My gantry crane build - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    You ll have lots of friends when the gantry is finished......wanting to borrow it..............I loaned out my demountable ,the lift went OK,but as he was pulling it down,the A frame for one side fell against the door of his company car.

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    I could see making a crane for various projects but if the main reason is to lift a body on an F350....there are certainly better and easier and cheaper ways to do it. Keep in mind...these trucks have bodies lifted off all the time - it's not an unusual happening.

    A $2000 auto lift will do the trick and, if you choose, can be erected on a temporary basis. You don't even need a garage to house it in.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GregSY View Post
    I could see making a crane for various projects but if the main reason is to lift a body on an F350....there are certainly better and easier and cheaper ways to do it. Keep in mind...these trucks have bodies lifted off all the time - it's not an unusual happening.

    A $2000 auto lift will do the trick and, if you choose, can be erected on a temporary basis. You don't even need a garage to house it in.
    Oh sure, if I didn't make it clear, I agree that there are other ways of lifting the cab on the F350; it is indeed a common event and there are cheaper ways to go about it, no doubt. I considered a lot of alternatives, farm jacks, multiple modified engine hoists, etc. However, somehow all of those ideas felt like a Robinson Caruso approach to the task. I like the safety factor of using a gantry instead. And I would *LIKE* an auto lift, but have no place to install one, even on a temporary basis. Unless I want to do so on the bare ground, I meant dirt -> earth. So yeah ... a lift isn't in my immediate future.

    I'll use the gantry for other things I'm sure. TBD.

    john.k - well that would be cool if folk wanted to use it. Heck, rent it out cheaply, make some of the $$$ I've spent back. I shudder to think about what I've spent on it thus far. However I suspect that the renting-it-out thing won't happen. I look at the project overall as an interesting learning experience. It's given me reason to pick up a stinger again, and that's a good thing. I'd gotten far too lazy with the ol' trusty MIG gun...

    Anyway thanks,
    Jerry

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    Work on the gantry has been slow the past month or so, mostly due to the rather poor weather we've had in the central TEXAS area during that time. 'Seemed like each opportunity to work on the project would come, then go with no progress due to rain. I did manage to finish the verticals (done inside the workshop) and their gussets. I then moved them outside for assembly. In addition, I welded the vertical support plates to what-will-be the bottom of the main beam. That was a couple of weeks ago or so, IIRC. So the rain let up long enough today that I could resume work on the project.

    I decided that I would mount the verticals to the bottom of the main beam (inverted) for the dual purpose of welding the gussets to those verticals and determining the position of the gusset's support plate so that this plate could then be welded to the bottom of the main beam, just as the support plate for the verticals was welded as mentioned above. I couldn't get started until later in the afternoon, so I managed to only get one side done prior to darkness falling, what with the customary family-related interruptions. Well, technically I finished the welds of the gusset to the vertical, but only got the 6010 root pass done on the gusset's support plate, but I can run the 7018 stringers tomorrow after work, no problem.

    Pictures from today:
    gusset-1.jpg
    gusset-2.jpg

    I attempted to record a video regarding today's work but technical difficulties resulted in content that was more talking-heads than work-being-done, so I decided to scrub it.

    Since my last post I bought a Crown Victoria, the intent of which was to keep as a project. Turns out the wife likes the color and wants it as her daily. Sigh. So that lil' project bubbled up to the top. It has tranny issues and inconsistent compression. So I plan to pull the entire drivetrain; 'point being that this task will likely be the first actual work for the gantry. And since the wife would like to begin driving it soon, that means I need to finish the gantry soon. Thus I hope to have more updates in the near future. Providing that the wx cooperates.

    Anyway thanks,
    Jerry

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    Wow - that looks really nice so far!

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    Thank you Joe! Well the wx has definitely gotten the better of me the past couple of days. Yesterday I managed to touch-up a weld on the underside of the gusset and get it primed, however just as I had everything back in the workshop, down the wet stuff came. Tonight was a repeat, save I only finished 3 stringers before I heard the rumblings in the heavens and decided to shut it down for the night. Did not even have the door closed on the workshop before the waterworks came for another visit. And they're staying with us in Central TEXAS for the next 3 or 4 days if you can believe the forecast. So it appears like it'll be slow-going for the next little bit.

    At least I've found a couple of online sources for custom spray paint. Currently all of the components are still in primer. Ideally I'll paint it burnt orange in support of our local university (UT), who's colors are burnt orange and white. The Longhorns dontchaknow.

    Anyway enough jabbering.

    Thank y'all,

    Jerry

  7. #47
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    Although not completely dry, today brought the first view of the sun that we've had in several days. It was dry enough to resume work on the gantry, so I got to it. I didn't have all day as I would have preferred, since mother's day duties took precedence.

    I decided that today I would focus on the outer verticals. I further decided to deviate from my original plan just a bit. You see, the plan was to weld a 5"x10"x0.5" plate on top of each of the H-beam feet (where "feet" = the horizontal H-beam members to which the casters attach underneath), then weld the bottom of the verticals to those plates. However, doing so renders the join of the outer verticals and the feet as permanent. Mind you, there is nothing whatever wrong with that approach. However, I would prefer to build the gantry in as modular a fashion as I can while maintaining safety. For that reason I decided to continue with the weld of the aforementioned plate to the top of each foot, but to weld a separate plate of the same dimension (5"x10"x0.5") to the bottom of the outer verticals, drill 4 holes through each and install carriage bolts through those holes. This is the same prescription that I am following to mate the inner verticals to the main beam. And of course if I do this for the bottom of the outer verticals, then I'll need to follow suit for the outer vertical gussets. The plan was to weld those to the feet too, but they'll need to be plated, have holes drilled and secured with bolts as well. That said, in the end you'll have the ability to disassemble the gantry for easier storage. Granted the main beam and outer vertical gussets will be welded on the one end and will therefore make said storage a bit more challenging, but not considerably so.

    Here are a couple of pictures from today's adventures. First the plates on the feet:
    bottom-plate-1.jpg

    In this view I am in the process of welding the plates onto the outer verticals:
    outers-1.jpg

    A note regarding those feet (and feel free to correct me if I am using the incorrect term for this component). A short while back I posted an update in which I admitted that I had cut those feet to 6' in length, as opposed to the 5' that I had on my plan. I inquired as to whether or not anyone had any feedback regarding the need to trim that 1' off or if I could leave it as-is, with the thought of mounting the casters directly underneath the point at which the outer vertical gussets mount to the feet. Hearing nothing and after giving it some thought, I kinda concluded that it wasn't critical. The concern I had being that the extra length would yield a lower down force number (ergo weight) to achieve a given amount of deflection. However given the rather light use case scenarios that I have planned for the gantry it didn't seem to be a factor. Couple that with the fact that when I ran the numbers the deflection at 6' versus 5' was still acceptable, well that cemented the decision for me: I would keep the 6' length. I also liked the stability that the extra length would provide when moving the gantry around, especially outdoors on uneven surfaces.

    And having said all of that, I decided further that I'd design in a slightly different caster arrangement than originally planned too. I mean, the original idea that I had was to install a heavy-duty caster directly underneath the point at which the outer vertical gussets mounted to the feet. Thus there would be four (4) of them - and note that the original plan was for the feet to be 5', not 6'. However, since I am going with the longer length and since I will be using it exclusively outdoors on uneven terrain and since the loads will be relatively light WRT the capability of the components as a whole, I decided that with regard to the casters, I would use "more conventional" variants in comparison to those I purchased from that local wholesaler. That is, I'll go with either air-filled or solid rubber tire-based casters. Furthermore I'll mount 4 of them per side (since they're not the heavy duty steel type casters), with the outboard-most casters being at the very end of the 6' feet, and the inboard casters being located about halfway beteween the end and the midpoint of those feet. Finally, just in case this gantry is ever used indoors someday on a smooth concrete surface, I'll create plates that will be located directly underneath the aforementioned outer vertical gussets such that the heavy duty Superior Tire casters that I purchased locally can be swapped in and the air-filled/solid rubber casters removed. Ergo, the gantry will have two (2) configurations WRT caster arrangements: one for outdoors and uneven terrain (air-filled/solid rubber tire casters only) and one for indoor, smooth surfaced concrete (heavy duty Superior Tire casters only). Granted, there is a little tear-down-setup required to make that transition, but not too much and it is expected in a way, so that seems reasonable.

