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  1. #21
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    The most important bit from ewlsey's point and the back and forth around it is "what are the rules where you are?" - the rules in the US are quite complicated both because of the many states, and because of the federal regulations, AND because of constitutional limits on the federal regs.
    The OP is in the UK, where a very different set of rules apply.
    At least in WA state (1) horse trailers and RVs are exempt, and it seems that RVs well over 10,000 indeed over 26,000 lbs are driven around the US by people who don't have CDLs.
    At least in WA, if it's a rental truck that you rent on a short term basis there are somewhat different rules.
    Trailers of 10,000 or less don't count against GCVWR in WA, but a trailer of 10,001 # DOES - so there's an obivous premium for 10K or less trailers (and you see lots of 9990 and 9950 gross trailers....)

  2. #22
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    I can't imagine that European truck regulations are any worse than here, but anything is possible.

    It's actually much easier than it used to be. Back in the days before apportioned plates and IFTA, you had to register your truck in every state you drove in. You'd see trucks with 6 license plates, or a plate with a dozen registration tags called "bingo plates". You could also get a driver's license in every state.

    Also, it is very true about the state level rules. IL used to have Class II and Class III truck routes that only allowed 8' width, not 8'6" like you get everywhere else. That effectively prohibits all trucks.

    Places like Michigan let you haul up to 160,000 gross if you have enough axles. You see trucks and trailers there with 12-20 axles. Other states allow annual overweight permits.

    In the western states, you see a lot more double trailers. This is regional too. Super Bs and Rocky Mountain Doubles can be 129,000 gross.

  3. #23
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    I'm all but sure that Europe is worse, based on what drivers of race trailer tractors told me (at least for France.)
    1. There are number of places where heavy trucks are not allowed to run on Sunday.
    2. The weight limits may be different - see some of the posts by UK members above
    3. Seems that most heavy trucks have either speed limiters, or automatic recording devices, or both
    4. A lot of them seem to have numbers posted on them that seem to be speed limits in KPH.
    Maybe not "worse" on the whole, but probably on the whole not much easier than the US.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by sable View Post
    I think Demons' tyres will have burst long before this point.
    I reckon they might have done, along with my a hole!

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  6. #25
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    The general gist as I can tell in the UK. You do it for money you have a lot of hoops to jump through. Guess thats the same for most places these days.
    For the little guy or just for fun its still a mine field, in that there seems to be a lot grey area. Ie the rules seem vague, especially around towing or using trailers. You can be done by the cops or waved on by VOSA, or vise versa.
    I was coming back off mi hols the other day and was sat next to long term lorry driver. He seems to done most gigs in his long career. Hes driving a 50 ton rig that carries the weights around for calibrating weigh bridges, uses a forklift that hangs of the back load / unload. Said that he cant wait to tugged by VOSA, cos he knows pinpoint what his rig weighs . Apparently VOSA is a private company, i didnt know that. Its all about the fines!
    The police, all depends on who you get. They seem to range from really cool to complete c**ts. A good friend whos done his time in the police said once. for the most part, providing youre not driving like a tool and have a sensible looking setup, youll be left alone. Get a road side stop check or bored Traffic Patrol. Goooood luck! Normal plod and Traffic, dont like each other much apparently.

    Going back the lorry driver. His face when I tried to explain how the winch lorries work . You just dont see them over here. I think thats half the real reason I wanna have a go at one

  7. #26
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    Anyone have any interesting links or comments on the rollers of these rigs? What sort of bearings they use etc.

    Truck and Trailer parts, Oilfield tail rollers, pop up rollers, winch truck rollers and bumpers

  8. #27
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    I would be surprised if that's anything other than a piece of heavy wall DOM tubing rolling on another piece of DOM tubing or solid round, grease lube in between. It's the perfect low-speed high capacity roller, just make it heavy and thick.

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  10. #28
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    Love these trucks.

  11. #29
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    Looks like it takes some real skill to operate that thing and not end up with a big mess or a bad headache.

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  13. #30
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    All the videos show them moving large things that seemly mostly designed for being moved by such trucks, and for short distances - as though these things are only ever moved a couple hundred yards? Wonder how they get to the camp, or on to the next camp?

    And while they're fun to watch on video for a little while, it quickly becomes obvious that it would be a very repetitive job indeed. Though I suppose no worse than being a long haul trucker?

  14. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by ewlsey View Post
    Looks like it takes some real skill to operate that thing and not end up with a big mess or a bad headache.
    Id agree. But, what rigging doesnt need skill and understanding. Fork lift and crane fail videos aplenty on yt.

