Pimpin out a trailer to make it most radical (what accessories do you wish you had) - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by dkmc View Post
    I bought a 2 year old LT-1014 about 25 years ago. Welded a smooth 3/8" plate between the 2 rear tail ramps, and mounted a 12klb winch up front. The bolts and nuts that secure the winch are welded.....no one has ever stolen the winch. Works just like a roll back, tilts down to 3/4" of the ground, and the angle is nice and shallow. Easy to drag mills, turret lathes, etc right up on the deck after minimally blocking them up about 1" high on one side. The one thing that would be a cool addition would be a hydraulic telescopic tongue. So you could back up close to a machine, then telescope the trailer back and under the machine. That would make loading a 1 man operation.
    I have used a local tow truck guy to move a few things and he has a similar trailer, just longer.
    He uses it quite a lot and has everything hooked up to run on remote control. The winch is remote, the hydraulic tilt is remote. So when he moved my crane you get in and drive it on like normal and then before getting out he just pushes the down button on the tilt.
    Even better was to move a 24' truck box. Back up to about 3' from the front of the box and left truck running. push the tilt down button to tilt the trailer almost to the ground. Hit the truck reverse button and the truck backs itself up to the edge of the load, adjusting tilt on trailer as needed to get under the front edge. Hook up winch and pull on as normal.
    The backing was pretty sweet.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Archer120x View Post
    The most radical trailer feature I can think of is lights that work every time I hook up to it. Ugh.
    Switching over to LED lights cured that problem for me.

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  4. #23
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    US Cargo Control has good selection of load securing stuff. They are in Iowa so only a day or two away on ground shipping.
    Ratchet Straps, Tie Down Straps, E Track Tie Downs, Cargo Straps - U.S. Cargo Control

    I got rid of my faithful "car carrier" trailer last year and bought a 20' long deck over flat trailer. Put a small job box on the tongue and keep all my load securing stuff in the job box. Here is what I keep in the box.

    Chains (2 x 20' with grab hooks both ends and a bunch of 4' long with grab hook one end)
    Ratcheting binders (the yellow ones have zinc plated screws on them. Which is essential for intermittent use because most binders don't have plating on the screws and the rust up)
    v-boards for protecting corners
    straps
    wheel straps
    tow hooks that insert into the factory slots on cars (there are three styles)
    cheap "come-along"
    some chunks of 2x4

    My concept is that I have a baseline of stuff in the box that I can grab the trailer and bring home a random machine or disabled vehicle. It lives on the trailer and is always there.

  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dualkit View Post
    Switching over to LED lights cured that problem for me.
    I've had a miserable time with LED marker lights. Might have found decent ones now.

  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    Didn't say that, but Appalachian trailers are the worst, seen them come into my neighbors weld shop for all kinds of "additions" that the purchasers didn't see when they were blinded by the low price.

    And structural items as well. You know (or maybe you don't) how wood deck flat bed trailers use 6" channel along the sides, and 3"-4" channel as cross pieces ?
    Appalachian uses 1/4" x 6" flat there, get's all mangled up in no time.
    Has very little strength.

    EDIT: I just looked up "Quality Trailers" they use the same rub rail (flat 1/4" plate) however, theirs is only 4".....
    Grease fittings on axles and brakes on both axles is pretty much standard, and brakes all around is the law these days.

    Appalachian ramps are very cheap design, seems that what the biggest repair to come in. And mods to make them work better.

    why don't YOU show us your trailer Uncle BigB ?
    I don't have any pictures of my trailer at the moment but I just rebuilt it recently and it's still getting the job done. Probably also what you would consider a bottom of the barrel trailer. I've had if for about 30 years. It's a 1988 16 foot Amarillo flatbed with built in ramps. Only has brakes on one axle. No d-rings. Two foot beavertail. But it has hauled every piece of equipment in my shop except my cnc machining center and also hauled dozens if not hundreds of vehicles. Maybe I'll go take a picture of it and see if I can figure out how to post a pic here.

