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  1. #21
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    Macgyver, there is an adjustment on the clutch dump valve and brake pedal. My Allis was jumpy, I fooled with the linkage and its really smooth now.

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  3. #22
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    My preference would be for a Toyota 7FGCU-25 or 30 (5K rated) with the Toyota 4Y LPG engine. Excellent ergonomics, parts availability, and longevity (30K hours if well maintained). Stay away from the Clarks and gc25k Cats. They were a PITA to work on, the Mit engine in the Cats liked timing belts and had a shit LPG fuel system, lousy ergonomics, and you get to order "pricey" cat parts.

    I had a little experience with early 90's Nissans, though I cant remember models. I found them mechanically and operator friendly.

    Whatever you do, stay away from the 70's and 80's crap that is wore out and no longer part supported by the manufacturers. That is just a headache you don't need...Some will say "but you can get them cheap". If you're interested in productivity, you won't waste your time or money.

    Cushion tires are fine for hard pavement, but, as was said earlier, they are worthless off pavement. You'll need to make a tire decision.

    Just an FYI...a 7FGCU-25 or 30 weighs 8K lbs. Counterweight alone is 3K lbs.

    Hope this helps. Good luck with your search. PB

  4. #23
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    I have four old forklifts three are really old one just old. The two oldest are Hyster's a 20 and7K with pneumatic tires, the old one is a Mits/Cat 5K with air tires, last is a lil Clark Clipper that goes where none of the others could. My Mits is an FG 25 and it is an OK lift, it does have a quirky LPG system. Mr. Packard sez avoid them? Can't say I would agree but, this one has low hours about 2000 and it is used weekly not daily.

    As someone else noted the old skool Hyster's are great machines but "big boned" That is an advantage in most cases where you are lifting stuff, my Hyster's do yeoman's duty. The area where they lack is in lift height, the Mits is my only forklift with a three stage mast. That was the compelling reason to buy it. Two things I would suggest as musts for a one and only forklift is air tires and three stage mast with free lift.

    I have a big shop with high ceilings and big clumsy old forklifts work well here, in close spaces a small lift like my FG25 are far more practical. One thing about forklifts, when you start using them they become indispensable.

    Steve

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  6. #24
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    I'm into 2 forklifts, that little orange monster in the upper left, a 3k and a Hyster 7k.

    Both have their strengths the little guy is outstanding in a tight shop and can do so many tasks except the big machines. Hyster has some extra counterweight they don't advertise, maybe 25% more.

    Both have extensive rework and repairs, the Hyster has a Chevrolet 250-6 engine and the Clark a Y112 continental flathead. So far I have found parts for everything I needed. They basically idle around most of the time.

    I dislike the Monotrol and would prefer a column shifter. I do like the 3 stage freelift mast. If you have asphalt you might start rutting it or even breaking holes thru it if the underlying grade isn't solid. The worst is ruts that developed right at the concrete apron to the shop door that I filled back with shallow concrete. I try to move the heaviest stuff in dead of winter or heat of summer. Spring is the worst with mushy subgrade....someday more concrete is coming for part of the driveway.

  7. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by matt_isserstedt View Post
    I'm into 2 forklifts, that little orange monster in the upper left, a 3k and a Hyster 7k.

    Both have their strengths the little guy is outstanding in a tight shop and can do so many tasks except the big machines. Hyster has some extra counterweight they don't advertise, maybe 25% more.

    Both have extensive rework and repairs, the Hyster has a Chevrolet 250-6 engine and the Clark a Y112 continental flathead. So far I have found parts for everything I needed. They basically idle around most of the time.

    I dislike the Monotrol and would prefer a column shifter. I do like the 3 stage freelift mast. If you have asphalt you might start rutting it or even breaking holes thru it if the underlying grade isn't solid. The worst is ruts that developed right at the concrete apron to the shop door that I filled back with shallow concrete. I try to move the heaviest stuff in dead of winter or heat of summer. Spring is the worst with mushy subgrade....someday more concrete is coming for part of the driveway.
    What Matt says about the monotrol pedal. I owned one years ago they take a fair bit of getting used to and tricky if not used to having forward/reverse on the gas pedal.
    Hodge

