Starting or deep cycle 12v battery for shop equipment?
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  1. #1
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    Default Starting or deep cycle 12v battery for shop equipment?

    We have a number of 12v electrohydraulic machines we don’t use too often, say only a couple of 10-min. Sessions a week. These include a straddle stacker, a man lift, a die lifter, a tipper, and probably some others I forgot. I took dead batteries out of two of them recently and noticed the tipper had a deep cycle marine battery but the die lifter had an ordinary car battery. Deep cycle batteries tend to be more expensive. Is there any particular advantage to those? My priorities are batteries that don’t need much maintenance and batteries that will last longer when pretty much neglected. IF there’s any difference. I normally get batteries at Costco.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cannonmn View Post
    My priorities are batteries that don’t need much maintenance and batteries that will last longer when pretty much neglected. IF there’s any difference. I normally get batteries at Costco.
    Get the deep cycle batts, they still need maintenance though.

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    I bought deep cycle batteries for a while to run a hydraulic pump and a winch occasionally. I found that they all lasted just about 2 years each. I switched to a standard Group 24 car battery because they also fit other vehicles that I had. Those last about 4 years each. I don't get how deep cycle batteries are better.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mud View Post
    I bought deep cycle batteries for a while to run a hydraulic pump and a winch occasionally. I found that they all lasted just about 2 years each. I switched to a standard Group 24 car battery because they also fit other vehicles that I had. Those last about 4 years each. I don't get how deep cycle batteries are better.
    Were you trickle charging them after use? If you drain them all the way it really kills the life of the battery.

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    Deep cycle batteries are supposed to have thicker plates and other differences that allow them to tolerate deep discharges better. Also, deep cycle batteries are designed to provide a lower amperage over a longer time, vs starting battery with high amp output over a short time (as in starting).

    If you don't run something much as to not discharge it and keep it maintained and charged when not in use, you'll probably get good service out of a starting battery. If it's something you run a bunch and greatly discharge the battery regularly, a starting battery won't last long.

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    In your application, use a normal car battery and a motorcycle battery tender for each battery. The battery tenders continually monitor the charge level and trickle charge only when necessary. They are inexpensive today and they work on any size battery. They extend the life of even very large batteries over many years. I keep one on my diesel forklift, which is kept outside in the weather year around.

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    First get good quality battery and current norm seems to be maybe 7 years with first 3 as direct exchange with prorated after.

    Costco sams and auto zone are good sources.

    Next get battery tender or battery minder or you can go to Ebay and get one of the new led power supplies and look for one that has 2 terminals each for positive and negative as they are feed back regulated meaning you rub 4 wires to load with 2 supplying power then 2 supply feedback to supply.

    You adjust for 13.5 and the supply compensates for loads and losses.

    Properly done with the 7 year battery you will get 7 years...

    What is load and duty cycle?

    Lots of other things needed to properly engineer it but the above is a good generic start.

    Enersys makes a pure lead battery that sears also sells which is really good but costs 2 X but only adds 1 year.

    Commercial VRLA also options but added costs.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337Z using Tapatalk

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    Maybe equip your machines with plugs, move the battery, and every night
    hook it a trickle charger.

    On a couple of the things you listed, I could see the battery on a hand truck
    (with the tender hooked on all the time) roll it up to the machine,
    plug in the battery with the large plug (check ebay, I got some very cheaply).

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