    I just had to bust your balls because it appears to me by most of your posts that you like that kind of thing.

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  8. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big B View Post
    I don't have any pictures of my trailer at the moment but I just rebuilt it recently and it's still getting the job done. Probably also what you would consider a bottom of the barrel trailer. I've had if for about 30 years. It's a 1988 16 foot Amarillo flatbed with built in ramps. Only has brakes on one axle. No d-rings. Two foot beavertail. But it has hauled every piece of equipment in my shop except my cnc machining center and also hauled dozens if not hundreds of vehicles. Maybe I'll go take a picture of it and see if I can figure out how to post a pic here.

    I just had to bust your balls because it appears to me by most of your posts that you like that kind of thing.
    I have justification for my actions. I commented on it, because of the junk I see, the designs I have made, and the few trailers I have built or worked on.

    I don't like it, but want to keep the record straight, there are garbage trailers out there. Tell me how the OP is supposed to add "D" rings to that trailer with no rub rail, and only 3" channel underneath the wood ?

    Too many people buy on price alone.

  9. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by gbent View Post
    I always try to carry extra cribbing and pull the good tire up on some cribbing so the jack doesn't have to do so much work.

    Check your tire temperatures and hub temperatures with your hand when you stop. You may find a bad bearing or low tire before it causes grief.
    I hear you 100%. What undoubtedly happens with cribbing is it gets used on the trailer deck and buried under 3000 pounds of shit in the bed. I can always get to my toolbox though, so I keep 2 bottle jacks in there.

    I had to buy those two bottle jacks at an auto parts store in another state because my cribbing was inadvertently used under a load and I could find nothing to drive up onto, not even a convenient curb.

  10. #28
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  11. #29
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    One thing that I did for my flatbed car hauler that took me about 30 years to realize that I needed was new lug nuts. My trailer spent some time sitting outdoors and I hadn't had the wheels off in a few years. When I rebuilt it I put new tires on it and sandblasted and painted the wheels while I was at it. The lug nuts were a TOTAL BITCH to get off with all the rust. This is in spite of the fact that I keep the threads oiled up when I have them off for any reason. I bought a set of chrome lugnuts that cover the ends of the studs and can't imagine how much water can get in there now. It probably doesn't seem like a big deal but if you are sitting on the side of the expressway the last thing you need to worry about is stubborn lugnuts.

    Another thing that I did for my 5th wheel RV is add tire pressure monitors, and in the few years that I've been using it, it has saved me three times from probable damage to my RV. I haven't decided if I need to put them on the car hauler yet but if you are looking to add bling to your trailer, they can be had for around $50 now, compared to the $300 that I paid eight or ten years ago.

  12. #30
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    What about these? No fussing about with strap storage when not in use. No need to secure both end of the straps.


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  14. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big B View Post
    This is in spite of the fact that I keep the threads oiled up when I have them off for any reason. I bought a set of chrome lugnuts that cover the ends of the studs and can't imagine how much water can get in there now.
    Do yourself a favor and buy a can of anti-seize. Copper or nickel doesn't matter, either will work. It lasts much better than oil, especially in the rust prone environment of southern Michigan.

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  16. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spud View Post
    What about these? No fussing about with strap storage when not in use. No need to secure both end of the straps.

    Only really usable for strapping straight over the top of something, not for angled pulls. Pretty decent for strapping stacks of lumber, not so much for a top heavy machine tools.

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  18. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    Didn't say that, but Appalachian trailers are the worst, seen them come into my neighbors weld shop for all kinds of "additions" that the purchasers didn't see when they were blinded by the low price.

    And structural items as well. You know (or maybe you don't) how wood deck flat bed trailers use 6" channel along the sides, and 3"-4" channel as cross pieces ?
    Appalachian uses 1/4" x 6" flat there, get's all mangled up in no time.
    Has very little strength.

    EDIT: I just looked up "Quality Trailers" they use the same rub rail (flat 1/4" plate) however, theirs is only 4".....
    Grease fittings on axles and brakes on both axles is pretty much standard, and brakes all around is the law these days.

