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  1. #21
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    Just a note, Adama wrote of air bag suspensions.

    When I was getting dump truck loads of fill, the airbag equipped trucks always dumped all the
    air first before raising the bed.

    They said they let the suspension down onto the hard rubber blocks for stability.

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    The photos remind me of an engine changer in a race car trailer except that engine changers don't usually slide fore and aft.. Mine is in a Goldrush trailer, it consist of an aluminum beam that extends out the side door to lift and transport an engine. The beam is stowed in the upper right corner of the trailer, it's connected to a rail on the right side by a swiveling trolley so one man can slide it forward and rotate it out the door, then pin the end into a socket on the left wall of the trailer. Most loads are ~500 lbs or so, I'd guess it could lift 1000 lbs safely. I can't find a photo of one online. There's no load rating that I remember, but maybe a race car trailer manufacturer near you could offer some design information? My trailer is all aluminum construction, it's built around extrusions like a Fruehauf truck trailer and the trolley rail is built into the trailer wall and spreads the load out pretty well. Trailer is a 43' long gooseneck, weighs ~8000 lbs empty and handles the cantlievered load easily.

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  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    How is a free swinging jib crane going to be any more controllable than a gantry ?
    It doesn't have to be free-swinging. You can have a simple brake in the base of the pillar with a series of holes drilled through both sides of the pillar in a sort of spiral staircase progression: insert a heavy crow bar and swing it around, apply the brake, reset the bar...

    Does give you the flexibility to put the load almost anywhere in the box rather than just on the center line.

    Or, bring the load up close the pillar and you could probably swing it just by grabbing the end of the boom. Lock where you want it then pull or wind the trolley and load out to the appropriate point on the boom and lower away.

    Being able to vary the angle of the boom with a screw or hydraulic jack would maybe make the screw controlled trolley idea unnecessary: you just level the boom with the jack and slide the trolley and load by hand? Good to have a brake on the trolley though.

    I guess if you wanted to get clever you could have a spring-loaded, cable-actuated brake that notched into a ring on the top of the pillar socket and have the brake handle at the end of the boom, for one man operation.

    (That set up in the photo is not going to last: those little fairleads are not built to handle the entire weight of the load the winch can lift. There's going to be a bang-crash there one day.

    On the other hand, not sure if any of us noticed the two I beams running the opposite direction that the whole contraption is hanging from, or the HSS angle brace? Good effort if you can stop it sliding around when you don't want it to.)

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  6. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rivett View Post
    It doesn't have to be free-swinging. You can have a simple brake in the base of the pillar with a series of holes drilled through both sides of the pillar in a sort of spiral staircase progression: insert a heavy crow bar and swing it around, apply the brake, reset the bar...

    Does give you the flexibility to put the load almost anywhere in the box rather than just on the center line.

    Or, bring the load up close the pillar and you could probably swing it just by grabbing the end of the boom. Lock where you want it then pull or wind the trolley and load out to the appropriate point on the boom and lower away.

    Being able to vary the angle of the boom with a screw or hydraulic jack would maybe make the screw controlled trolley idea unnecessary: you just level the boom with the jack and slide the trolley and load by hand? Good to have a brake on the trolley though.

    I guess if you wanted to get clever you could have a spring-loaded, cable-actuated brake that notched into a ring on the top of the pillar socket and have the brake handle at the end of the boom, for one man operation.

    (That set up in the photo is not going to last: those little fairleads are not built to handle the entire weight of the load the winch can lift. There's going to be a bang-crash there one day.

    On the other hand, not sure if any of us noticed the two I beams running the opposite direction that the whole contraption is hanging from, or the HSS angle brace? Good effort if you can stop it sliding around when you don't want it to.)
    How do you move the load and work the brake ?

    FWIW I have used several jib cranes over the years, and the powered rotation
    ones blow for ease of usage.

