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  1. #21
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    Well I removed the inching mechanism and gave the lift a try and it would’nt even move at all then, so I reached down and yanked the inching plunger all the way in and the lift was then pushing the wheel chocks across the shop floor on half throttle! So, that’s cool. I think that disabling that mechanism is the way to go. Full pressure and control. I can use N if I need to speed up the pump for long lifts. My sloped driveway is such that any neutral devices makes it hard to use the lift, and this was a big factor moving from the electric to the propane model.
    Thanks for the helps!

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by berk View Post
    Well I removed the inching mechanism and gave the lift a try and it would’nt even move at all then, so I reached down and yanked the inching plunger all the way in and the lift was then pushing the wheel chocks across the shop floor on half throttle! So, that’s cool. I think that disabling that mechanism is the way to go. Full pressure and control. I can use N if I need to speed up the pump for long lifts. My sloped driveway is such that any neutral devices makes it hard to use the lift, and this was a big factor moving from the electric to the propane model.
    Thanks for the helps!
    Your inch mechanism was probably dirty or out of adjustment. Now that you know the lift is good you can put the inching back on, being sure to lube and adjust it. Mine was not used much before I got it so the parts were not moving as they should. There are times when I am unloading something that using the inch is the only way to get back from the truck without jerking the lift.

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  4. #23
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    It was out of adjustment yes, but I’m not sure how using it gives more control. Backing away from a truck is one of my challenges with the slopes driveway, and having the lift stay in reverse without dumping trans pressure seems like it would only be a benefit. This lift definitely didn’t have a separate brake pedal setup, it has two pedals but they are both the same inching system.
    I always thought of the inching system as a way to speed up operation for operators that drive all day. For my home shop the forklift is a luxury way to lift and position things, so I’m willing to trade speed for control. I can always bang into neutral for long lifts.

  5. #24
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    I hear you on the sloped driveway, I deal with mine every time I unload a truck. I wanted a manual transmission but the lift I got had this auto, most do anymore. The Cat I had before was a real manual (2 speed). Super easy to do anything. I should have kept it and changed masts.
    I look at the inching mechanism as something they spent a lot of money and time developing so it useful in most situations. If you put the lift in N to speed the lifting and you are on a slope dont you push the brake pedal to keep from rolling? Let the brake pedal put it in N for you. Just make sure the inching plunger is in max power position when brake pedal is all the way up. That way when a buddy is over and you have him do something with your lift he doesn't put it through a wall or into the door of your truck because your lift is different than most others. "Uuhh, sorry man, I put on the brakes but it wouldn't stop.... the one at work doesn't do that."

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  7. #25
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    Well if what I’m learning is true it seems that most dual brake lifts have inching on left pedal and right pedal is not part of that, so buddies using the lift would likely default to right foot braking which would be the same as my disabled inching system lift. It’s only proficient lift users that take advantage of the inching system to make their lift life more efficient. My old baker seems to be an outlier in that it has dual brake pedals but they are linked and the same. In any case I tack welded the linkage so we will give it a shot and see how it works.

  8. #26
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    The main problem is, most inching pedals on old forklifts don’t work very well and are hard to get adjusted right, and trying to use them causes erratic operation. Also, inching pedals are mainly for production work. IMO, you are better suited to just use the brake for smoother operation, and just kick it into neutral when you need to give throttle for the forks to raise.

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  10. #27
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    I dont know where the term inching pedal came from...........the device is a transmission neutral control.........and essential if you want to work at any kind of efficient speed.

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  12. #28
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    5cc3a159-af7f-40cb-8e4d-4e203559a821.jpg

    Replaced fuel gauge with a volt meter, and new oil pressure gauge because old one was cracked. Also fashioned a plastic bushing for the shift lever out of plastic plumbing parts to tighten up the action a little.

  13. #29
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    I agree that the term "inching pedal" seems odd to me as it disengages the tranny, but ????

    We just had that set-up bypassed on our 5K truck.
    Seemed that brake fluid was dissapearing into the tranny.

    Now both pedals are brakes and they are tight!

    Have all new brakes and master cyls on this machine and yet we were losing fluid and sucking air in the brakes all too soon.
    I'd rather have a clutch....


    -------------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

  14. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post
    I agree that the term "inching pedal" seems odd to me as it disengages the tranny, but ????

    We just had that set-up bypassed on our 5K truck.
    Seemed that brake fluid was dissapearing into the tranny.

    Now both pedals are brakes and they are tight!

    Have all new brakes and master cyls on this machine and yet we were losing fluid and sucking air in the brakes all too soon.
    I'd rather have a clutch....


    -------------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox
    I’d rather have a clutch too on most days, except the fact that by the time I usually get a clutch it’s worn out lol. Plus, the buddy/girlfriend driving factor makes a clutch a bad idea.


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