Would it be safe to move a large radial drill using a Landoll? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garwood View Post
    A lot of manual jobs I run across are a combo of bullard and HBM stuff. Bullard's easy to move.
    I'm still waiting for this to work out for me. I do just enough with my 42" Bullard that it isn't quite for sale yet, but it's next on the chopping block when I need more floor.

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garwood View Post
    It has the original 1960's manuals with it and states weight as a tick under 25,000 lbs for a 19" column with 6 ft arm.

    She's a big girl.
    Seems so. Built more for stiff and heavy drilling rather than "reach".
    The 8-foot ATW I once ran had only around a ten or eleven inch column.
    "IF.. memory serves.. !" 1960's and it was already older than I was, so it might NOT!



    Not a lot wrong with a Landoll, BTW. For what it is GOOD at.
    I just don't see it a "fit" as to loading and unloading THIS rig.

    You DID get that shot spot-on right up-front, first post - even before possible ground movement & tilt was brought-up:
    I'd have to tilt the Landoll and drag it off to get it into my shop.

    Sounds a bit too puckery for me, but anyone done it?
    Even so, at $1,000 in crane call-out and time, (figuring both ends), it would still be a Helluva deal!

    I figure I'm about $4,000 into the Alzmetall column drill vs an $800 raw purchase price. That includes a one-way air ticket as part of the complex go-fetch.. "etc'.

    OTOH, "Old Iron" can be easiest for the "Old".

    In my 70's arredy at the time, I tend to make "mini-vacation outings" out of a go-fetch, rig, and roll-wheels ... to keep the boredom factor of a sedentary retirement at bay!

    Folks who actually still have a "job" might not be able to spare the f**k-around time and costs as easily as if it were a fishing or hunting outing!


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  5. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hillside Fab View Post
    I'm still waiting for this to work out for me. I do just enough with my 42" Bullard that it isn't quite for sale yet, but it's next on the chopping block when I need more floor.
    That hits home right there because the Bullard I can get a deal on is a newer 42" with digitals and overall a creampuff. The only pending job I could use a bullard for at the moment is 51" diameter.

    I have several older friends that made their livelyhoods with manual machines. Where did that work go? I'm surrounded by lumber. aggregate, 1000 acre farms and a rolling mill and most of the work I get is emergency repairs from subcontractors to the mills and broken bolts and driveshaft repairs for the ag customers.

    I would enjoy doing a little bit of everything repair work and fab, but I'd need about 5 times the volume I get now to make a livable wage at it and that would just be me, no employees.

    Seems like every year another heavy machine shop closes up in Western Oregon. There aren't that many more to lose.

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    I am taking my 36 inch Bullard home because I cant get scrap price for it, but its more handy the a drill...Phil

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  8. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil in Montana View Post
    I am taking my 36 inch Bullard home because I cant get scrap price for it, but its more handy the a drill...Phil
    The one I can buy is $2000. It weighs 19,500. So right at or a tick above scrap price.

    Times are crazy. CNC's are similar though. I'm struggling with not buying one of the finest, if not THE finest HMC ever made. If I could feed it the 75KVA it needs I would be moving it right now. I just don't have the pixies for a 10k rpm 50 taper 40HP spindle.

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  10. #26
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    What is the Bullard, a SD or a Cutmaster?...Phil

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil in Montana View Post
    What is the Bullard, a SD or a Cutmaster?...Phil
    42 Cutmaster

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    What a deal, not long ago this would be a 25k machine...Phil

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    Quote Originally Posted by Garwood View Post
    That hits home right there because the Bullard I can get a deal on is a newer 42" with digitals and overall a creampuff. The only pending job I could use a bullard for at the moment is 51" diameter.

    I have several older friends that made their livelyhoods with manual machines. Where did that work go? I'm surrounded by lumber. aggregate, 1000 acre farms and a rolling mill and most of the work I get is emergency repairs from subcontractors to the mills and broken bolts and driveshaft repairs for the ag customers.

    I would enjoy doing a little bit of everything repair work and fab, but I'd need about 5 times the volume I get now to make a livable wage at it and that would just be me, no employees.

    Seems like every year another heavy machine shop closes up in Western Oregon. There aren't that many more to lose.
    I think the 42" will actually swing mid 50s, if you can chuck the part.

    Anything designed in the last ~20 yrs, the engineers have caught on to the possibilities of CNC, so there are tapers, radii, slots, angled holes, etc - pretty much just because they can.

  14. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garwood View Post
    42 Cutmaster
    42" cutmaster should weigh closer to 2x your 19k estimate.

    Depends on what it has for heads. Mine weighs approx 43k. It's a Man-Au-Trol with side head. So it has some extra weight in those boxes, but I think a cutmaster should be at least 35k. Oconnell Machinery has all the sales brochures on their website.

    Vertical Turret Lathes | O'Connell Machinery Co, Inc.

    Base machine is 25k, the main turret head adds 3,700, side head adds 6,800, ram adds 3,300.

    IMO these are pretty limited without the ram or a turret you can kick on an angle to cut a taper. Mine can only cut whatever tapers the feed gear ratios allow, and it's too much of a PITA to ever try to do anything like that.

    edit: or does the drill weigh 19.5?

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  16. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garwood View Post
    It has the original 1960's manuals with it and states weight as a tick under 25,000 lbs for a 19" column with 6 ft arm.

    She's a big girl.
    Fair enough. If it's in the book it must be so, 19" is a big column.

    Regards Tyrone.


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