    Quote Originally Posted by bryan_machine View Post
    All the videos show them moving large things that seemly mostly designed for being moved by such trucks, and for short distances - as though these things are only ever moved a couple hundred yards? Wonder how they get to the camp, or on to the next camp?
    Yep. Most videos are of oil tanks (i think thats what they are) but there are some of gen sets and pumps, all skid mounted. The way I see it, imagine just the skid, no tank, with eyes to strap and chain to. Anything you could strap to that skid could be hauled up onto the truck. Id imagine the only thing of real concern is where the item is mounted to the skid. Wouldnt want it to far back or the skid would point to the sky lol. Was thinking the skid could even double as a 'bed' for the truck. Ie just a winch and roller mounted to a relativly lightweight frame with outriggers. (as per last video). The skid could lock down to that.
    As for delivering. same trucks are used id imagine, just strap the load down and away you go. Ive seen trailers to with rollers on the back. some are flat beds and some are more frame like. You notice the disc in front of the roller (last vid). is a mount for trailer connect isnt it?
    All fascinating stuff to me.

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  16. #33
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    It really doesn't seem that different than a roll-off dumpster to me.


    And here is something far more practical every day ...


    Imagine the flatbed ... set it down, put your machinery on and secure it really well - STUPID easy. Now just pick it up and drive away! The idea of multiple beds would allow anything from a camper, enclosed work area (I used to do splicing work in the back of a truck working for an ISP), dump beds, a tanker setup, and anything else a creative builder wanted to put on the back of a truck.

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  18. #34
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    I'm sure hydraulics work well for raising the bed as well, but on a smaller 1-ton type truck I bet you could adapt a transfer case with a really favorable custom reduction and a threaded axle. I've seen a few contractors with boom trucks using anything from chain drive to large threaded axles so it should work. Might be an easier retrofit for personal use if your donor truck doesn't have a PTO.

    I was talking with my wife the other day about my desire to own every pre-1950 piece of milling and turning equipment that I can fit into my 2car garage and how I could fix them up for resale as a hobby; but that moving them is a PITA. Originally I was going to use parallel i-beams with small pneumatic tires on axles (axles are for each i-beam, so the middle is open) and then bolt up a gantry lift of sorts. The idea was to get the lift over the equipment and lift it high enough to roll into the driveway and winch onto a trailer. It seems like pallet jacks and this setup may be much more practical.

    The short version: thanks for the thread, it really gave me some great ideas!

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    My latest toy, only lifts 4000, but nice and easy...

    Twin deck winches to run trolley..

    https://www.scalemates.com/kits/3422...7-bomb-service

    Limited height and footprint of load, of course.. A WWII Jeep would load fine though..

    Tires, doors, bed floor, needed. All the winches work fine,,

  20. #36
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    Mainerism
    Interesting setup on the pickup. Very similar minus the tilting bed, kinda like a removable tilt an slide. Looks like theres more control this way at the added complexity of hydraulics. Also makes unloading easier, no need to slide the load off the back like they do with the tanks lol.
    Nice idea on the threaded drive too. I also like the idea of strapping the machine to a bed / skid then hauling it up onto the truck. Would ensure you focus on the strapping, which cant be bad

    abarnsley
    oooh you have that for real. Pics please


    While were on an army theme, them boys know how to get it done!
    m88-recovery-vehicle-camp-warhorse-terry-moore.jpgm88a1-crane.jpg
    bit o blurb on the beast

  21. #37
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    I love the Hercules! When I was in the Army I was witness to an incident that required an m88. A small tracked APC had gone too close to a soft shoulder on a road and rolled down a decent hill, and the HEMTT wrecker that came to retrieve it also ended wrong side up at the base of the hill. It was something else to see a huge Oshkosh plucked from the mud/bushes like it was nothing. I wish I could find all my old pictures, but it was in 2002-2006 when we were all transitioning from film cameras to digital and I was too young to realize I'd miss them a decade later.

    Someday I may remember my old email address - I think I sent them to some friends stateside and they may be in there.

  22. #38
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    Gin trucks are the shit. Perfect for nudging huge loads around the yard.

    My old man was sitting in his office at a well servicing company when someone came in to get the keys for a gin truck. The yard manager asked if the guy knew how to run it, the hand said yes, and the manager gave him the keys. Well some time passed and the hand returned, complaining the truck wouldn't drive. This surprised the yard manager so they went outside to investigate. The truck wouldn't drive because somehow the PTO had gotten engaged, and as the guy went inside to find help the winch had pulled the poles onto the cab and sucked the truck flat.

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  24. #39
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    Cheers for the stories gents. Brilliant!

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    I plan to build a custom detachable gooseneck lowboy in the next couple of years to pull the toys and retrieve future equiptment.


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