    First off, the swinging jib is limited in it's coverage inside and outside of the trailer (severely) and secondly, it applies a very concentrated load into
    the trailer structure, not so much with the 4 post's of a gantry (heck, it will
    help reinforce the roof)

    And you want to somehow level this trailer every time, so when you release this brake, it won't take off ?

    And where do you purchase a brake ? or going to "Harry Homeshop" this too ?
    Maybe devote 6 issues of The Homeshop Machinist bedside reader" to building it,
    much like the Lawn edger fiasco.

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    When you spend 1/2 a day trying to load a machine,you see the value in a Palfinger or Hiab......anyhoo,the sliding gantry out the back idea is very old,but with a prop for the outer end of the beam, it can lift 5 ton using a chainblock.There are plenty of pictures of WW2 GMC 6x6 mobile workshop trucks with such gantrys,and the British used the same idea in heavy trucks for towing....Also check out the Holmes Wrecker gear,5 ton lift ,no swing controll built in......you simply attach rigging to limit swing,or move the load.

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    I've considered building/modifying a trailer so it can self load heavy stuff, but for the most part have found that in most applications where a forklift is not available, a tow truck is. Pay the man, back trailer under machine, set it, strap it, and done.

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    How do you move the load and work the brake ?

    FWIW I have used several jib cranes over the years, and the powered rotation
    ones blow for ease of usage.

    First off, the swinging jib is limited in it's coverage inside and outside of the trailer (severely) and secondly, it applies a very concentrated load into
    the trailer structure, not so much with the 4 post's of a gantry (heck, it will
    help reinforce the roof)

    And you want to somehow level this trailer every time, so when you release this brake, it won't take off ?

    And where do you purchase a brake ? or going to "Harry Homeshop" this too ?
    Maybe devote 6 issues of The Homeshop Machinist bedside reader" to building it,
    much like the Lawn edger fiasco.
    You're right that for personal use you can make what you want, but for commercial it's got to be factory made, or maybe certified by your insuror - not that an insurer today would ever do such a thing.

    "Move the load and work the brake" in what situation? Why do more than one at a time? You mean slide the trolley along the beam and rotate the pillar and beam at the same time? It would depend on the load, the angle of the beam, your personal strength, whether you used a lever and how long it was...all kinds of things, or so it seems to me anyway.

    If the beam can be adjusted for angle via a jack or screw you can always keep it pretty level. It may need several adjustments as you swing the boom through its axis, but nothing's perfect.

    For a brake you could use a steel disk about 1/2" thick with a series of holes around the edge attached to the baseplate, and a spring loaded pin attached to the pillar that would engage with them. A cable via pulleys from the end of the pin to the end of the boom would easy to rig up. You could just have a D handle or a lever if you wanted.

    I agree that a four post gantry system would put the least load on the trailer or truck box structure. But how do you adjust for angle or control the movement of the beam trolley?

    Less weight in the swinging boom and you could always attach a jack to that corner to carry the load down the ground.

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    You quickly get experience when moving heavy weights with makeshift tackle.....my old man was an "expert" in dangerous deeds.....how there were no deaths or serious injuries ,I dont know......but we kids moved pretty quick in those days...

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    Your winch is a no no. Never heard of a flat strap used as a hoist line and I've been a certified rigger for years. And agreed, the fairlead might fail on the first lift.

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    I have seen flatbed trucks with single i-beam*extending out past the tail. held up by two hoops one in front and one in back. Used to carry big concrete blocks to test scales and to move safes.
    Bil lD.

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    I had to share this youtube video I stumbled across. I still have not given up on this idea, but it's changed a bit since I first thought about it. I still want to make a self loading non-tilt type trailer, just different from originally planned.

    https://youtu.be/odEcP28EMNE

    Sent from my S61 using Tapatalk

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    I sold my land to a car salvager .....the entire operation use seatbelts as fabric rigging straps ...but they are only lifting car bodies ,max weight 1 1/2 ton ........I have a very large collection of the fabric loops with tears in the jacket.....doesnt affect the lifting capacity until the silver thread comes out in a meaningful way.

