Moving Lathe OUT of basement - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by LKeithR View Post
    Not really any help but back in the late 70s I pulled a Harrison L5 out of the basement of a house in Vancouver.
    The only way to get the lathe out was to come up a steep and narrow set of stairs that led into the back yard. At
    the back of the property there was a big garage that spanned the full width of the yard except for a very narrow
    walkway down one side of the garage that made a turn in the middle. Even after we got the lathe out of the base-
    ment it would still have been a major pain to get it out to the alley.

    We solved the problem by hiring a big-ass mobile crane. (Any of you older Vancouverites remember Ralston
    Crane--they moved a lot of machinery back in those days.) We parked the crane in the alley and by reaching up
    over the garage and positioning the boom at the right height we were able to get a straight shot down to the
    basement and attach a cable to the lathe which we then dragged up the stairs. We had to rent a 30 or 40 ton
    crane to get enough reach but once the lathe was safely on level ground in the yard it was an easy job to use it
    to pick the lathe up, swing it over the garage and into the back of my pickup...
    Too bad there's no video of that! ... Or is there?

  2. #42
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    Off the truck. Removed the headstock to get the c.o.g lower.





    And down we go- a few years later it came back up the same way. The legs were not coming off without serious persuasion, so left 'em on. The entire Clausing in question weighs about as much as just the bed of this 14" ATW. Take the lathe apart as much as you can. Suggest not using pressure treated lumber for whatever you build, it has a lot of stiction under pressure. Moved a Bridgeport and Nichols horizontal the same way, using the same stuff.


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  4. #43
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    So I guess I'm the only one who noticed the S.H.I.T.? Super High Intensity Timing?

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    Knew a guy once ran a machinery business from a yard only accessable by a long steep flight of stone steps down the side of an old house and the property boundary.They used to run a trolley up and down with tons of stuff on it at times ,at the bottom was a overhead frame and monkey with a 5 ton chainhoist.Thousands of tons of engines ,gearboxes ,army surplus ,boat parts,etc ,went up and down there ....with only a few accidents...Old house is still there ,heritage listed ,back yard is now highrise flats.

  7. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by eKretz View Post
    So I guess I'm the only one who noticed the S.H.I.T.? Super High Intensity Timing?
    Brought to you by Atomic Spark Systems! I just can't help myself (plus I'm easily amused it seems):-)

    Jacin in Ohio

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  9. #46
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    Thanks for all the replies thus far. Can anyone tell me teh Pros and Cons versus Headstock first UP or Tailstock first UP? My last thought was Headstock up so the "TILT" at the top of the stairs would be minimized.

    Are there other schools of thought on this? I'd love to hear them. BTW I am planning on 2x6's on the stairs with 2x2 or 2x4 edge runners - so "steering" the load will hopefully be not needed much.

    Thanks in advance.

    Jacin in Ohio

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    I would say head first up for that same reason.

    You don't want anyone under it trying to lift the head stock.. Tail end should not be very heavy ..safety line should hold it from going back..to kill someone..

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  12. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    I would say head first up for that same reason.

    You don't want anyone under it trying to lift the head stock.. Tail end should not be very heavy ..safety line should hold it from going back..to kill someone..
    I agree. I have a little 2k rated winch but still plan on using a pulley on the lathe so it’ll only see 1/2 as much ((the winch that is). I machined a chain notch in my winch Mount also so I could use it as a safety anchor point. The chain will go thru the 3/4” eye bolt and then can get pinned as I take the slop out on the chain slot (never being without the safety chain hooked up in one spot or the other) then the small 1/2” eyebolt adding a separate anchor point to the whole schaboodle. I think I’ve more than over killed it here - which of course is my goal. Yes, I agree absolutely NO ONE beneath it during the slide up.

    d708737b-fe62-4ffc-b53b-551a59bed11c.jpg

  13. #49
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    I would bring the head stock up first as it will put the center of balance for coming over the top step closer to the front . Another very important consideration is where to fasten the pull cable to the lathe. If the pull cable is running against the floor on the upper landing and it is fastened to the leading end of the lathe when the lathe gets to the top of the stairs the cable will then pull Horizontal but you will need the lathe to still travel up hill on the incline until you have reached the balance point. If your winch anchor is above the level of the landing floor you will not have as much of an issue but unless the pull is parallel to the slope of the steps you will have some issues getting the lathe the last couple feet to the overbalance point. The solution is to put a cross bar on your skids that the lathe is mounted to about one third from the head stock end and run the cable between the skids and to the cross bar . This way the cable pull will be parallel to the slope of the stairs until one third of the lathe is above the landing and by this point you should have reached the balance over point so that the lathe is sitting level on the landing