    Appalachian ramps are very cheap design, seems that what the biggest repair to come in. And mods to make them work better.

    why don't YOU show us your trailer Uncle BigB ?
    the current "quality" doesn't show the model i have. so i either have the bastard stepchild, or they've changed ownership/names. not uncommon in the trailer world, especially with a name like "quality".

    i have no expectations that it's a professional commercial duty trailer...i wouldn't even know what that brand would be...but it's a hell of a lot better than the various trailers i've had thus far in my life....so it's an improvement for me. and it's not a rental, so when i got home from ohio today i was able to back in and walk away, instead of unloading instantly to try to get it back before i got charged another $50.

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  20. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    I have justification for my actions. I commented on it, because of the junk I see, the designs I have made, and the few trailers I have built or worked on.

    I don't like it, but want to keep the record straight, there are garbage trailers out there. Tell me how the OP is supposed to add "D" rings to that trailer with no rub rail, and only 3" channel underneath the wood ?

    Too many people buy on price alone.
    I'll agree, that there are some shit trailers out there. I may have one. I know I've had many before...and I've done all kinds of repairs as well to trailers that were garbage.

    I'm not exactly putting an excavator on this. I doubt my 10,000 lb trailer will ever see more than 5,000 lbs.

    With that said, can we explain what proper rub rails would look like on a fender trailer? Maybe a picture of one? All I have now are stake pockets...so yes, probably a piece of shit. The trailer ate three garbage straps today because they rubbed on the sharp corner of the frame channel. I know the way I can see doing it in my head, but I'm NOT experienced in hauling properly. I've always winged it with what I had when it came to hauling my tools.

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  22. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by gbent View Post
    Do yourself a favor and buy a can of anti-seize. Copper or nickel doesn't matter, either will work. It lasts much better than oil, especially in the rust prone environment of southern Michigan.
    Good idea. I never thought of that and I have a can of anti seize already but I'm pretty sure that the new lugnuts will keep the water out. As an added bonus the anti seize wouldn't be as likely to get all over the wheels from centrifugal force.

  23. #36
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    I have several goosenecks the best thing I ever did was rewire them through pipe, separate wiring for everything. and a wiring diagram inside the electrical panel. I can rewire it front to rear in 2 hours I also stuck a fuse panel in it so that when something goes wrong I can figure out which circuit it is. trailer wiring has always been my nemesis. I figure if nothing goes wrong I have to do it every 5 years. last time the grass under the trailer caught fire from welding, melted all the brake wiring out.
    as for brands they all cut corners somewhere. otherwise they can't hit the price points of the competition. I purchased a one off, custom built trailer that had been in a wreck and put a new neck on it out of 4x8 .250 tubing that is my best, stiffest, trailer.also one of the heaviest.

  24. #37
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    a mini lugger system is a dream i have had for years
    2 cylinders and a very little bit of iron and you're a one man lathe loader no forklift required
    set a bridgy in the driveway, okey dokey
    haul a pile of scrap engines to the dump, no problemo

    ace-lugger-trailer-rear.jpg

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  26. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fish On View Post
    Only really usable for strapping straight over the top of something, not for angled pulls. Pretty decent for strapping stacks of lumber, not so much for a top heavy machine tools.
    You can still position those strap diagonally to a degree. When I recently moved my Abene mill with a stakebed , some of the ratchet straps were not straight across, but curved around the machine base casting.

  27. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spud View Post
    What about these? No fussing about with strap storage when not in use. No need to secure both end of the straps.

    24/7 uv damage

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  29. #40
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    I don't get why they weld those on. The hook end can hook anywhere along the 'hook rail', why not make the winch end (shown) with a hook as well, so they can be slid along the rail anywhere, as well as taken off and stored out of the weather and sunlight?

    Quote Originally Posted by Fish On View Post
    Only really usable for strapping straight over the top of something, not for angled pulls. Pretty decent for strapping stacks of lumber, not so much for a top heavy machine tools.

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