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    Years ago,BP hit the sandblasters with a safety inspection,with the focus on lifting gear.....each item used was dragged out.....and whats this ?....tow line.....torn and knotted strap...tow line ......wire rope with knot in it ...tow line....Do you have anything thats not a tow line?.....Ah...No.

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    I think a person would do very well to have the monorail in 2 sections with an external outboard support that's site-assembled.

    So part of the monorail exists permanently inside the trailer. 2 people would align the outboard section to the inner, attach, and then set an exterior A-frame for support and for leveling.

    Questions exist about capacity, but I'm thinking ~4000 lbs WLL is within the range of an S4 x 7.7 or an S6 x 12.5# I-beam where an additional 10' is manageable by 2 people.

    Any kind of cantilever-only structure is going to be severely limited in reach and capacity. Thus the idea to double-support and do some site-assembly.

    Definitely in an enclosed trailer there's also a need for a vast array of tie-down points (steel loops, rings, etc) which are attached to the under-structure so the machine can be tied for transport.

    If I were building one I'd try to use an existing enclosure and build the hoist system within.

    The youtube link is a good one although lacking in the enclosure. This is a design offshoot of that more inline with the septic-tank truck.

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    I dunno if you have the Marel bin type lifters in the US,but IMHO ,this would be the kind of lifter I would make for moving machines......the commercial lifters will handle 12 ton ,mounted on a 3 axle truck,and around 7 ton on a 2 axle chassis.....A mini one would be fairly easy to make for 2 to 3 ton lift.

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  20. #36
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    Is this what you meant, John? I've seen a couple of videos of a guy who has a sawmill and goes around with a heavy duty trailer he's whipped up that is equipped with a hoisting system just like this truck and he uses it to pick up great big logs to haul home to cut on his bandsaw. Works pretty good. If you were hauling machinery for a living, making something like a heavy duty skid capable of being picked up by this type of machine, you could load machinery on the skid and tie it down as needed, back the truck/trailer up to the machine, attach chains, then lift it up and back on to trailer. Would be pretty slick.




    2-vert.jpg

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    At first I thought you were talking about the trucks I see around here that install grease traps and septic tanks. Just needs to be enclosed.


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    Starting with the truck pictured, one could also build the box with a slot in the roof and removable roof panel(s). It sounds like a pain to get them all sealed up so it doesn't leak like mad going down the road, and it would compromise the rear door to likely be flat panels instead of the typical rolling door.

    I think the box would also need some removable inner structural crossbars, if you picture trying to keep a 3 sided "corner" rigid and roadworthy it can surely be done but at the expense of a lot of heavy steel framework.

    It appears that truck also has a power traverse which would be absolutely necessary for that kind of weight, as soon as the load got rearward of the tires it would start deflecting down and a free rolling trolley would rapidly accelerate into the end-stop. Similar concept would apply if the overhead rail (and truck) were pointed slightly downhill. For that reason it would be useful to have an endless roller chain or steel cable loop with both ends attached to the trolley (same concept as a garage door opener) so the horizontal motion can be managed thru all sorts of leveling scenarios.

    One would want to be able to either remove the chainfall or at least have a water-resistant bird-house to store it inside...

    Lots of design considerations here no matter which way the project goes. I feel like investing in some heavy duty equipment tarps and using classic forklifting devices are going to be simpler and cheaper in the long run.

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    The Palfinger /Hiab truck cranes are popular for a reason.....deliveries of the large concrete tanks here are all done with the aforementioned truck cranes .

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    What I think makes more sense than the truck with the I-beam trolley set up for concrete tank delivery is what many lumber delivery companies use. That is the rough terrain three wheel fork lift that plugs its forks into the back of the truck/trailer and then lifts itself off the ground. Much more maneuverable for loading/unloading and does not need a special use truck.

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