Pimpin out a trailer to make it most radical (what accessories do you wish you had)
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  1. #1
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    Default Pimpin out a trailer to make it most radical (what accessories do you wish you had)

    Finally broke down and bought a 10,000 lb dual axle 16' beavertail.

    Now I'm noticing all the things it lacks, and I lack. D rings, good quality straps, winch to pull shit up on to it, toolbox to put all your crap in to, it's own jack, spare tire holder, etc.

    So...first question. Jack. What size do you carry? Did you weld jacking points on to the trailer? It's not really tall enough to get a hydraulic jack under. Hi Lift? Not sure how that would perform with a fully loaded trailer.

    Second question...d rings. I have added these to a number of trailers. I'm not real keen on running them on the surface of the trailer because I like to push pallets on with the forklift, and those damn things always mess with my world and tear up the pallets...but round the fender walls, I can't put them on the side. Any suggestions?

    Quality straps. I've been using harbor freight my whole life. I'd like to get a couple 4" straps and a handful of 2" straps. Any suggestions on good, yet affordable brands?

    Finally, the thing I really want, but can't seem to find...is a good tarp. The ones with D Rings down the edges, then again a couple feet up.

    Any and all suggestions welcome.

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    I welded wide inverted u shaped tie down points various spots around perimeter of frame. Made of 1/2” rod. Cheaper than d-rings and not making noise all tHe time flapping around. Made them wide enough to use the straps that have wide stamped sheet metal hooks rather then hooks made of rod though the tie down points will accept both. Also added some on the tail end where they won’t interfere with ramps or loading as I need tie downs there so I can secure hay twice a year for my ongoing cattle hobby.

    Then think about making tie down points that easily accept chain binders so when you are hauling cars or machinery you can use chain. Straps cut, stretch, slide, and buzz in the wind.

    Harbor freight sells a cheap mechanical scissors lift type jack that’s not great but easier to put behind the seat of my truck than a hydraulic floor jack. Also get a “plus” sign type of lug wrench. Much easier to use and more leverage.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dalmatiangirl61 View Post
    You got a beavertail, so the last 3' is worthless, nice one!

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    Quote Originally Posted by moonlight machine View Post
    You got a beavertail, so the last 3' is worthless, nice one!
    It's true, but the seller was motivated (divorce sale) and I needed to use it the next day.

    But really it's only 2', and that would make it 18', not 16. And if I find I really need that extra 2 feet, I've got a welder and can make a nice little surface on it.

    But that is one thing I want to modify anyway. I hate things making noise as they bounce, so I need to make the damn ramps removeable.

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    Weld a piece of about 1/4 x 3 flat bar lengthwise under the stringers, in about 4" from the sides. This is for hooking straps. The straps go through the holes in the rub rails and secure to the tie bar. This way the rub rails protect the straps. You wrap the flat hook straps once around the tie bar. This way if the strap becomes loose it won't come off. Chains are looped around the rub rail standoffs or stake pockets and don't go around the outside of the rub rail.

    As for tarps, look up trucker tarps or hay tarps. After you see the cost of new, you will be searching craigslist or facebook. Then after you get the tarp, you will need about 4 dozen bungie cords. You hook them in every D ring on the tarp and stretch them to either the edge of the trailer or another D ring. You've got to shred a couple of tarps before you figure out how to properly secure them. Square loads like hay its not a problem. Odd shapes like machinery present challenges.

    If you have a permanent winch, install a solar charger to keep the battery charged.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gbent View Post
    Weld a piece of about 1/4 x 3 flat bar lengthwise under the stringers, in about 4" from the sides. This is for hooking straps. The straps go through the holes in the rub rails and secure to the tie bar. This way the rub rails protect the straps. You wrap the flat hook straps once around the tie bar. This way if the strap becomes loose it won't come off. Chains are looped around the rub rail standoffs or stake pockets and don't go around the outside of the rub rail.

