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  1. #101
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    epoxy piece os screen over drain holes to keep dam wasp,s out

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    I didn't read every word, so I apologize if it's been said.
    Any concerns with the welds? considering this is a load carrying structure, some welds look lacking in penetration and pretty globbed on.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro

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    Deluge2-

    Thank you for the interest as well. Yeah I don't understand the brevity thing, but perhaps machinists are just known for short attention spans. I try to get along so I follow this general axiom even though it's the first forum in which I've experienced it. The spam thing ... I dunno, I think a few folk might have been throwing that out to give me a bit of grief; ergo I'm not sure they were serious about it. But whichever, I came out swinging anyway because I know what spam is, don't like it and don't like being accused of it even more so. But I digress ... whatever.

    I decided to do a telescoping gantry crane partly because I liked the challenge but mostly because - at the time I made the design choice - I was looking at a new property on which the outbuilding had 20' ceilings and a 10' door. So the plan was to stay well under that so that I could take it inside. Then I discovered a few unrelated things about that property and decided not to pursue it. However by that time the material had already been purchased, so I went ahead with it anyway. We're still on the hunt for a new property and the hope is that it'll have a similar outbuilding. TBD.

    Regarding the pins, yes I agree: why not use them when the crane is in use. So I will drill some additional holes and do just that. Mind you, for the majority of my use case scenarios the crane in the lowest position will suffice WRT height clearance. But there will be times when I need more, so ...

    Oh sure, water will get in, I've known that all along. Just trying to curb it somewhat. Holes at the bottom of the outer verticals were always in the game plan. Living in TEXAS, I don't worry about snow or ice. We see that once maybe every 8 years or so.

    cammer-

    Yes, a screen to keep pests out is on my to-do list.

    Thank you again!
    Jerry

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    Quote Originally Posted by ripperj View Post
    I didn't read every word, so I apologize if it's been said.
    Any concerns with the welds? considering this is a load carrying structure, some welds look lacking in penetration and pretty globbed on.
    As someone who worries about most everything, I do think about the welds sometimes, along with other things. A few of them were in hard-to-reach places, so I got a little undercut. I ended up chasing that to fill it in, thus the globby look in those places. Also, every join has at least one 6010 root and two 7018 stringers. Some more than that. This contributes to the globby look as well. Regarding penetration, well, all I can say is that based on the testing I did with the same material (WRT type and thickness) I was satisfied with the penetration I was seeing given the settings I had on the welder at the time. I used that same welder with those same settings throughout the welding portion of this build. So I'll just have to trust the testing I did. For the key joins, there was always a bevel, a land and a small gap. That was one group of settings on the welder. The remaining joins were lap joins and that was done using a different group of welder settings. I was consistent with those (programmed into the welder) and did the best I could to ensure adequate penetration. I tried to leave no undercut behind, no matter how small, and to grind down and re-do any porosity that I saw. There ended up being very little of the latter, which was good because I don't like having to grind out porosity and re-weld.

    Anyway that's that. Thank you for the feedback though, I appreciate it.
    Jerry

  6. #105
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    Had family stuff to do today, so I didn't have enough time to do any real work on the gantry. However I did manage to pull the ram jacks out of the corner of the garage where I had been storing them. And the "remove before flight" tags came in, so that was cool. I like to give an aviation theme to my projects where applicable/appropriate:


    The third ram jack is for my engine lift. The existing one is leaking and needs to be replaced. Thought I'd do that with a pneumatic variant like on the gantry. I'm sometimes impatient, so having that capability on the engine lift will be a good thing.

