Moving a lathe in a pickup truck - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    Milacron aint even smokin the wheel arches.....room for another ton ,easy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    In the past few years, the various state DOT's are getting quite "Nazi like" in roadside inspections, and violation fines.
    I've had State police stop and help me change tires on my trailer that was 10K lbs over weight.

    The bitch is when you blow a tire and you're so overweight that the 3 ton bottle jack won't lift the axle so you have to unhook and go buy another jack.

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    the trick is to tie it down good and tight
    so it can't start moving.

    works for the big yellow iron that weighs way more the the chains are rate for

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    image5857508.jpg

    Honest to God this was photographed locally by a friend. He had to stop and take a pic. This takes the cake for overloaded. No affiliation on my part. Just had to share this one.

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  6. #45
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    The thing I worry about, hauling things like this, is the bed floor holding up. Most modern pickups have a bed floor that is paper thin. I know my Chevy 2500 bed has plenty of dents in it, from hauling relatively small stuff. If I were to attempt to haul machine tools in a pickup, I think I'd at least lay a piece of 3/4 plywood on the bed floor, to help spread out the weight.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hodge View Post
    image5857508.jpg

    Honest to God this was photographed locally by a friend. He had to stop and take a pic. This takes the cake for overloaded. No affiliation on my part. Just had to share this one.
    Nice. Figure a tandem dump truck will weigh around 21,000 lbs empty. That trailer and pickup might be good for 8,000 lbs payload...

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    Looks like the ramp at back of the trailer is solidly on the roadway.....Anyhoo ,the pickup (Ford 450?) would be defected here for the tyres outside the guards ....the Fords are pretty solid ,but the trailer has single wheels .The truck seems to be a small Freightliner ,and 10 ton would be about right.....Surprising what you can carry if nothing breaks ,and before the tyres heat.....Friend moved his operation across the road after buying the property......he made a simple home built trailer and put up to 20 ton on it .....just across the road ,tho,and towed it with a 4x4 ,not a giant pickup like that.

  9. #48
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    No beds on F450, probably F350, could also be a F250, not sure if roof lights were an option on the 250, usually see them on 1 tons.
    Kind of looks like they drove the truck on the trailer to look at something and/or repair something. Dont see that rig moving at all with the back solidly on the ground.
    Last edited by Rob F.; 12-22-2019 at 08:07 AM. Reason: spelling

  10. #49
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    ".Anyhoo ,the pickup (Ford 450?) would be defected here for the tyres outside the guards"

    The cops used to crack down on this sort of thing years ago. There was a law, even, that stated something to the effect that no part of the vehicle could stick out more than 3" from the body on the driver's side and 6" on the passenger side.

    But I've noticed that law seems to have been rescinded. And now we have tons of dopes who lift their F-250 a couple feet and hang the tires a foot outside the body then drive around flinging rocks on everyone else's car. Or these guys:

    poke.jpg

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  12. #50
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    Ahh yes, the Ben Hur edition.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob F. View Post
    No beds on F450, probably F350, could also be a F250, not sure if roof lights were an option on the 250, usually see them on 1 tons.
    Kind of looks like they drove the truck on the trailer to look at something and/or repair something. Dont see that rig moving at all with the back solidly on the ground.
    For the sake of accuracy, F450's do come with beds. Fairly common.

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    Quote Originally Posted by woodsrider845 View Post
    For the sake of accuracy, F450's do come with beds. Fairly common.
    Good to know, when did they start that option, 2017? I dont keep up as much as I should I guess. Do they offer the F450 with SRW also, like in the picture?

  16. #53
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    Back around 1994 when I bought my first lathe from a store in San Jose, CA which shall remain nameless, I had the store personnel load the crate onto the bed of my then 1973 Chevrolet long-bed pickup. I had previously upgraded the rear axle to include 3/4 ton springs so it wasn't too bad, even though the crate weighed about 1,800 pounds. I was careful driving and we made it home, I would have been much better off with a properly-sized trailer, though.

