Positioning forklift to work underneath, jack up ends of forks ok?
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  1. #1
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    Default Positioning forklift to work underneath, jack up ends of forks ok?

    Need to adjust parking brake on Cat truck pictured, weighs 13,000 lbs. Manual has good step-by-step with photos for brake adjustment, but one small detail isn’t mentioned, namely fact that all doodads to be removed, tweaked, replaced are only accessible from underneath truck. I’m sure the Cat folks just drove over a pit to get the pix but our landlord would be hesitant regarding me constructing such a pit in his floor, I suspect. So I plan to lift front of truck somehow and set front wheels on solid blocks after rear wheels securely chocked, all on level surface of course. Lifting whole truck level would give better access but much harder for us to do, so plan is to lift front only.

    My question: Since it would be much easier to lift front by raising end of forks with smaller forklift (6000 lb cap.) I’d like to do that if it won’t damage forks or mast on Cat. This lift point shown as “B” in pic. See, what I don’t know is whether fork connection to mast and mast connection to truck are both designed so that forces applied in direction opposite to those for which they were designed, are acceptable.

    Method “A” (much harder to do) uses pair of cable reel jacks astride load, lifting 2.5” solid steel shaft chained on both sides to the square lifting eyes, max 10” lift before blocking, re-rigging needed.

    Method “C” would involve setting very strong machine bases on lower side of loading dock and driving Cat off dock a few feet so each wheel supported by separate machinery foundation. This would probably be the easiest and give by far the best access but is obviously a bit scary if only due to the large amount of potential energy involved, and thus I’ve been scared away from it.

    So, ok to lift ends of these 6’ forks, or not? Also if you’ve had occasion to elevate a heavy vehicle to work under it, how did you do it?

    75ab23c2-77cd-43df-af9e-57004bd8cdc7.jpg
    Last edited by Cannonmn; 03-02-2018 at 06:00 AM. Reason: Fix, add

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    No, do not lift from your point B. Instead, lean mast back, put cribbing under mast near your point A by leaning mast in, block under mast, and lean mast out, which will lift wheels. Repeat as needed, but not much space will be needed. Remember, you have to reverse these steps as many as it took to lift it when you are ready to go down.

    DO NOT HURRY

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    Doubt that would be a safe thing to do as tynes are designed for lifting not being pushed the other way.

    Think of another method that you feel is safe and or ask the experts who work on forklifts being a better option i would think how they do what they do by what method and copy that method.

    Sometimes its best to choose the safe proven method for your own health.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Red James View Post
    No, do not lift from your point B. Instead, lean mast back, put cribbing under mast near your point A by leaning mast in, block under mast, and lean mast out, which will lift wheels. Repeat as needed, but not much space will be needed. Remember, you have to reverse these steps as many as it took to lift it when you are ready to go down.

    DO NOT HURRY
    This is exactly how I did the brakes and tires on my Hyster 8000 pound lift.....

    Kevin

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    As Red said.

    There is no down force on the forks, so you can lift the forks all you wish without lifting any more than the fork carriage. Worst case is the fork carriage yaw locks and raises the forklift somewhat until it comes crashing down.

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    Or just go to the lumber yard and get a couple boards as needed and cut the ends at an angle to make drive on blocks.

    Simple safe and easy.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337Z using Tapatalk

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    On many fork lifts you remove the forks by lifting the end and then uncouple the top mount, what you're proposing might lift the mast but not the truck.
    Dan

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    why not just a bottle jack under the the machine just like you would any other heavy vehicle may need a low profile jack to start with then crib the tires with wood blocks? thats how I work on mine. or 2 floor jacks if you have them one on each side harbor freight has 3 ton floor jacks for a little over a 100 apiece make sure its cribbed and your good. I had a 12x12 timber cut into ramps 5' long and that is not a method for me it gets wobbly driving up them

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    Did you try to lift it with the other forklift you have?

    I lift my forklifts with my forklifts. If you have two it makes it simple. Even a 2500lb forklift will lift one end of a 13k lb lift if you do it right. My 5k Hyster will lift atleast 20K lbs right at the mast.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Red James View Post
    No, do not lift from your point B. Instead, lean mast back, put cribbing under mast near your point A by leaning mast in, block under mast, and lean mast out, which will lift wheels. Repeat as needed, but not much space will be needed. Remember, you have to reverse these steps as many as it took to lift it when you are ready to go down.

    DO NOT HURRY
    This is the proper procedure. All you’ll do is raise the forks off the ground if you try to lift under the forks. There is nothing holding the forks but a set of chains.

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    It's got those lifting lugs for a reason. At work I've lifted a small forklift with an overhead crane to work on the brakes.

    Don't lift by the end of the forks, forklifts weight more than what they can lift and why would you add that floppy attachment point into your rigging.

    Or stubby jacks/cylinders to lift it from the bottom.

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    I have done this in the past, I drive up wooden ramps, then use the mast to go up to put solid blocks under the tires after taking out the wood ramps. I used I think 12" sch 120 pipe for the tires. Rock solid and 1 piece so no chance of it falling and it locks the lift from rolling. This was a hard tire lift.

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    A somewhat-cowboy approach to lifting low, heavy things with light-duty forklifts is to raise the forks a bit, tilt forward all the way, then put forks just above floor. Move in to the load, using forks as a powered wedge; no lift cylinder use at all. Slight additional lift can be had by tilting back a bit. Load tilts up on front edge while back remains on floor, allowing blocking, etc. as needed. Note that load may/will move back as you advance, and possibly not equal amounts on each end, if you're not centered on the weight. So it's not without its challenges.

    Plus, you didn't hear this from me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bondo View Post
    I have done this in the past, I drive up wooden ramps, then use the mast to go up to put solid blocks under the tires after taking out the wood ramps. I used I think 12" sch 120 pipe for the tires. Rock solid and 1 piece so no chance of it falling and it locks the lift from rolling. This was a hard tire lift.

    Sent from my 2PS64 using Tapatalk
    Thanks, maybe I took some stupid pills today by accident but I’m having trouble understanding this method. I think you lost me at the top of the wooden ramp.

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    Here’s a video of raising a bit using mast tilt as described above by a few posts. Dialogue in Spanish I think, but pictures are understandable as is. Carretillas elevadoras: sustitucion de ruedas tractoras - YouTube

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    There are forklift jacks. This one is Vestil. i have a lincoln and use it for machinery more than forklifts.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Cannonmn View Post
    Thanks, maybe I took some stupid pills today by accident but I’m having trouble understanding this method. I think you lost me at the top of the wooden ramp.
    Drive up wooden ramps then do as Red James said in post #2. It's that method just starts at 8" tall.

    And what I mean by wooden ramps is a 8x8 cut to a ramp, not some 2x4 stacked

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mud View Post
    There are forklift jacks. This one is Vestil. i have a lincoln and use it for machinery more than forklifts.

    Thanks, looks affordable, $329. On sale now plus ship. I guess. https://www.northerntool.com/shop/to...xoCvssQAvD_BwE

    I have an 8000 lb cap. Electric. Pallet jack that has same lift cap. But not as high, would have to do in increments after I figured out how to position that machine’s legs to take about equal load.


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