Transporting my Autometric
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 21
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Brookfield, Wisconsin
    Posts
    4,372
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    312
    Likes (Received)
    468

    Default Transporting my Autometric

    Picked this up yesterday. Was 270 miles from home. Rented an F550 from Enterprise.


    I overdo it with securing a machine, so made the custom skid, screwed down blocking all around the machine, and used four 3,350lbs load rated straps (breakout force 10,000lbs). Blocked the bottom of the head with a piece of lumber.

    Machine has a small footprint but weighs around 5,000 lbs.

    Only got about 12mpg on my outbound trip, going at 60-64 mph. Return trip I was doing about 70 mph (speed limit) and got about 11mpg.















  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    1,174
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    224
    Likes (Received)
    332

    Default

    Congratulations on your purchase of perhaps the most useful toolroom machine in existence. I would strongly recommend to tool-up this tool for your own needs.

  3. Likes Spud, sandiapaul liked this post
  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Brookfield, Wisconsin
    Posts
    4,372
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    312
    Likes (Received)
    468

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by otrlt View Post
    Congratulations on your purchase of perhaps the most useful toolroom machine in existence. I would strongly recommend to tool-up this tool for your own needs.

    Looking at RKepler's past thread on a similar machine, tooling seems hard to get hold of. So I will have to make my own when I eventually get a place to set up all my machines.

  5. Likes Kjelle liked this post
  6. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    8,609
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    603
    Likes (Received)
    4339

    Default

    Is the spindle nose 40 Flash Change? If so, its not hard to find.

  7. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Brookfield, Wisconsin
    Posts
    4,372
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    312
    Likes (Received)
    468

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gbent View Post
    Is the spindle nose 40 Flash Change? If so, its not hard to find.

    Russ (RKepler) says it is the old 40 NST, and he has adapted a 40 NMTB tool holder. When I eventually get my own shop, I will work on making tooling for this. Been wanting my own shop / garage space for many years, no idea when I will finally be able to.

  8. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Oklahoma City, OK
    Posts
    5,528
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1068
    Likes (Received)
    2410

    Default

    I am so freaking jealous of you! I've wanted an Autometric since KPoter posted his years ago!

  9. Likes Joe Miranda liked this post
  10. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Brookfield, Wisconsin
    Posts
    4,372
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    312
    Likes (Received)
    468

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cole2534 View Post
    I am so freaking jealous of you! I've wanted an Autometric since KPoter posted his years ago!

    I became aware of them many years ago, when Milacron or someone made a thread about small HBMs. I thought they looked soo neat. And having a weakness for neat mechanical things I always thought if I ever saw one in my neck of the woods I would see if I could afford one. I never looked out for these for many years afterwards by just on a whim, a month ago, I decided to see if any were around near me and was surprised to see one.

    I didn't get it because I have a use for it , and no idea what I can use it for, I just got it because it is soo freaking neat. Other than it's accuracy , what makes it near is its small size for an HBM, and that built in rotary table. The handwheel has a mechanical digital counter built in, which I have not seen on other American machine tools.

  11. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    suburbs of Ann Arbor, MI, USA
    Posts
    13,203
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    456
    Likes (Received)
    1100

    Default

    I would suggest two things from your transport photos.

    1) buy some cordura sleeves for those 2" web straps to prevent chafing on sharp metal edges of the machine, I try to put 3 sleeves on each strap as a practice. I have bought them I believe from ebay and TruckNTow websites. Buy once and they are hanging around forevermore.

    2) put the flat hook inside of the rub rail and hook it under the edge of the actual truck bed. If you accidentally "rubbed" in the configuration shown you'd scrape all of the straps off at once and that would make for a bad day.

    Beautiful machine, incredible function that I can instantly see, now I want one lol

    I like that idea of renting a flatbed truck, I need to try that instead of pushing my ancient chevy truck on multistate missions.

  12. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Maryland
    Posts
    186
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    57

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by matt_isserstedt View Post
    I would suggest two things from your transport photos.

    1) buy some cordura sleeves for those 2" web straps to prevent chafing on sharp metal edges of the machine, I try to put 3 sleeves on each strap as a practice. I have bought them I believe from ebay and TruckNTow websites. Buy once and they are hanging around forevermore.
    I use pieces of old inner tubes.

  13. Likes matt_isserstedt liked this post
  14. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Oakland, CA
    Posts
    3,000
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    576
    Likes (Received)
    956

    Default

    Old fire hose is WAY better than inner tubes!!!! Also, awesome score on the machine!!!
    Last edited by Dan from Oakland; 07-15-2021 at 03:17 PM.

  15. Likes reggie_obe liked this post
  16. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Elyria Ohio
    Posts
    2,032
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4132
    Likes (Received)
    910

    Default

    That looks like a beauty! I have always wanted one of those too!

  17. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Brookfield, Wisconsin
    Posts
    4,372
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    312
    Likes (Received)
    468

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by matt_isserstedt View Post
    I would suggest two things from your transport photos.

