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  1. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldwrench View Post
    Wonder how they were able to rationalize all that arc welding...
    "The sin is in the deed, not the result."

    We've sold "amish" machinery before. I think it depends on the community, but in general they don't care how someone else makes something, just as long as they can use it according to their standards.

  2. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldwrench View Post
    Wonder how they were able to rationalize all that arc welding...
    Not a problem here as long as it's an engine driven welder.
    I don't understand the use of air, hydraulics is big with the Amish here.

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  4. #83
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    The Amish here are using wi-fi and cell phones, as long as the tool or devise is not tied to the grid they are OK with it. Hydraulics are fine, they all drive tractors so I don't see why driving a forklift is an issue?

    Steve

  5. #84
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    Steve,

    Those Amish driving tractors are certainly in Kansas..are the Amish in Woodland Hills driving Tesla's?

    Stuart

  6. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by atomarc View Post
    Steve,

    Those Amish driving tractors are certainly in Kansas..are the Amish in Woodland Hills driving Tesla's?

    Stuart
    Probably, there are actually a couple of Model S Tesla's in Hutch, along with several Prius go figure?

    Steve

  7. #86
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    This my newly purchased lift. It's a 2002 Toyota 7FGU30, with a FSV mast, 9300 hrs, solid cushion tires, dual fuel gas/LPG, 5600 lb lift per data plate.

    It's got a bit of rust and corrosion going on and won't run on propane but runs and starts very good on gas. It's the best I've found in several years worth of looking so despite the corrosion issues I bought it.

    I think the first repair task is to replace the chains as they are pretty well hosed. Then get it to run on propane.

    So my first question. Are there any tricks or things to watch for when replacing the chains? I have a gantry crane to lift the mast slightly to relieve pressure on the chains. Then it should be a matter of measuring the length of exposed threads on adjusting bolts so the new chains can go back close to proper adjustment. Remove the old chains and install the new ones.

    I'm sure the Toyota dealer is going to want an arm and a leg for chains so is there another option? Thanks in advance






    Last edited by nc5a; 06-09-2019 at 03:59 PM. Reason: clarity

  8. #87
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    That looks like roller chain, match it up and buy it from a chain supplier. As far as installation, a 4x4 under the carriage is all you need to slack the chains. Put the new chain on and adjust so the level when it is on the ground, that is the crux of it. Are the sprockets in good shape?

    Looking at the chain again it looks like leaf chain, same thing chain supplier should have that.

    See starting page 115 http://tsubaki.ca/pdf/library/Revise...in-Catalog.pdf

    Steve

  9. #88
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    here's mine lifting a piece of iron

    img_2575.jpg

    img_2573.jpg

    sorry about the orientation. i assure you those pics are right side up on my mac
    Last edited by lectrician1; 06-09-2019 at 04:45 PM. Reason: try to change pic orientation

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    Steve,

    Thanks for the link to the chain catalog. Also, never considered putting a 4 X 4 under the carriage. Thanks

    Ron

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    Quote Originally Posted by nc5a View Post
    This my newly purchased lift. It's a 2002 Toyota 7FGU30, with a FSV mast, 9300 hrs, solid cushion tires, dual fuel gas/LPG, 5600 lb lift per data plate.

    It's got a bit of rust and corrosion going on and won't run on propane but runs and starts very good on gas. It's the best I've found in several years worth of looking so despite the corrosion issues I bought it.

    I think the first repair task is to replace the chains as they are pretty well hosed. Then get it to run on propane.
    I JUST got thru searching for chain- converting counterweights on some big vertical lathes we are rebuilding from rollerchain to something heavier, BL646 (6x4 pattern leaf chain, yours looks like smaller 2x3?) chain from local shop was 24 bucks a foot, Intella has it for 10... looking thru their stuff, appears to be a good source for inexpensive parts

    Forklift Parts at Low Prices with FAST shipping | Intella Liftparts

  12. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by lectrician1 View Post
    here's mine lifting a piece of iron

    img_2575.jpg

    img_2573.jpg

    sorry about the orientation. i assure you those pics are right side up on my mac
    first lathe I ever ran was a monarch EE...sweet little lathes. the flex shaft for the variable speed was always a issue,other than that, it was a awesome little lathe

  13. #92
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    I knew I liked this website, but never realized it was because of the forklift porn......