    I decided that since I had a little time, I'd take a closer look at the casters. First I got a weight and they're a bit on the hefty side at almost 24 pounds:


    As mentioned in a previous post I was curious to know how these worked. So I decided to take them apart to get a look-see inside. In the end, I discovered that they work just as I suspected: the tightness of the through bolts determines how readily the caster can articulate and the set screws determine the extent of that articulation. The through bolts are 10.9, which was good to see given their application context. However I did notice step wear on the bottom through bolt:


    And so they must go. I will see if the local Fastenal has some identical replacements, else order online. TBD. The set screws press against these through bolts and are thus responsible for the wear. The limitation of articulation is done via an interior solid rubber component as well as an interior wall, which forms a cavity around the top through bolt:


    And of course once you're happy with where the set screws are, you lock them in place via their surrounding nuts:


    I noticed a zerk fitting for the wheels and for the rotating base, so I snatched my grease gun off of the outbuilding wall and lubed them up:


    And with that I had to help the wife get our son into bed, so it was - unfortunately - time to call it a night.

    Thank y'all for reading,
    Jerry

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    So I decided to see if I could finish off at least one of the ram jack installations tonight. Yeah not quite. I encountered a small issue. It's not a big deal and is easily overcome, but I'll need to pick up more 5" plate tomorrow after work. You see, the plans called for a manual hydraulic ram jack. I decided that I would upgrade and get a set that would still be hydraulically powered, but pneumatically actuated. Cool idea, 'cept that the plans don't account for the difference in stature. Granted that difference is rather small, but still, I was slightly disappointed that I didn't catch it earlier on. Too much to think about I suppose.

    To be clear, what I am referring to is the bottom section of the ram jack. The pneumatically actuated variant has the motor housing at the bottom and to the side, whereas the manual-only variant does not. Anyway, the plans were designed for the latter, and so they look like this:


    But of course I have this:


    So when you mock up the 5" x 5" x 1/2" plate to the new jack, well, let's just say it comes up short:


    So as I mentioned I'll need to get some additional 5-by-5 plate so that I can make more of these:


    And I may even wrap it around the outer on the side near the motor housing. 'Make a tiny shelf out of it or something...

    With the jack in rough mock up position, the issue becomes readily apparent:


    Again, this is not a huge thing. I mean you could even leave it like that and you'd be alright. However I can't leave well enough alone, so "I'm gonna fizz it."

    I did manage to weld on the top mount plates for one of the ram jacks on one of the inner verticals. Then darkness got the better of me, as it has a way of doing, so that was the limit of today's progress. Applied some primer and called it a night.

    Thank you,
    Jerry

  8. #107
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    I would weld the brackets vertical on both sides of that cast base that is made for a pin. And use a pin.

    You have probably finished it by now.

  9. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by mllud22 View Post
    I would weld the brackets vertical on both sides of that cast base that is made for a pin. And use a pin.

    You have probably finished it by now.
    mllud22- Yeah, the plans call for 5/8" carriage bolts to pass through the custom brackets at both the top and bottom of the ram jack. Nah, I haven't finished yet, unfortunately. There has been an up-tick at work; we have been progressing toward an executive-level demo that will take place this week. And I'm at the epicenter of the eye of the storm, as I am the only one in the group who knows C++ (a programming language) and who has any experience in this particular area. So I've been heads-down for weeks now, working software-startup type of hours. That and I went to visit my mother in the assisted living facility this weekend. She might not know who I am but I know who she is, and it's important to go see your family when their (proverbial) legs grow tired. Ya know?

    Anyway, I have managed to work on the gantry here and there, but literally a 1/2 hour or so at a time. I did manage to finish cutting the pieces that I'll use to support the ram jacks, save the two holes that need to be cut out of the larger pieces so that the jacks can rest upon them. I also managed to weld the upper brackets to the outside of both of the inner verticals and get them into primer. But that's the extent of it for me. I hope to revisit the gantry project by week's end. We'll see. Life's gifts dontchaknow.

    Here are a few pictures of the progress to-date in the aforementioned tasks, and as always thank you for your interest in my build!
    Thanks,
    Jerry


    Last edited by av8or1; 08-18-2019 at 07:35 PM.

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    Hi y'all,

    I plan to make time to revisit the gantry project later today. So I should have an update soon on whatever I am able to get done. In the meantime I thought I'd share a picture that an old work buddy sent to me last night. He is aware of my gantry project and thought I'd get a good laugh out of the rig shown here:


    Thought I'd share it with the forum. Holy hell!