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frederick Harvie View Post
    I would bring the head stock up first as it will put the center of balance for coming over the top step closer to the front . Another very important consideration is where to fasten the pull cable to the lathe. If the pull cable is running against the floor on the upper landing and it is fastened to the leading end of the lathe when the lathe gets to the top of the stairs the cable will then pull Horizontal but you will need the lathe to still travel up hill on the incline until you have reached the balance point. If your winch anchor is above the level of the landing floor you will not have as much of an issue but unless the pull is parallel to the slope of the steps you will have some issues getting the lathe the last couple feet to the overbalance point. The solution is to put a cross bar on your skids that the lathe is mounted to about one third from the head stock end and run the cable between the skids and to the cross bar . This way the cable pull will be parallel to the slope of the stairs until one third of the lathe is above the landing and by this point you should have reached the balance over point so that the lathe is sitting level on the landing
    Mr. Harvie, Thank You for your comments. I was concerned with exactly that point. Your suggestion addresses it quite nicely! The attached sketch shows where the pull points would be.(Not sure how my pic got rotated) I like improving it via your suggestion.
    Jacin in Ohio
    37231979-a10a-452c-9437-cb69491b5813.jpg

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    Another thing is that at the tipping to horizontal all the weight will be centered at that one place so the under the stair case need be strong there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    Another thing is that at the tipping to horizontal all the weight will be centered at that one place so the under the stair case need be strong there.
    Yes, I have looked and verified that I do have access for additional bracing.
    Today I rooted around and found some 2X4X1/8wall - looks like the perfect anchor crossmember. I welded some "L" tabs for a double shear pin - should be WAY overkill. I'm liking it.

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    Someday this war's gonna end.





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    So what happened?

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    Hopefully everything went well without any drama. I know I’m late to the party but for anyone that might read this thread for guidance I’ll add my two cents worth. I would have taken it apart and moved the sections up the stairs with my Powermate Stair climbing dolly without any additional help. I’ve removed plenty of awkward equipment, boilers, water heaters up to 75 gallon, etc. with this dolly. Best thing I ever purchased. The one I have is the smaller one rated for 600lbs. Last week I moved a whole wood shop out of a basement that was given to me because no one wanted to move the stuff or pay movers to do so. The 3hp shaper and 15” planer were the heaviest pieces at around 400lbs each. 18” bandsaw was the most awkward piece. Breaking down a Clausing like the one in this post would have been an easy move. I keep wanting to make a video or take pics but it never happens. If the local rental outfits have a stair climber I’d highly recommend it.
    Regards Z

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    Well to update. My buddy passed unexpectedly so I put the move on hold as I felt his widow doesn't need the commotion at the time. She recently called to tell me - that I should feel free to move it. SO I am just now gettign back to it. To Be Continued...

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    In the meantime ,Ive seen a great little machine for moving loads up steps ....rubber caterpillar treads and a hydraulic levelling platform ,so the load stays level,as the inclination of the treads changes to accomodate steps ,sills ,and variable slopes.Should have got a pic of it working ,but I was on another job on the site ,and couldnt hang around.....The crowd with it also had one of the little tracked indoor spider cranes ,incredible reach and lift with the outriggers our .(hence the spider tag)

  24. #58
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    I may have missed it, but where in Ohio?

    (Not sure if I'm asking to lend moral or physical support, or to make sure I'm outta town that day...)

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  26. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chip Chester View Post
    I may have missed it, but where in Ohio?

    (Not sure if I'm asking to lend moral or physical support, or to make sure I'm outta town that day...)
    About as nearly NORTH as you can get (slightly east of Cleveland) . Well TODAY was the day! To cap it off the things that I feel made the difference:
    1. We put a POST jack under the landing as close to the "tip point" as possible. Used a 4x4 spanning 3 floor joist.
    2. We threw together a 2x6 Track to distribute the load with 2x4 raised edges to guide it - THAT really helped.
    3. The 2X6 had several "cleats" holding it in position locking it from sliding UP or DOWN.
    4. We used MASONITE (hardboard) on the tile floor so that our wheels didn't damage the floor tiles.
    5. We used a pulley so my little 2k winch had a fighting chance - it worked perfectly.
    6. We "anchored" teh winch to an extended hitch mount on teh back of my 2500 Dodge AND
    7. We drove a 9" ford axle nearly 3 ft into the ground providing a second anchor point - the truck never budged.
    8. The wheel brackets made moving the lathe nearly effortless even on driveway concrete with the grooves.

    We started at 10 in the morning and was backing the trailer in my driveway around 3 or 4. Plus we stopped for pizza in between. Pics to follow. BTW I THANK everyone for their words of wisdom. Every little bit helped.

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  28. #60
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    I wish we had loaded my lathe into the pickup truck with the tailstock to the rear. They had a bigger crane to load. I used a cheap engine hoist and I had to get the boom over the headstock to reach the cg. there was not enough room under the boom and I cracked the plastic cover over the gears. I should have picked from the side and shifted it back farther several times. Later I bought an OTC crane with a factory bend in the boom which should solve that problem.
    Bil lD


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