;t know if it is close ot it's rating or not. I;ve only ever used it to pull my driagster up my tilt bed trailer - it's only 1600# and teh tilt isn't much. That tip point makes me nervous!!!! lotsa localized loading right there.

  21. #36
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    The correct way is it take the lathe apart. When you reassemble you will learn a lot and have a very true lathe.

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  23. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by HemiRambler View Post

    Do you mean a loose roller as in a piece of pipe or a fixed one?
    Yes a piece of pipe is ideal. You just need to get the front end in the air some to start the transition. remember to take it out after the front end is well on the upslope of the stairs otherwise the rear will go over the roller and then drop onto the stairs

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    Obviously, the problem with taking it apart is that you have to put it back together. Sure, you can do it, but why bother if you don't have to. And you don't have to.

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    That lathe will come apart in an hour or 2, a bit more to take the carriage off. 2 guys to pick the headstock off, use the joists or a crane or 4 guys to pick the bed off the 2 bases. Everything but the bed out to the pickup by handtruck- say 5 trips? Then spend a little bit of time playing nice with a comealong sliding the bed up and out (and onto the handtruck now down horizontal to roll the bed out), run that up a ramp made of a pair of 2x8's into the back of the pickup (using the comealong again). No need to spend a day playing games rigging a half ton lathe, but whatever floats your boat...

    Gotta clean the thing anyway- with it all apart, thats the time.

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    I would be concerned about the stair collapsing,or treads breaking.Sliding down is very different from skulldragging up a 45deg slope ......Would be a safer bet than the stockmarket ,I reckon......Strip the machine,even then ,the bed will be a big enough weight......I used to do all this kind of stuff,and I knew a dozen guys to call on with similar experience.....now at 70 ,just a memory...."A man needs to know his limitations"..Dirty Harry?


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