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    Quote Originally Posted by av8or1 View Post
    Hi y'all,

    I plan to make time to revisit the gantry project later today. So I should have an update soon on whatever I am able to get done. In the meantime I thought I'd share a picture that an old work buddy sent to me last night. He is aware of my gantry project and thought I'd get a good laugh out of the rig shown here:


    Thought I'd share it with the forum. Holy hell!
    General consensus is the pic is photoshop, you must have missed the thread on it:
    Wrong way to pull motor

  12. #111
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    Hah! Yup, I missed that thread. Thank you for the link though Rob. Interesting replies.

    If he *did* photoshop it, that's one helluva job.

    And I shoulda known that this picture would have already made its way to this forum.

  13. #112
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    The engine was probably added to the beam on the ladders, look at where there should be a hook on the hoist to hang the engine from.

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    Quick update:

    Well they continue to tell us at work that things should return to normal now that our initial delivery window has passed. Yet it hasn't. Today was the first day I haven't worked since May I think. And that is only because of an internal server error that brought things to a halt. So I decided to take advantage of it by getting back outside and attempting to make progress on the gantry. I managed to finish welding the first ram jack support into place on one of the outer verticals. I also did a little grinding with the flap disc and then finished it off with primer. This one remains in need of paint, as darkness fell long before enough time had passed such that the paint could be applied after the primer dried. The other ram jack support plate on the other outer vertical is still to-go; not sure when I'll be able to get around to it though. I'm hoping for things to actually taper off at work in the next few days, and if so, then maybe one night this week. TBD.

    I will say in retrospect that I don't recommend welding when you're tired. I did that when I put these corner plates together however long ago it was. Being tired and feeling rushed, I didn't pay close enough attention to my fit-up. It was only after I had welded it out that I noticed that one side has a warp, even with 1/2" plate. Fortunately the side in question is the non-load-bearing side, so really it doesn't matter much. I proceeded with the plan to put a support plate underneath it, despite the warp and the questionable need. When I did there was about a 1/8" to 1/4" gap between the support plate and the bottom of the warped half of the ram jack support (again, the non-load-bearing side). Not a big whoop, I just turned down the amperage and filled it with a single 7018 weave pass. Anyway TMI because it's an insignificant component ... so I digress.

    Here are a few pictures, perhaps you can get an idea of what I was attempting to do:




    Thank you for reading. Y'all take care until I can circle the wagons back 'round to the gantry project. Hope all is well.
    Jerry

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    Well this was a bit of a surprise.

    Things felt quite different at work today. I've gotten so much done recently that frankly there isn't that much remaining on my agenda. Therefore I told myself that when I got home this afternoon I was gonna spend more time outside. I'll tell y'all that was a welcome change in thinking!

    First was the gantry. I'd really like to close this project out so that I can get Ol' Blue (one of my Crown Victorias) back on the road again. The wife still likes the color much more than Whitey (a different CV). Provided it's reliable she would like to begin driving it instead. And I have another project for Whitey. Anyway so the gantry: I mocked up the other ram jack support and ran a few beads:


    However my old nemesis The Dark was coming on quickly; the long days of summer light are over unfortunately. Seems like it's getting dark earlier every night. Oh well. I decided to pack up, let it cool down and then cover the beads in primer. Looks like we might get some rain at some point soon. So this was a just-in-case type of thing.

    Then I did some automotive related stuff with one of my Crown Victorias (my son helped!) and we called it a night.

    Hopefully there's more of this in my future!

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    Keep up the good work!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob F. View Post
    Keep up the good work!
    Thank you Rob.