    As for tarps, look up trucker tarps or hay tarps. After you see the cost of new, you will be searching craigslist or facebook. Then after you get the tarp, you will need about 4 dozen bungie cords. You hook them in every D ring on the tarp and stretch them to either the edge of the trailer or another D ring. You've got to shred a couple of tarps before you figure out how to properly secure them. Square loads like hay its not a problem. Odd shapes like machinery present challenges.

    If you have a permanent winch, install a solar charger to keep the battery charged.
    What's a rub rail?

    This sounds a lot like how we used to strap steel down on the stake trucks. In that case the ratchets were permanently attached to the truck bed.

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    When I built my power tilt car trailer (that has hauled 99% machinery/ 1% vehicles) I milled up six 3/8" steel plates with a round hole in the center and a 1/2" slot or two leading out from center. Welded those flush in the deck. Drop chains through and hook into slot. They have been very well used and held up great over the years.

    On the sides I took groups of several of the short pieces of channel left over from the frame and welded them on vertical. Then I layed a piece of 3/8 x 2.5" flatbar, formed the ends back into the frame and welded everything together. They work well for straps, chains, whatever.

    I bought a new 6000 lb Warn winch for my trailer when I built it 21 years ago. That thing was always a piece of shit and never had enough balls to pull without a snatch block. I have a 17,500 superwinch on there now and it's a bit overkill. I carry snatch blocks too. I'd suggest a winch brand that people don't want to steal like harbor freight. I've never had one stolen, but I've had to park my trailer overnight in some sketchy places and that's always on my mind.

    I've had a lot of flat trailer tires. I carry a spare and I always a carry a short piece of heavy chain I can use to chain an axle up and get to the next tire store if I happen to lose two tires in a trip (happens way too often to me). Fucking trailer tires have cost me more than a few hotel rooms over the years. I carry a heavy lug wrench and a pair of 5 ton bottle jacks that will fit under the axle with the tire flat. I carry two because one doesn't have enough stroke to put the new tire on. I lift all the way with one, then I screw the extension out on the second one and lift it up another few inches to get the tire back on.

    A floor jack is useless. A hilift jack is not the best. You will get a flat when you have 20K lbs on your 10k trailer guaranteed, not when it's empty. If you try to lift by the frame to raise a tire off the ground you'll need a forklift to get it high enough.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Garwood View Post
    I carry two because one doesn't have enough stroke to put the new tire on. I lift all the way with one, then I screw the extension out on the second one and lift it up another few inches to get the tire back on.
    I always try to carry extra cribbing and pull the good tire up on some cribbing so the jack doesn't have to do so much work.

    Check your tire temperatures and hub temperatures with your hand when you stop. You may find a bad bearing or low tire before it causes grief.

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    Sounds like you bought an "Appalachian" brand trailer.
    Bottom of the barrel, lowest cost trailer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    Sounds like you bought an "Appalachian" brand trailer.
    Bottom of the barrel, lowest cost trailer.
    No...”quality equipment”. I could flip it right now and make a grand on it...so I’m not too concerned about where it falls on the barrel. It’s got four wheel brakes, center grease bearings and new tires. Can’t ask for much more.

    It has tie down points, but the spacing is all wrong for what I do.

    I’ve been renting trailers every time I need them for years. Probably paid for a good trailer a few times over.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    The most radical trailer feature I can think of is lights that work every time I hook up to it. Ugh.

  16. #13
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    Well, what you'll wish you bought is a Butler tilt bed trailer,
    Bulter Trailer - Home

    I bought a 2 year old LT-1014 about 25 years ago. Welded a smooth 3/8" plate between the 2 rear tail ramps, and mounted a 12klb winch up front. The bolts and nuts that secure the winch are welded.....no one has ever stolen the winch. Works just like a roll back, tilts down to 3/4" of the ground, and the angle is nice and shallow. Easy to drag mills, turret lathes, etc right up on the deck after minimally blocking them up about 1" high on one side. The one thing that would be a cool addition would be a hydraulic telescopic tongue. So you could back up close to a machine, then telescope the trailer back and under the machine. That would make loading a 1 man operation.

