What psi concrete is the typical warehouse / factory floor? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    My 8K boxcar special weighs 13K plus empty. 10K or 12K would be more. As note above several times whether it buckles is more about the subbase than anything else.

  2. #22
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    I had to drive over 4" concrete on packed dirt with a forklift that weighed 65k and a 17k machine on the forks. That concrete broke apart like driving over thin ice.

    You guys ever demolished concrete? 4" and under is pretty easy to break up and deal with. Pick up a 2000 lb steel bar on end with an excavator and just drop it from 8 feet. Or pick up the edge of a section, place something under the edge and drive up on it. 6" and thicker is much, much more difficult/involved. Rebar doesn't make much difference, but thickness sure does.

    I don't feel as though thicker sections are a waste of money. I always divide my pours up into 11 cu yard increments (usually 22 or 33 yards a day) and will add an inch or two to slab thickness if it makes sense to do so. If a section takes 9 yards why not spend another $240 to add a couple inches and use an entire 11 yard load?

  3. #23
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    I put 6" of 6 bag mix in my shop but I also dug it out 2'. packed pit run for 18" then topped it with road base and ran a packer until I was shaking in my sleep, had water running on it for a week. I have a few cracks but not much actual movement, it also had metal on 24" centers but I have point loaded it many times with outriggers and no cracking. my biggest issue and most damage has been spalling off when torch cutting in the shop. If your loads are normal you need a normal floor. 100,000 lbs on 4 midget forklift tires probably need more, that's where 1" steel road plates come into use. those are available for rent, the few times the weight is up in those numbers.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garwood View Post
    I also put 1-3 feet of 3" minus under the slab. Packed it with a diesel vibe roller for an entire day and then let it sit for a year before I finally poured.
    Spud?

    "See above". He got it right.

    Subgrade does all the REAL work.

    All the slab is for is to prevent disturbing it!

    Seriously. Fail that lesson, yer perpetually plucked.

    See "water bound Macadam" as the mother of all pavements:

    WATER BOUND MACADAM ROADS (W.B.M. Roads) - Engineering TiCh

    Egypt, then Rome were doing it before Macadam was born. Or even Roman-Law England.

    All he did was formalize the training for the revival.


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