Moving a lathe in a pickup truck - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Harrison M300 13x40 lathe weight 1775 pounds. in a ford f150. I bought piece of 3/4 plywood. Cut a 2x12 so I had two pieces that fit nicely side to side under the lathe pedestals. Four heavy straps to the bolted to factory inside tiedown points. Never even felt the weight going over the grapevine. About 400 miles one way. Unloaded with an engine crane. I should have loaded it headstock in.
    They seller loaded it headstock out. I used an engine crane to pick it from the factory eyebolt hole just in front of the headstock. Because modern pickup trucks are much taller I had clearance issues under the crane arm. I ended up breaking out some of the plastic gear cover.
    I should have removed the rear wheels and pushed the unloaded truck a few feet forward on its rear drums.
    Bil lD
    I returned the plywood to Hoe Depot the next day with no screw holes.

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  3. #22
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  4. #23
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    The abuse pickups can take is amazing. Farmer friend had a pick up with a flat bed on the back. Drove an old tractor up a pile of dirt onto the bed, but the truck wouldn't go. Turns out the bed was down on the tires, locking th he truck in place.

    His solution was to unload, wedge a couple of oak blocks between the axle and frame, load up, and go.

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  6. #24
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    I moved a 3500lbs lathe on a trailer rated for 7000lbs and was nervous.
    In a pickup? I'm not that brave/lucky/stupid. Plus....I have something to lose. A house, money, cars, etc. If I lost a lathe and killed a few people on the highway, I guess it wouldn't bother me if I had nothing they could come after. Or would it....??

    Pickups have essentially no tie-down capability. You can put all the bad-ass straps you like...it won't help when they're tied to 22ga. steel.

    Grown-ups don't half-ass jobs like this, especially when it can cause big problems for others.

  7. #25
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    I wouldn’t. A drop deck trailer is about $100 a day, and 100x safer and easier.

    Assuming you have a forklift on each end? Otherwise no way.

  8. #26
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    went and looked at a short bed heavy 10 SB a whiel back and when i said i wanted to cut the belt so i could set the lathe and legs apart in the bed of my truck. he looked at me like it will be fine told him i was going to rebuild if i won it anyhow so havign the mass lower wouldbe much safer. ended up passing on it but a 30 inch heavy 10 woudl have been in load of my dakota but no way in hell i woudl have it in the bed on the stand

  9. #27
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    The picture of the trailer....
    Single axle, likely a 3500# axle. So with the weight of the axle it is overloaded.
    As mentioned, the straps not only don’t prevent tip over, they are not oriented to prevent the load from sliding forwards or backwards.

    3500# in the back of a pickup.... Don’t know how you could safely restrain that load unless you tie into the bed bolts that tie to the frame. Small crash and that lathe would slice through the cab and squash you. Once saw a young man squashed when a 16 gallon beer keg came through the rear window of his pickup. Multiply that 16 gallon keg by 22 times and you don’t have a chance during a collision.
    Final rant. Would’nt lag screw to any timbers. They’ll pull out. Would thoughbolt.

    Yes I’m a nervous Nancy, but I grew up in ranch country and saw a fair # of folks get f’ed up by short cuts.

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  11. #28
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    Trailer Equipment Double Axle Special for Rent - United Rentals

    cost me $50 to rent last time I did it. Easily pushed the lathe by hand right onto the deck (on 1 inch pipes).
    Gotta ask yourself: "what am I saving by loading it into the pickup bed?"
    Answer: Nothing.

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  13. #29
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    As always, thanks very much for the valuable input. I guess I was just thinking about the overall weight and not really much about the tie downs. I think from what I have heard from some of you that yes, it could be done. I'm not nearly as cavalier about such things however as I have gotten older. I think I will rent a trailer. Again, thanks very much for all of you who helped me make a decision. It's about a four hour round trip to the Norfolk shipyard area and back and that's a lot of time for pucker pondering.