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    Quote Originally Posted by packardbill View Post
    My preference would be for a Toyota 7FGCU-25 or 30 (5K rated) with the Toyota 4Y LPG engine. Excellent ergonomics, parts availability, and longevity (30K hours if well maintained). Stay away from the Clarks and gc25k Cats. They were a PITA to work on, the Mit engine in the Cats liked timing belts and had a shit LPG fuel system, lousy ergonomics, and you get to order "pricey" cat parts.
    Totally agree with the comments on the Toyotas. The 4Y is easy to work on, and there are enough YouTube videos on troubleshooting the fuel system that you can approach repairs with confidence.
    I recently bought a neglected 5FGC25 and it's been easy to work on and the parts availability is awesome. Walk into the local parts store and tell them you have a 1988 Toyota Van LE with the 4Y motor and walk out with cheap engine and ignition parts. Our local Toyota Forklift dealer can access any part on the machine in a couple of days (even in Canada), and for the most part, the parts prices are reasonable (except I priced out a new seat from Toyota, and it was 25X the aftermarket price). My more recent experience with a Daewoo GC20-S (Daewoo bought the tooling from Cat) was that parts were hard to find, if you could find them at all. I needed to have a new radiator built for it recently, and the cost of the rad was similar to what I paid for the Toyota. Putting it in was a major pain in the ass (you need to pull the counterweight)

  9. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by martinberryman View Post
    My more recent experience with a Daewoo GC20-S (Daewoo bought the tooling from Cat) was that parts were hard to find, if you could find them at all. I needed to have a new radiator built for it recently, and the cost of the rad was similar to what I paid for the Toyota. Putting it in was a major pain in the ass (you need to pull the counterweight)
    I had to do some repairs on my Daewoo a couple years ago, Doosan took over the Daewoo line and they were able to provide all the parts, although many of the parts were labeled CAT. There was 1 oil pressure switch that internet search showed as being a CAT part, but no CAT dealer seemed able to find it, had to order it from an online parts broker.

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  11. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hodge View Post
    What Matt says about the monotrol pedal. I owned one years ago they take a fair bit of getting used to and tricky if not used to having forward/reverse on the gas pedal.
    Hodge
    The worst thing Hyster ever developed was the Monotrol. It might have worked great in the warehouse, but is awful trying to be easy moving machines. It's just an electric switch, I wonder if you could take the switch off the gas pedal and just mount a forward/reverse switch on the dash?

  12. #29
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    I love love love my 5k Toyota. I would never recommend going overweight, but I've heard that if you weld up a basket and hang it off the back with a thousand pounds of scrap in it, a 5k Toyota will pick up a 6k weldment at a 40" load center without any fuss.

    For occasional use I'd rather have a reliable 4k lift than a 5k lift that might or might not start.

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    Quote Originally Posted by m16ty View Post
    The worst thing Hyster ever developed was the Monotrol. It might have worked great in the warehouse, but is awful trying to be easy moving machines. It's just an electric switch, I wonder if you could take the switch off the gas pedal and just mount a forward/reverse switch on the dash?
    I was actually moving some long equipment out of a plant on a sloped ramp recently. They have me the use of a hyster with the monotrol pedal. Royal aggravation trying to angle through a doorway on a ramp and keeping it balanced while juggling the lazy response of the pedal.
    Hodge

  14. #31
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    My Monotrol is hydraulic with 3 little lines coming out of the arm of the pedal.

    One thing that I "fixed" on the Clark and not yet on the Hyster is that the transmission goes into neutral when the brake is depressed. I know that's for warehouse use where everything is 18 feet high and the driver is impatient and revs the engine to get the hydraulic pump turning faster. For rigging it sucks when I need to hold and then want to inch back or forward....instead I get a little clunk/jerk as the clutch packs apply which is always unnerving.

    I can stand the extra heat of shearing fluid in the torque converter while holding with the brake in the name of smoothness....

    The one thing I forgot to mention above is that I was able to acquire parts and service manuals from ebay over some time. They have been of great assistance in fixing these beasts.

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    We have a '95 Toyota FG35? propane at the shop which sees daily outdoor service moving packs of lumber and plywood "bunks" in an unpaved yard. It's amazing how tough this lift is and still purrs like a new one.

  16. #33
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    I like hyster and komatsu as far as used forklifts go. A good forklift shop says Nissan is good to, but that isnt coming from my experience.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

  17. #34
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    How "offroad" are the little cushion tired machines good for. Periodically I need to move a chassis out into a hard packed gravel parking off of the concrete/asphalt pad around my shop.

    I currently use a whooped V40 from the 80s that leaks more than the Exxon Valdez. It does ok on the hard pack and have stuck it a few times in the softer stuff. It has the bigger solids up front and a pneumatic little tire. Its too big for easily maneuvering around in my building though. Hence the search for a smaller more compact machine.

    I'm also looking at used machines. No idea who is good and bad. This is a good thread. I would prefer something made 2000 and up since I have to keep it for the next 40 years.