    1) buy some cordura sleeves for those 2" web straps to prevent chafing on sharp metal edges of the machine, I try to put 3 sleeves on each strap as a practice. I have bought them I believe from ebay and TruckNTow websites. Buy once and they are hanging around forevermore.

    2) put the flat hook inside of the rub rail and hook it under the edge of the actual truck bed. If you accidentally "rubbed" in the configuration shown you'd scrape all of the straps off at once and that would make for a bad day.

    Beautiful machine, incredible function that I can instantly see, now I want one lol

    I like that idea of renting a flatbed truck, I need to try that instead of pushing my ancient chevy truck on multistate missions.

    I innitially put the flat hook inside of the rail but still hooked it to the rail's outer ledge. I changed it because the edge of the hook seemed like it was grabbing onto less of the rail when positioned inside the rail rather than outside the rail.

    Memory is a bit hazy but my recollection is that there was no ledge to hook into the actual bed of the truck. I moved my Abene and Rivett the same way.

    I always build a custom skid / pallet for the machines I move because I am concerned they may slide if I only used blocks, but I see lots of people transport machinery with just blocks between the machine and truck bed.

  18. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Brookfield, Wisconsin
    Posts
    4,372
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    312
    Likes (Received)
    468

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Miranda View Post
    That looks like a beauty! I have always wanted one of those too!
    It is a neat little thing, but I have no idea what I can use it for. I got it because HBMs are typically much larger, but this one is the exception. This one has that 'cute' and 'neat' factor because of its small size.

  19. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    1,174
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    224
    Likes (Received)
    332

    Default

    The shear beauty of this purchase is the fact that this tool was never in a production environment. This is a toolroom piece, only the highest skilled were allowed to even see it.

  20. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    6,125
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    6574
    Likes (Received)
    3459

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Spud View Post
    It is a neat little thing, but I have no idea what I can use it for. I got it because HBMs are typically much larger, but this one is the exception. This one has that 'cute' and 'neat' factor because of its small size.
    Is it considered an HBM? It strikes me as more of a horizontal jig borer.

    Looks like it would be great for a select size and style of parts.

  21. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Brookfield, Wisconsin
    Posts
    4,372
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    312
    Likes (Received)
    468

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by otrlt View Post
    The shear beauty of this purchase is the fact that this tool was never in a production environment. This is a toolroom piece, only the highest skilled were allowed to even see it.
    "only the highest skilled were allowed to even see it."

    Well that's not me then . I graduated from a CNC machine tool operator program from local Technical college past December. It was a 1 year full time program. First semester we ran manual and conversational machines. Second semester we ran CNC machines and surface grinders. I have no on the job expereince.

    Quote Originally Posted by Garwood View Post
    Is it considered an HBM? It strikes me as more of a horizontal jig borer.

    Looks like it would be great for a select size and style of parts.

    I was told in the Kearney & Trecker / Cinncinnati / US heavy iron sub-forum, that you can do some light milling on it. In addition to the drilling, boring, reaming.

  22. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    6,125
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    6574
    Likes (Received)
    3459

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Spud View Post
    "only the highest skilled were allowed to even see it."

    Well that's not me then . I graduated from a CNC machine tool operator program from local Technical college past December. It was a 1 year full time program. First semester we ran manual and conversational machines. Second semester we ran CNC machines and surface grinders. I have no on the job expereince.




    I was told in the Kearney & Trecker / Cinncinnati / US heavy iron sub-forum, that you can do some light milling on it. In addition to the drilling, boring, reaming.
    I am sure you can, just like any other Jig Borer.

    I think distinctions for HBM (Horizontal Boring Mill) are features that make boring operations straightforward, like a quill and a tailstock and enough substance that those bits can exist in reasonable alignment while also having enough room for the part you're working on. Over time, I think HBM's evolved to more of a "swiss Army Knife" of machine tools where they can justify the space they consume because they are versatile enough to replace other machines- Like large swing short bed lathes and radial drills.

    If that machine were built to accommodate a tailstock it would be about a foot longer. If it had a little baby quill, it would gain about the same amount in the other direction. If it had those features it wouldn't add much functionality to it.

  23. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Oakland, CA
    Posts
    403
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    199

    Default

    My grandfather actually worked at the Autometric factory scraping ways on those during the war. He was convinced that 90% of them went to the bottom of the Atlantic on Liberty ships as almost all of their production was sold through the Lend-Lease Act. His lasting contribution to Autometric was getting the shop foreman to install heavy curtains on the windows to prevent the afternoon sun from heating up the castings and distorting things while they were scraping.

    He also wasn't particularly fond of them even with a direct connection to their manufacturing...he always spoke reverently about the Pratt and Whitney flat belt lathe in the first shop he apprenticed.

  24. Likes Garwood liked this post
  25. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Oakland, CA
    Posts
    3,000
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    576
    Likes (Received)
    956

    Default

    TK- did your grandfather work for Autometric in Berkeley before it was sold to Kearney and Trecker? The (Model A) Autometrics had round ways on the Z axis.

  26. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    1,648
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    640
    Likes (Received)
    651

    Default

    Has anyone used both an Autometric and a Kearns S Type? Would be interested in their thoughts.

    L7


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •