Rigging a 6' Niagara Mechanical Shear
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  1. #1
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    Default Rigging a 6' Niagara Mechanical Shear

    I'm planning to look at a 6' 14ga Niagara Mechanical Shear. The internet gives approx weights of 3,500-4,000 lbs. The seller has a large backhoe on site that he will probably use to pick and place the shear onto a tiltdeck trailer.

    What is the best way to pick and place the shear? Slings at each end, or what?

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    Yes, slings at each end is correct.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fish On View Post
    Yes, slings at each end is correct.
    That's what I'd do.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk

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    I found this Niagara 10-72 shear

    10Ga Cap. 72 Width Niagara 1R6-10 SHEAR, Front Operated Power Back Gauge, ID#18837, make Niagara, model 1R6-10 for sale - and other used Niagara 1R6-10, new Niagara 1R6-10, surplus Niagara 1R6-10: Power Squaring Shears (Gauges)

    The place to pick it up from overhead is definitely in the end-bolsters. Not sure if they have tapped holes in the castings. As always a swivel lifting ring is highly preferred over a generic eyebolt if you have to triangulate and pick from a single lift point.

    That said "sling physics vector math" always applies and you want the slings as vertical as possible to a) not overload them in tension and b) to not crush the part being picked up via the horizontal forces (that last one probably doesn't apply with a heavy cast structure, more for things like electrical panels).


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