  18. #35
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    I've run my cushion tired lift about 4" off the pavement twice where it sank into the ground up to the frame. The rear tires are the worst, only 3-4" wide...

    So that wasn't exactly hard packed gravel, but you really need some compaction. I think it will also jar your fillings having essentially no suspension.

    I have an Exxon Valdez issue myself and have not yet resolved it, need to stick my head under there when running and the ~3" of ground clearance isn't enough. Definitely some fail-safe solid blocking needed as I value the watermelon on top of my neck

  19. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brett W View Post
    How "offroad" are the little cushion tired machines good for. Periodically I need to move a chassis out into a hard packed gravel parking off of the concrete/asphalt pad around my shop.
    My hard tire 5k Daewoo lives in a gravel yard, I will not even think of moving it after a rain for 3 to 5 days. If I know its going to rain I find its best to park it with rear tires on some 12" x 12" plates, if I get caught off guard, and it rains hard, it will sink rear tires if not parked on the plates. In dry weather, there are still areas of the yard it can sink in (no way of telling till you drive on it), I have a truck that can pull it out, and another lift that if need be can pluck it out of even the worst mudhole. Note: My underlying soil in Tx is black clay, it would be a much better story for my yard in Nv with underlying decomposed limestone.

    Note: A hard tire lift prefers flat/level ground, I have had the Daewoo "stuck" in a 3" dip in ground, I do not think it would ever handle the grade and unevenness of inclined driveway in Nv.

  20. #37
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    I have a pretty well compacted gravel alley behind my shop where it has to be really wet for a long time before it is a real mud hole.

    My little Datsun is magnitudes better outside of the shop than the Hyster, both hard tire machines. The Datsun is small enough both width and length that it seems to handle misalignments and dips in the ground better. (Also only weighs 4,800lbs) In comparison, the hyster seems to get scared when I open the door. I have to be very particular about approaching the grade going back in the shop straight on, if I try it at an angle it will get stopped by spinning a tire. Most times I can reverse out of it with maybe a little body english to get that tire to grab. The Datsun has been stuck more often as I get more aggressive and brave with it. I have had to pull it out of a hole with the come along a couple times.

    I am a big fan of forklifts, no way I would even try to do my work without one. I bought my Datsun before I had my shop building bought. I am one that will advise to have 2 for redundancy and different capacity.

  21. #38
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    My little Datsun is magnitudes better outside of the shop than the Hyster, both hard tire machines.
    The amount that the counterweight overhangs the rear axle is a big factor in traction. Some lifts put the steering axle close to the end of the machine, some tuck them pretty far forward. I had a Pettibone 5K pneumatic that was helpless on hard gravel without a load on the forks. and marginal with, it had the counterweight Way out past the axle. I now have a Clark with a longer wheelbase and it does much much better in all conditions.

    I see Amish using forklifts with the counterweight removed in their barnyards, they go like little tractors without the weight burying the steering tires and lifting the traction tires. They just buy bigger capacity lifts and take the counterweight off.

  22. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garwood View Post
    The Komatsu and Nissan lifts are my favorite. There's a shitload of interchange and they all use the H20 engine which will usually go about 12 million hours between oil changes and could need rings as often as every 200 years. I think they used the same exact forklift design from the late 70's through the early 2000's changing only the engine cover. I have never treated another mechanical thing as bad as I have one of these forklifts. I think after 5 or so years of horrid abuse my poor abused Komatsu actually runs better than when I bought it.
    I have a 70s or maybe 60s Datsun 5k pneumatic tire lift with a Diesel engine . It always runs. Accessory belts gone or not still goes just no alternator and don’t run it longer than it takes for the motor to warm up. I did finally get that sorted but I think the radiator leaks now. I need to put some real antifreeze in it maybe as typically I just fill with water.

    Lift is great and parts are pretty common but you have to know what cars they came from. If you don’t know sourcing parts can get tricky. All I’ve replaced is the brake calipers as they were locking up.

    I recently purchased a hyster s155xl and it does what I need it too but I hate the very narrow rear solid tires. I need to see if I can get something a bit wider and probably see if I can get traction tires as I almost only drive the lift on gravel and asphalt millings.

  23. #40
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    What if you did a dual tire setup using cushion tires? That would give a wider load distribution surface and help keep the tires from sinking in softer terrain. Obviously not going to be a real off road lift, but it would be nice to have a bit of flexibility by keeping the small tires with the tighter turning radius and the ability to roll out into a gravel parking lot or park the fork truck outside the building in the gravel without it sinking when it rains.

    Trying to have my cake and eat it too.


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