    When I brought my 3,500 pound Webb mill home, however, I borrowed a trailer and Diesel truck to be on the safe side. That worked too.

  17. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by steve45 View Post
    Secure the upper parts of the lathe securely to each side of your trailer. Each strap should attach to the lathe separately. In the photos above, the top of the lathe is NOT secured. There is a strap going over it, but nothing to prevent the lathe from sliding under the strap and tipping over. I would use 4 straps and secure them to the spindle, headstock, tail stock, or bed individually. Be sure to angle the straps toward the front and rear to prevent fore/aft movement.

    Drive slow, take lightly traveled routes, watch for potholes!
    was gonna say the same thing- I saw them haul a new panel box in from the other plant one day, strapped over the top- as the guy turned in it rocked/slid under the strap destroyed a new control and damaged the truck... tying each side is the only way to go on topheavy stuff.

    Ive moved my old leblond 17x48 a total of 4 times over the last 30 years (just hit me how long ive had it!) in my D150 and F150, but I took the legs off- its the old style with the old treadle sewing machine-like removable legs- still cinched each side else it would slide. I moved my bridgeport twice, both times took it apart with a cherrypicker, laid the base on its side(just used a 10' 4x4 and tipped/rocked it down/back up by hand, believe it or not...top of the base casting is surprisingly light, hardest part was not letting it thunk upright- had a ratchet strap to lower it the past balance point to upright- laying on its side was easy...my back and shoulder will probably never allow that again though).

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    The way to secure such things is to cross the chain over itself under the item.....this is how you secure pipes on a rack on a truck.....the pipe cant roll ,because it is forced to rotate against the roll....Ive secured 1/2 ton hydraulic rams on a rack on a pickup safely like this.A tie over the top allows the item to roll under the tie quite easily,no matter how tight it is.

  19. #56
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    I have some 4"x4"x3/8"wall sq tubing about 6' that I bolt across most of the machines bases that I can.They fit the width of my trailer which I can then bolt down.With straps angled and and cross connected I'm confident that even if the trailer detached the machine and trailer would end up in one piece.

    Another benefit is that they are the first and last things that are connected to the machines and no way can the machines be tipped over loading or moving around.

    Always use wood between tubing and trailer.

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  21. #57
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    I just bought a used 8"x36"x48" surface plate. The plan was to take the stone off the stand, but the person I bought it from couldn't get the fork truck under the stone so it all got loaded in my Suburban on the stand. The truck is a 1999 k1500, but I put a 2500 axle in it and made 6+1 spring packs for it, and put 10 plys on so it handled it ok, But I learned a good lesson about strapping things properly when it when through my rear side window and was teetering. I was very lucky it didn't fall out, and I got it back on the stand with some ratchet straps, and called a tow truck to borrow more straps and had him follow us with his lights so I could take it real slow like. Next time it's a trailer.

    (the surface plate was not harmed)

    Surface plate $350
    Tip for loading $50
    Tow truck $50
    Window $300
    Tip for unloading $100 (my plan to unload required the stone on the floor)

    How much does a trailer rental cost?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 4b93cfe9-2f04-40ea-8271-3c00065a0e8a.jpg   e783555c-a861-4799-9182-5b89d71cf949.jpg   9d58039f-52cf-462c-b259-8cea028386bb.jpg  

  22. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by SexieWASD View Post
    ...

    Surface plate $350
    Tip for loading $50
    Tow truck $50
    Window $300
    Tip for unloading $100 ...
    Relief for not having damaged the surface plate: Priceless!

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  24. #59
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    Cincinnati #2 . 2400lbs. Drove it from Ohio to Milwaukee. Then had it sitting in the bed of my truck for 3 weeks, taking it with me to school every day. Secured it with four 3000lb ratchet straps, and blocked all sides of machine with 4"x4" lumber so that it would not move around.

    My 2500HD Silverado diesel is rated for around 3500lbs. But even with 2400lbs , the rear did not sag. So I am guessing my truck can carry much more than 3500lbs?



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