What do you guys think of this quote for replacing tilt cylinder seals ? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    The tilt cylinders on a Hyster 8k are the easiest part on the whole lift to work on.......right there in front of you .......disconnect the mast pin,tilt the cylinder up,take out four bolts....pull the rod/piston out.....no hoses to disconnect,no oil spill....not much anyway....stick pin back in to hold rod,unscrew nut,on some rod is clamped on threaded rod end clevis.......replace all seals 1/2 hr,even if you re a beginner........Forklifts suck,Ive done hundreds,

  2. #22
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    even without travel time, seems high side of reasonable. But the amount of aspirin to work on a lift outcost the high side, making it completely reasonable. If you know of bad hoses, leaks, or even tires just have everything done?

  3. #23
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    If I were paying it, it sounds high, but If I were doing the job it sounds about right.

    You've got to figure at least 2 hours drive time just to get there and back. By the time the service tech drives there, spends a couple of hours or more to fix the cylinders, and then drives back, the day is pretty well spent. If you can't make around $800 (plus parts) or so a day for a service tech and a service truck, I'd say you'd go broke pretty quick.

    Service trucks are a necessary evil for dealers, and probably don't make much money on them. They had much rather you bring the parts or whole lift to their shop for repair, but understand that some customers can't or won't bring it in. Probably the best option for everybody would be to take the cylinders off and take them to the dealer shop for repair. By the time you've got them off though, I'd just go ahead and rebuild them myself. It's kind of messy, but tilt cylinders are real easy to deal with, much easier than a lift or steering cylinder.

  4. #24
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    A followup that the tech showed up today (obviously I was in no hurry) to replace the cylinder seals. Took him five hours...mostly because it took him "forever" to get the two backside clevis pins out. Seems like I was hearing dead blow hammer hits for an hour or more. But he finally got them free, replaced seals and all is well now.

    Temping to think thank goodness I didn't have to deal with the seized pins if nothing else....but I would have had the advantage of not needing penetrant spray to work "now".

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