  14. #93
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    Here is my favorite.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  15. #94
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    One of mine....Note the 3" steel plate affixed to the counterweight. Nominal 8,000 lb capacity truck lifting 9,500 lb turning center.

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  17. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by nc5a View Post
    ...So my first question. Are there any tricks or things to watch for when replacing the chains? I have a gantry crane to lift the mast slightly to relieve pressure on the chains. Then it should be a matter of measuring the length of exposed threads on adjusting bolts so the new chains can go back close to proper adjustment. Remove the old chains and install the new ones.
    Those chains are pretty crusty.

    You shouldn't need the forks in the air when you replace the chains- they should be plenty long enough to reach the ground.

    The old chain is stretched, the adjustment will be different on new chains so the amount of threads on the old adjusters is irrelevant.

    Lay down a piece of 3/4" plywood under the forks, and use a carpenter's level to tilt the mast to vertical. Put the new chains on, take up the slack on each chain by hand, then give another turn on each adjusting nut.

    You want even loading on each chain- a tension gage helps. You want the forks about 1/2" off the floor when the mast is vertical and the forks are all the way down. This helps to keep people from dragging the heel of the forks on the concrete, which can grind the forks down over time and weaken them.

  18. #96
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    tc429,

    Thanks for the link to Intella Lift parts it will certainly save me a few bucks. Have a good day.
    Ron

  19. #97
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    jancollc,

    Thanks for the valuable repair tip. I would have never considered setting up and adjusting so the heel doesn't drag on the concrete, thanks. I will try to provide photos of the repair process. Thanks again.

    Ron

  20. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milacron View Post


    One of mine....Note the 3" steel plate affixed to the counterweight. Nominal 8,000 lb capacity truck lifting 9,500 lb turning center.
    Why is it lifted so high?

  21. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by nc5a View Post
    This my newly purchased lift. It's a 2002 Toyota 7FGU30, with a FSV mast, 9300 hrs, solid cushion tires, dual fuel gas/LPG, 5600 lb lift per data plate.

    It's got a bit of rust and corrosion going on and won't run on propane but runs and starts very good on gas. It's the best I've found in several years worth of looking so despite the corrosion issues I bought it.

    I think the first repair task is to replace the chains as they are pretty well hosed. Then get it to run on propane.

    So my first question. Are there any tricks or things to watch for when replacing the chains? I have a gantry crane to lift the mast slightly to relieve pressure on the chains. Then it should be a matter of measuring the length of exposed threads on adjusting bolts so the new chains can go back close to proper adjustment. Remove the old chains and install the new ones.

    I'm sure the Toyota dealer is going to want an arm and a leg for chains so is there another option? Thanks in advance






    Industry term for lift chains is leaf chain. Many manufacturers to choose from, your dealer doesn’t go to Toyota for theirs. Might not be on anyone’s (non forklift dealer) shelf in AK but it will be in Seattle area.

    Match leaf pattern, 2+2 I think they call yours, and pitch, count pitches on one, double it +1 or 2, and cut it yourself.

  22. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve in SoCal View Post
    The Amish here are using wi-fi and cell phones, as long as the tool or devise is not tied to the grid they are OK with it. Hydraulics are fine, they all drive tractors so I don't see why driving a forklift is an issue?

    Steve
    Seems every community is different. I've been told the local elders set the rules for any given community.

    We did some machinery moving for a local group awhile back. It was a old looking cabinet shop. In the front of the building looked just like a walk back in time and there was even a spot where you could watch Amish craftsmen hand building cabinets. What they didn't show was the brand new CNC router that we put in a back room hidden from view. Looked like there may be a little deception going on.


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