    Other than that, what you'll need is about 40 D Rings and a dozen weld-on hooks spread around the perimeter for securing loads. Seems like you can never have enough tie down points, or the're never in the right place. A ratchet strap rail is also a worth while addition, so you can use the plate hook type "tractor trailer" straps.
    Harbor Freight straps are thin and light duty.....crap. Tractor supply had some decent ones, but the truck supply stores have the real deal heavy duty ones that you'll want.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gbent View Post
    I always try to carry extra cribbing and pull the good tire up on some cribbing so the jack doesn't have to do so much work.

    Check your tire temperatures and hub temperatures with your hand when you stop. You may find a bad bearing or low tire before it causes grief.
    I had a flat on my car hauler flatbed when I was hauling some sheet metal machinery home. It was a rear tire so I broke the lug nuts loose and then pulled the front tire onto a few pieces of 2x10 that I leave in the bed of my truck for when I'm towing my 5th wheel camper. It's faster and easier than digging the trucks jack out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by snowman View Post
    No...”quality equipment”. I could flip it right now and make a grand on it...so I’m not too concerned about where it falls on the barrel. It’s got four wheel brakes, center grease bearings and new tires. Can’t ask for much more.

    It has tie down points, but the spacing is all wrong for what I do.

    I’ve been renting trailers every time I need them for years. Probably paid for a good trailer a few times over.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Perhaps Digger Doug could post some pictures of his awesome trailer that is top of the barrel.

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  22. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by snowman View Post
    Finally broke down and bought a 10,000 lb dual axle 16' beavertail.

    Now I'm noticing all the things it lacks, and I lack. D rings, good quality straps, winch to pull shit up on to it, toolbox to put all your crap in to, it's own jack, spare tire holder, etc.

    So...first question. Jack. What size do you carry? Did you weld jacking points on to the trailer? It's not really tall enough to get a hydraulic jack under. Hi Lift? Not sure how that would perform with a fully loaded trailer.

    Second question...d rings. I have added these to a number of trailers. I'm not real keen on running them on the surface of the trailer because I like to push pallets on with the forklift, and those damn things always mess with my world and tear up the pallets...but round the fender walls, I can't put them on the side. Any suggestions?

    Quality straps. I've been using harbor freight my whole life. I'd like to get a couple 4" straps and a handful of 2" straps. Any suggestions on good, yet affordable brands?

    Finally, the thing I really want, but can't seem to find...is a good tarp. The ones with D Rings down the edges, then again a couple feet up.

    Any and all suggestions welcome.
    This is where I bought my tarp:

    Semi Trailer Rolling Tarp Systems From Verduyn Tarps

    Try and buy the smallest tarp you need, these things way a ton and can be a royal pain to put over a machine by yourself!

    Kevin

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    Quote Originally Posted by Big B View Post
    Perhaps Digger Doug could post some pictures of his awesome trailer that is top of the barrel.
    Didn't say that, but Appalachian trailers are the worst, seen them come into my neighbors weld shop for all kinds of "additions" that the purchasers didn't see when they were blinded by the low price.

    And structural items as well. You know (or maybe you don't) how wood deck flat bed trailers use 6" channel along the sides, and 3"-4" channel as cross pieces ?
    Appalachian uses 1/4" x 6" flat there, get's all mangled up in no time.
    Has very little strength.

    EDIT: I just looked up "Quality Trailers" they use the same rub rail (flat 1/4" plate) however, theirs is only 4".....
    Grease fittings on axles and brakes on both axles is pretty much standard, and brakes all around is the law these days.

    Appalachian ramps are very cheap design, seems that what the biggest repair to come in. And mods to make them work better.

    why don't YOU show us your trailer Uncle BigB ?

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    One more thing, get some old fire hose to protect machines when using chain binders, it will also protect your ratchet straps on sharp edges!

    Kevin

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    Lowboy trailers have swing out braces for overwidth work....that'll
    be different for sure.

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    Don't forget some weld-on grab hooks the same size as your transport chain. Also not bad to have some kind of lockable box(es) for tool and storage etc.


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