What size trailer for my new 12000 lb yale cushion tire forklift.
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 22
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    363
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    161

    Default What size trailer for my new 12000 lb yale cushion tire forklift.

    Since my 7000 lb lift capacity yale has a bad engine, I have decided to buy a bigger 12,000 lb forklift while I'm replacing the engine in the smaller one, the 7,000 lb forklift weighs in at 12,000 lbs. and I haul it around on a triple axle trailer that I built, it has ( 3 ) 6,000 lb axles and is all my single tire F-250 with a gas engine wants to haul.

    The new 12,000 lb truck weighs in at about 18,000 lbs and a new trailer to haul it will weigh about 5,000 lbs... am I crazy to even consider pulling a 23,000 lb load.
    Unfortunately my F-550 already weighs out at 18,000 lbs as my welding rig with a crane and compressor on it.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Davidson NC USA
    Posts
    1,345
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    443
    Likes (Received)
    772

    Default

    Yes, too much weight for your present truck.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    363
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    161

    Default

    ya, kind of answering my own question here after going to the Ford website, it looks like I need a dual rear wheel, diesel with a gooseneck trailer to do what I want to do... Damnit, I like to be able to run my single rear wheel truck through the drive through wash... cant do that with a dually.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,131
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    194
    Likes (Received)
    269

    Default

    One ton dully with tandem axel duel trailer would be the bare minimum. Medium duty truck would be better. Be on the lookout for a power company digger truck they have a badass crane on them, might be helpful in your work.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    10,349
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    17399
    Likes (Received)
    5404

    Default

    You get to the point of asking "What does my company and myself do ?"

    I thought you provide fabrication services, and this being the remote
    part of the work.

    I really think you need a 10 ton tag trailer, hooked up to
    at minimum a 5 ton dump with at least 10.00-20 duals.

    The cost of all this truck, trailer, licesnsing, CDL's etc
    is just to haul this forklift ?

    I would farm out the moving of this forklift, and add it on the bill.
    (your adding it on right now, just not realizing it)

    Do what your good at, and pay others to do what they are
    good at.

  6. Likes mmarquette, Garwood, Bill in PA liked this post
  7. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    3,641
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3897
    Likes (Received)
    1815

    Default

    Seems like a strange question to me. If you need to own such a forklift and move it from job to job sure seems like you would be aware of this stuff?

    If you're a general heavy fab shop I get owning a 12k lift. You fab heavy stuff and load onto customers truck.

    If you are needing a 12k lift to load a heavy item onto your truck and hauling the forklift to the site to unload/install stuff you need a class 8 truck and are in divisible load territory (so you can't haul it all anyway).

  8. Likes digger doug, tdmidget liked this post
  9. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Milwaukee,WI
    Posts
    861
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5123
    Likes (Received)
    655

    Default

    If your 7000# forklift was good enough why don.t you buy a reman engine . Install it tomorrow and your problem is solved.

  10. Likes digger doug, Ox liked this post
  11. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    363
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    161

    Default

    I probably wear to many hats, Ive been a portable welder for the last 30 years as well as owning a fab shop with 6 overhead cranes, so we have 2 welding rigs, one of them has a IMT crane that has a 20' boom that will lift 6000 lbs 6' out or 1840 at 20' out, ( Tru Temper ) Ya, a crane is a must, we also cut holes through buildings as well for several door companies, so we own several concrete saws, a dump trailer, a small 43 hp diesel backhoe, equipment trailer... we are also a conveyor company as well, I maintained several FedEx ground terminals for 18 years.
    I'm in the process of rebuilding the engine in the 7000 lb lift truck that weighs 12000 lbs and entertaining the prospect of being able to haul the new forklift that weighs 18000 lbs.

  12. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    10,349
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    17399
    Likes (Received)
    5404

    Default

    The problem as I see it, is that your cost's are hidden.

    When you go out on a job, do you itemize the bill, as if you were renting all this equipment you drag out there ?

    Or do you just charge a flat rate per hour for portable work ?

    Owning (instead of renting by the day), you have allot of cash tied up,
    that could be used elsewhere.

    Also, having a concrete saw is nice, but what if you need 3 on a job ?

    A rental house will rent you all you need, for as long as you need.

    Most will also deliver them to the job site, so your not playing "$65 an hour
    trucker".

  13. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    363
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    161

    Default

    As far as wearing to many hats... I need to belong to the following trade unions, Pipe Welder, Mill Wright, Operating engineers, Carpenters, concrete, electricians and I'm sure I forgot a few... oh... lets not forget the sanitation union because I'm also the head bathroom cleaner as well.
    I might not be good at any one trade, but I sure have a lot of people fooled into thinking I am.
    When your a small company you have to wear a lot of hats to keep yourself busy.