    Ok enough for tonight.

    Thank you,
    Jerry

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    Went to Fastenal this afternoon to pick up the hardware that I'll use to bolt everything together. The plan was to go with either 3/4 or 7/8 bolts with cotter pin holes to use with castle nuts. Figured that if anyone would have them Fastenal would. Yeah not so much. They don't carry that, as it turns out. I was told that they could "get anything" but it would come in quantities of 1000, not the 20 I need. Hmmmmmmmm....dunno. I was just a bit surprised by this turn of events. I mean if they don't have it and can't get it but in bulk quantities, where *can* a Joe-schmo like me get them? Dunno that either.

    So after some discussion I went with 3/4x10 3" grade 8 bolts, some washers and the steel "distorted" nuts instead of the nylon option. The last item will need to be single use but they're inexpensive, so not a problem. I got 20 of everything to begin with:
    hardware-1.jpg
    hardware-2.jpg

    When I returned home I decided to get started even though dark would soon be headed our way. 'Got the mag drill configured and in-position, then began drilling. What a time to discover that you ordered the incorrect set of drill bits!

    So I placed an order tonight and the correct set (that I thought I had in my cart but didn't) should arrive Thursday. So things are on-hold until then, as I'd like to finish the hole-drilling prior to welding any further. The welding of the main beam gusset prior to drilling is gonna make drilling those holes complicated enough, don't need to augment the situation further. We're not forecast to receive any rain between now and then (miracle!) so I just left the outer vertical that I was working on clamped in place for the time being:
    holes-1.jpg

    Anyway thanks,
    Jerry

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    Ok so the lengthier annular cutters arrived today and I put the 13/16 to work straight away:
    holes-2.jpg

    Because I'll need to repetitively assemble and disassemble various components during the last phases of construction and prior to the final (or should I say "first" - hah!) assembly, I went to a local big box store and purchased some plain ol' vanilla 3/4 nuts to use for that purpose. The "distorted steel" ones that I purchased at Fastenal are technically one-time-use only, so I opted to err on the side of caution:
    holes-3.jpg

    That's the first leg/foot done:
    holes-4.jpg

    Starting on the second/other leg/foot, fighting darkness to get it in, as per normal:
    holes-5.jpg

    It's starting to look like something!
    holes-6.jpg

    I've decided that the next step for me will be to finish the vertical-to-leg/foot gussets, then revisit the verticals-to-main-beam stuff. I will finish up by drilling the pin holes in the verticals and installing the mounting plates for the casters. At that point she should be ready to spring to life!

    Thanks,
    Jerry

    ps-Almost forgot about the angle that I'll weld to the inner verticals to account for the gap between 4" and 5" tubing. IIRC the angle is 3/16" but I can't recall off-hand. The math that I just ran through the gray matter upstairs works out with that size of angle, so that is likely what I bought. Anyway I decided to go with that over the flat bar that I originally ordered for this purpose. We'll see how the new idea works out...
    Last edited by av8or1; 05-16-2019 at 11:40 PM. Reason: grammar

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    Alright, back online after mending-the-fences WRT familial issues. Mom is getting up there and can't live on her own anymore, so I drove up to get her and bring her back to live with us. Shouldn't impact my project time too much, or so the hope goes. But you gotta do what you gotta do, so...

    Anyway, I had some time today so I revisited the gantry project. On the agenda was more hole drilling. Despite the interruptions I made good progress. That said, four more holes remain to be drilled on one of the main beam gussets, and I still need to drill all of the holes for the casters. Not to mention the pins, but that will come later.

    So here was the first drilling of the day: the opposite inner vertical, where it mounts to the bottom of the main beam:


    The opposite side already has the main beam gusset welded to the inner vertical, as seen in a previous post. Drilling the outer holes was simple:



    The inner holes, well that would be another story, as you might surmise. No way to fit the mag drill in that space. So I removed the inner vertical and drilled the holes through the support plate that is welded to the main beam, as well as through the main beam itself:


    I then re-mounted the inner vertical and inscribed the pattern of those holes onto the bottom of the support plates that are welded to the main beam gusset and inner vertical:


    Drilled those holes:



    And as per normal, darkness got the better of me.

    Hope to get some more work done tomorrow, we'll see.

    Thanks,
    Jerry

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    Well I managed to resume work on the gantry today. Grandma wasn't feeling all that well, so I didn't make as much progress as I planned. However, I did manage to weld the support plate onto the main beam for the second vertical's gusset. Then drilled the outer holes through the gusset's supporting plate, the plate I just welded and the main beam itself. Finally, I welded that gusset to said vertical and installed a couple of bolts to hold things in place while I shuffle components around. Summary of today's work in picture form:





    And naturally, darkness won again.

    At the next opportunity, I'd like to repeat the process of drilling the interior holes on this second vertical's main beam gusset, much like I did yesterday. This time however there will only be two holes to drill, which should make things easier. From there I'll likely dismount the outer verticals from their legs/feet, flip the legs/feet over and weld the plates for the casters. All plates that I use on this project remain 1/2" thick, FWIW.

    Regarding paint. The online offering of custom spray paint was quite pricey. Therefore today while I was in a big box store for unrelated reasons, I inquired regarding the possibility of mixing a custom paint color that could be used for metal surfaces. I was shown a paint that is used on metal doors and trim. It is also an interior/exterior based paint. Told that I could have whatever color, just needed to bring in a sample from which they could do a color match. I need to research this paint just a bit and see if it would hold up to the weather. 'Guess I could always clear it with regular spray-can clear coat...just thinking out loud.

    Anyway thanks,
    Jerry

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    Quote Originally Posted by av8or1 View Post
    Wow, I wasn't expecting all of that. Kinda surprised really, practical machinist didn't seem like that kinda place to me when I did my research here. 'Seemed more supportive and friendly, even to forum newcomers. Hmmmm...interesting.

    Oh well, 'tis what it is.

    Keep my posts short and don't include video links. I can do that.

    And just to give grief of my own back to those who have chided, I have no idea what was meant by the "look around" comment, save possibly that you think I should have been able to glean that folk here prefer short posts ... which wasn't obvious to me. I read a good number of posts in this forum and didn't draw that conclusion. As a member of I-don't-know-how-many forums and moderator/admin of some of them, this is the first I've heard of the keep-posts-short business. Interesting...

    And HELL NO there was NO SPAM in my post nor in my video. If you equate a long post to spam, you need to revisit the concept of spam. And don't start with me about that either, I'm not a machinist by profession, but a computer engineer. I was on "the Internet" long before there WAS an Internet (and Al Gore DID NOT INVENT IT) and so I know SPAM when I see it. And a long post it ain't.

    Eh whichever, no big thing. I'm done.
    Nothing wrong with a video, infact it can be very useful in showing/explaining subject matter. If videos were a faux-pas there wouldn't be a "insert video" in the feature ribbon for a post reply or post creation.

  14. #53
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    How are y'all? It's been a quasi-rough week on this end; Grandma seems to be doing a little better now, so I was able to get in a little work on the gantry this evening. I decided to focus on the gussets for the leg/feet. Originally the plan was to make these from the 5x5 SST. However I decided that I'd rather keep that around for future projects and use the 4x4 leftovers instead. Unfortunately I only had enough of that material remaining to make 2 of them. So this week I had the steel supplier cut a couple of 39" sticks. This SST is also 1/4" wall thickness. My son insisted that I cart the new tubing in his wagon when I took them off for cutting:


    Then went to work on them, grinding any surface rust off of the exterior and giving the inside the same treatment as the other SST in the project. The two 4x4 pieces that I already had needed the interior job done too, so I finished them off as well:


    Then it was time to cut stuff. The chop saw made short work of it; soon I had the gussets and their leg/feet support plates ready to go:


    I mocked up one set to get an idea of how it was gonna come together:


    And was reasonably pleased with the result. As per normal darkness came along to inform me that it was time to break off project-related work for the night and go help get the young-un ready for bed. So the welding would have to wait until tomorrow.

    Thanks,
    Jerry

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    Also, I made a video of the work from the previous post.

    Thanks,
    Jerry

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    Living on acreage as we do means that your yardwork duties increase noticeably from those required on a conventional suburban lot. So the past 2 or so days have included a fair amount of that stuff. 'Point being that it's slowed the work on the gantry a bit. However I managed to circle the wagons back to the project for a little while this evening.

    The first item of note is a small change to the legs/feet support. Originally, the plan was to utilize but a single support plate and that plate would be welded to the gussets. These plates would rest directly on top of the legs/feet (H-beam). I felt that this would be sufficient for this support function. However, I decided that for reasons of symmetry and consistency, I would install a support plate onto the legs/feet (H-beam), ergo I would weld a plate to the legs/feet and the gussets would continue to have their own support plate. This is the formula that I use for the inner and outer verticals as well as the main beam gussets. So why not?

    I didn't have enough 1/2"x5" material to make 4 extra 10" plates however, so I called the steel supplier who cut them to length. 'Picked them up after work:


    So I went about the process of clamping them to their leg/foot counterparts, then drilling the holes:


    That's all 8 drilled and the new plates put into primer:


    Now to begin the fit-up for welding:


    Unfortunately interruptions were commonplace tonight, so I only managed to get the leg/foot gussets tacked into place, along with a few root passes (6010):


    I decided to primer everything as a precautionary measure against the possibility of the wet stuff coming our way again prior to my next available opportunity to work on the project. That'll mean a little more grinding during the startup, but if it flash rusted, you'd need to do that regardless, so...

    Anyway thanks,
    Jerry

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    If you want it to assemble easy, you do it by grabbing the top beam by the web, with a single pivot point. Start out with your beam in the air a couple feet. Your uprights use a single pivot to the web in double shear. Now you put a winch or comealong on the bottom of the legs and just pull them together. Walla, it lifts itself up, then you put the bolts in to your gusset plates and torque everything down.

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    Hi av8or1:
    Not to divert this thread or anything but I just gotta ask:
    You describe yourself as a computer engineer but you obviously know your way around fabricating and welding too.
    Care to share your experience with the rest of us?

    I have encountered a few software engineers with practical experience in a trade but not that many, and even fewer who have professional level skills in a trade so unrelated to their day job .
    How did you go from the one to the other?
    What do you do for a living now?
    Where do you get the energy to work all day, run a home and family, and bust ass humping heavy shit around until nightfall?
    I'm impressed!

    Cheeers

    Marcus
    Implant Mechanix • Design & Innovation > HOME
    Vancouver Wire EDM -- Wire EDM Machining

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    snowman- Thank you for the feedback. Yeah, I've come across that approach during the research phase. Here's a rundown of the video examples of (mobile) gantry crane assembly/raising that I found during said research.
    Enjoy!

    First, this is one of the better examples I found, if not the best:


    There's another video that is similar to this, but the guy doing the assembly just lifted it manually to install the pivot bolt and cranked it from there. Can't find that video, or else I'd link it for completion.

    Then there are these fellas in Europe. This is one of the more well-rounded examples that I found; on par with the first one if not a little better:


    These fellas make short work of it in about 50 seconds (condensed naturally!):


    And these kids have a system that works for them, which I appreciated. Good stuff young men!


    These fellas had an interesting approach that involved using an electric wench on a truck:


    More in the next post...

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    Then there was this guy who assembled a Harbor Freight gantry:


    Spanco weighed in with their aluminum gantry assembly video:


    Some outfit named Air Technical had a similar approach to the Spanco variant:


    This fella employed what seemed like a Heath Robinson/use-whatever-you-can-find approach, which I could appreciate too (fast forward to 3:05 for the assembly stuff):


    And yet another company named Aardwolf sure made it look easy:


    More in the next post...

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    Even more aluminum gantry assembly stuff (ho-hum):


    These fellas used an overhead suspension approach, which I think is a good idea, if you have that available (fast forward to 2:45):


    Ok enough, you get the idea I think. In most all of the assembly documentation I've seen, the swing-the-vertical-into-place approach was done with an aluminum gantry crane; it was possible due to the crane's lower weight. The steel cranes by contrast were assembled in various other ways, so it'll be a kind of a take-your-pick selection for me, or possibly a roll-your-own method. We'll see. One forum member suggested renting a forklift to raise the beam into position, then slide the verticals underneath them, then bolt everything together. That has merit, but is not without its own set of problems.

    So in the end, how I'll approach the raising-of-the-beast remains TBD for the time being.

    Again, thank you for the feedback though, I appreciate the input.

    Jerry


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