  14. #30
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    Ive carried lots of machines in a little Jap pickup ,rated at 1.35 ton max load.....My work pickup at the sandblasters was a Ford/Mazda Courier,1.35 rated,and I regularly carried 2 ton bulker bags of garnet on it.....low down ,for sure,and the fuel tank would get a bit of a scrape when I went over the bund wall at the tank farm.....but the little truck just kept going.......Note,all these pickups had the 8x6 alloy tray ,locally made of Alcoa planks,same as alloy brick truck bodies.My current Courier has an alloy tray body bought new in 1975.

  15. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by wheels17 View Post
    The abuse pickups can take is amazing. Farmer friend had a pick up with a flat bed on the back. Drove an old tractor up a pile of dirt onto the bed, but the truck wouldn't go. Turns out the bed was down on the tires, locking th he truck in place.

    His solution was to unload, wedge a couple of oak blocks between the axle and frame, load up, and go.
    Sounds fine. When I was a kid we had an old wrecker with a winch, F700 I think, with a 292 V8. It had huge springs with overloads, but it didn't matter. Once the springs came down maybe 1.5" the hard stop on the axle hit the frame and she was rock solid in the rear. At that point you were limited only by your courage and the obsolete tires.

    We did all kinds of sketchy things with that truck. Never had an issue.

    I once hauled an 1800 lb surface grinder and a 2000 lb automatic band saw at the same time in the back of an F-250. Went all the way from IL to central Texas. No issues at all.

  16. #32
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    Get the trailer, it is peace of mind.

    On that note, long ago I hauled my South Bend heavy ten with the cast base in the back of my 65 El Camino several times.

    Steve

  17. #33
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    I've carried 3K in my F-250 with no issues, Greenerd #8 press and a Oliver 55 wood lathe, but make sure your tires are up for it.
    I run my tires at about 60 psi with no or light loads. I air them up closer to 80 psi when heavily loaded.

  18. #34
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    Rent a kneeling trailer from sunbelt or united for $150/weekend, way less drama. You can easily load and unload it with a pinch bar, pipe, and a comealong.

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  20. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Rogers View Post
    Especially if the truck bed is the highly respected “ military grade aluminum “!
    Joe
    Yes I find that pretty funny also.

  21. #36
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    I've hauled a lot in pickup beds. Never really had an issue. Hauled a 5500 lb Kalamazoo auto saw, Verson mechanical press brake (not sure what it weighs?). Probably the heaviest was a 93 Dodge gas 2wd a helper loaded my entire rem steel pile into when I was moving my shop. I had a 3500 lb trailer with a 10K lb forklift already hooked to the truck too. I think there was 10K lbs in the bed of that truck. It was solidly down on the axle and the tires were squished flat at 110 PSI. I kept it under 80 on that trip.

  22. #37
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    Not military grade aluminium,but truck body grade....The alcoa planks just plain last ,and are light ....on a 20 ft /12 ton brick tray a saving of 1 ton over a steel tray means more bricks every trip......these bodies last 30 years carting packaged bricks ,with the rough brick directly in contact with the ally...Downside is price,of course........Howver ,out here ,there was a tax break if the little jap pickups could carry 1 ton,and a steel tray put them over,so ally trays caught on...and they are magic too,unfortunately lately cheaper ones have been showing up imported from China ,and made of sheet ,not planks.

  23. #38
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    [QUOTE=Rob F.;3459770]I just moved a Nebel 1308 which I read here is heavier than a 10EE on my F250 with no issues at all. Headstock to the cab.[/QUOTE


    I blew right rear tire hauling the Nebel 1308 currently in Halcohead inventory
    F250 --one ton springs

    exceedingly unpleasant tire change on Interstate 5

  24. #39
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    Two Schaublin 135 lathes plus hydraulic units in my truck bed from NJ to SC a few years ago..... weight over 6,000 lbs. Banded to pallets so not quite as dangerous as it looks... but not exactly safe either I admit... truck was stable, smooth...nice trip. No 4WD to keep CG relatively low for a dually.



    The road salt actually happened on the way from PA to NJ....before I loaded the lathes...

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  26. #40
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    In the past few years, the various state DOT's are getting quite "Nazi like" in roadside inspections, and violation fines.


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