    The latest news is that I told management that I wouldn't be working this weekend, as things seem rather in-hand and after almost 4 months of working everyday, I've had enough. We had some family stuff to do but I got around to the gantry in the late afternoon. Save a little touch-up and paint, I managed to finish the second ram jack support and get it into primer:


    So now both sets of verticals are ready for the next item on the agenda:


    And speaking of that, have you ever noticed that the smallest tasks often require the most time? Well I have, and it seems to be true on most any project I've ever done, regardless of context. And these ram jack supports stayed true to that form. However that isn't the end of it; I still need to drill the weep holes near the bottom, as well as support holes every so far. I've informally decided on every 6 inches, since the maximum travel of the ram jack is only 18 inches. I had thought that I'd just drill holes at the minimum and maximum travel points, and I dunno, when I get 'round to actually drilling the holes, I may end up doing that. We'll see. But more hole drilling is next. Ugggghh.

    After that, I won't be able to dodge it any longer, the time will have come. Specifically, the time to stand the gantry. I've pretty much decided on how I plan on going about doing that, based on all of the other approaches that I've seen or read about. But more on that subject later.

    The family is calling, gotta go.

    Y'all take care!
    Jerry

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    Quote Originally Posted by mllud22 View Post
    I would weld the brackets vertical on both sides of that cast base that is made for a pin. And use a pin.

    You have probably finished it by now.
    Don’t count on it. Going on nearly a year since the build started.

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    Family duties dominated the day again today, but no complaints. I did get out to the gantry in the early evening. I had hoped to drill at least one of the support holes (on one side) tonight, but didn't quite make it even that far, unfortunately. I decided that I would at least attempt to drill the support holes as evenly as a guy-in-a-garage reasonably could; the idea being to attempt to minimize the amount of uneven-ness of the main beam once it is in an elevated position and the pins are installed. To do that would require some configuration/setup, so I spent my time on that instead. I began by establishing a baseline reference with the zero point being the bottom of two of the feet of the outer verticals. I would have preferred a longer reference line, but didn't feel up to dragging the main beam into place. This was the result:


    I then repeated that basic idea at the top, where both verticals were in their lowest position with the pin locked. The good news was that there was little-to-no variance with the straight edge applied to the main beam support plates on each respective inner vertical. The plan was to then extend each of those inner verticals the same distance and drill a hole. Unfortunately The Dark was setting in again, so I decided that it would be best to wait until I could see to attempt to drill holes at relatively precise locations.

    However I thought it would be interesting to give the system an initial test. So I raised the end with the main beam supports, put a car dolly underneath it and connected my flapjack air compressor. And I can report that this part, at least, operated "like butta":


    Next will be to finish drilling the holes, which won't be trivial since I need to flip the set over (these things are h-e-a-v-y) and ensure that the holes will align from side-to-side. Eh, that's not too bad really, and made easier by the fact that I have a pin that I can leave inserted on the bottom. So it'll be the physical challenge as much as anything else.

    And I still need to paint. And stand it. Yeah the Balrog is waiting around the corner...

    Thank you for reading,
    Jerry

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    Made time tonight to attend to the final hole drilling work on the gantry. You might recall that WRT the number of holes that are drilled into the inner verticals as the main beam rises in height, I was undecided. In the end, I went with a total of three of these "support holes", one at minimum height (where the inner is completely inside the outer vertical and is resting on the foot), one at the middle height, and finally one at max height. Since the ram jacks have a maximum travel distance of 18" that means that there will be one "support hole" at 9" and then another at 18". And of course the purpose of these holes is simply to allow re-insertion of the pins while the beam is extended above the lowest position in order to provide even more support for a given load, as well as an extra margin of safety.

    I also drilled the weep holes at the bottom of the outer verticals to allow whatever wet stuff that manages to get inside to drain back out:


    Although I didn't try to do this, the respective weep holes aligned such that the pin could go through them - hah!


    So now all that remains is to re-paint the verticals where necessary and install the ram jacks. Unfortunately that was as far as I would get today, as The Dark came around all too quickly:


    As the project begins to draw to a close things seem to be happening more quickly than they used to. But that's a good thing, as I am ready to put it to work.

    And with that, the time has come. As mentioned, I cannot get around it any longer. It is time to stand the gantry. This task has become the one item that I dread the most while yet being the one that I anticipate the most. I mean, this thing is a beast, so standing it is not something to be taken lightly. But anyway, more on that later.

    Y'all take care,
    Jerry


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