  14. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    10,349
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    17399
    Likes (Received)
    5404

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Portable Welder View Post
    As far as wearing to many hats... I need to belong to the following trade unions, Pipe Welder, Mill Wright, Operating engineers, Carpenters, concrete, electricians and I'm sure I forgot a few... oh... lets not forget the sanitation union because I'm also the head bathroom cleaner as well.
    I might not be good at any one trade, but I sure have a lot of people fooled into thinking I am.
    When your a small company you have to wear a lot of hats to keep yourself busy.
    You keep broadcasting, and not replying.

    I don't care what you are.

    I work with all the trades, and my contracting company owner friends have a couple of crews (not huge companies), and they ditched most all hand power tools, for a leasing package. Same with JLG's and concrete saws, etc.

    I do know that your watered down way, way too much.

    "Cash Flow" mean anything to you ?

  15. Likes Garwood, dkmc, triumph406, Philabuster liked this post
  16. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    BFE Nevada/San Marcos Tx
    Posts
    389
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    289
    Likes (Received)
    173

    Default

    Between truck and trailer, the GVW will put you into CDL territory EMPTY.

  17. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    new plymouth id
    Posts
    264
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    22
    Likes (Received)
    70

    Default

    I have hauled those numbers on a gooseneck behind a dodge diesel with 19.5 tires its not good. the trailer brakes have to work and when the trailer plug comes out on a down hill run all you can do is cuss or pray and you most likely will be doing one or the other. when I was first starting my business I did what I had to do, did a lot of heavy equipment moving sunday nights. now I use a 550 and am legal least according to my favorite DOT officer who enjoys finding something to write tickets over. still want to size up to a midsize with air brakes like a fl70.
    but for numbers. both of my dually goosenecks weighs in at 6600 lbs so loaded your 19,000 lbs of trailer, with 5000 lbs of tongue weight but your overall weight even with a gasser will be over 30,000 so way into class A cdl

  18. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Upstate NY -In the Flats next to the corn fields
    Posts
    8,772
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1339
    Likes (Received)
    2210

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dalmatiangirl61 View Post
    Between truck and trailer, the GVW will put you into CDL territory EMPTY.
    Yea, from his posts, I'm just gonna guess here, that he's totally ignoring any and all D.O.T. rules and regs. Never been pulled over yet.

    MOST DO...........apparently .......till they get caught once......or twice?

  19. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    744
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    325
    Likes (Received)
    215

    Default

    Go get a new ram and a trailer with capacity and call it a day. Better have cdl to.

  20. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    363
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    161

    Default

    Digger Doug, I used to rent the stuff but the cost of taking it back and forth eats up way too much time and money, we own the scaffolding, 2 duct lifts, shoring posts and several concrete saws, we use this stuff at least once a month, to answer your question: we bid these jobs so I take everything into consideration and no, I dont have cash flow problems...
    dkmc, No, I dont ignore the law, we have class A CDL without air brakes and even my F-250 pick up has a weight plate so I can pull the 3 trailers legally. We also stay up on our medical cards and the yearly DOT truck inspections, my customers are UPS, the power company, asphalt and concrete plants... Those companies don't tolerate ( Fly by the seat of your pants type companies ) However, I do think that on the rare occasion that I need the big lift truck out on the job it makes more sense to hire that one out.

  21. #17
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Tennessee
    Posts
    306
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    51
    Likes (Received)
    166

    Default

    What kind of 12,000 LB lift are we talking about? Air tire or solid tire? With a solid tire forklift, it’s going to take some sort of custom gooseneck trailer to be able to load/unload. Your standard gooseneck dovetail/ramp setup isn’t make to handle a solid tire lift.

    I understand you wanting a bigger lift, just understand that the jump from a 7k lift to a 12k is a big jump. You really need a class 8 truck/trailer combo, or at least class 6 setup with a heavy tag-along. You can get into a older class 8 setup as cheap or cheaper than you can a dually/gooseneck setup.

    Decent class 8 trucks can be had in the $15k range and trailers in the $10k range. That would be a much better setup and allow you many more hauling options.

  22. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    363
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    161

    Default

    m16ty, I think for right now I'll just pay to have it hauled, the ramp thing would be an issue, my current trailer sits really low and has long ramps.

  23. #19
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Tennessee
    Posts
    306
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    51
    Likes (Received)
    166

    Default

    I also understand the pain of renting or hiring hauling. We rent quite a bit of specialty equipment but are slowly buying so we don’t have to rent as much.

    It is more cost effective on paper to rent seldom used items. The thing that hurts you is the logistics on getting it to the job, having to wait sometimes on availability, and getting it back to the rental yard.

    When you need something, you need it, and don’t want to have to deal with delays waiting on the rental outfit to get it to you, or wait on a hired truck to deliver your equipment.

  24. Likes converterking liked this post
  25. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    363
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    161

    Default

    m16ty, I couldn't agree more, if I find the need to have it on the job on a regular bases, I will then get a truck and trailer for it.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •