Would you drive 1300 miles with 7.5K-8k load on a surge brake trailer?
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  1. #1
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    Default Would you drive 1300 miles with 7.5K-8k load on a surge brake trailer?

    Sunbelt tilt bed trailer. Payload capacity 10,000lbs. Only has surge brakes. Conventional trailer, not a gooseneck.


    Would you drive 1300 miles with a lathe weighing around 7500 - 8000 lbs with just surge brakes?


    My truck is a 2013 Silverado 4x4 crewcab 2500HD diesel. I got a 2.5 inch receiver hitch. Truck towing capacity (trailer+payload) is 15,800 lbs, according to Chevy dealer who looked up my VIN number.

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    That would depend a bit on where the 1300 miles took you. Through Chicago? Probably not. Decent roads and no big-city traffic, I'd consider it. Get the load right on the trailer, well secured, and test the brakes before you really need them. Keep in mind that *technically* a trailer over 10,000lbs can be CDL territory, unless you can argue casual use.

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    Yes and without any worry.
    Done so many times with 12,000 lbs Michigan to Florida. (boat)
    I actually like surge brakes better. I hate electric and the fiddle fart dial in adjustment which is never quite right.
    There is the added pain go lock it out when backing up but I'm sure you know that.
    All in all a simpler system that works well.

    Not sure why though Chicago and the stop and go a bad for such. Atlanta sort of the same.
    Bob

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    Quote Originally Posted by rabler View Post
    That would depend a bit on where the 1300 miles took you. Through Chicago? Probably not. Decent roads and no big-city traffic, I'd consider it. Get the load right on the trailer, well secured, and test the brakes before you really need them. Keep in mind that *technically* a trailer over 10,000lbs can be CDL territory, unless you can argue casual use.

    From Wisconsin to Texas unloaded. From Texas to Wisconsin loaded. I can circumvent Chicago.

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    Sunbelt has 2 options for me.


    A Felling FT-12it-i-g , like below. Sunbelt says it has a 8,000 payload but Felling's site says 12,000lbs. Surge brakes




    It has a Pintle hitch , while my hitch is a 2.5" ball. I assume I can just get a Pintle hitch and there would be no issue using it with the receiver on my truck?


    The other option is an EZRamp , Model: EZ1480E.
    Payload according to Sunbelt is 11,000lbs. Tandem axle tilt-bed . Has Electric brakes.

    Below picture is just one I grabbed online. Sunbelt says their trailer has tie-down points for chains and straps.





    Which would you choose, the Felling on top or the EZRamp on the bottom? Felling has Surge Brakes. EZRamp has electric brakes.

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    Why is this even a question?

    Little trailer, little load, decent tow rig. I don't get it. There's nothing even remotely challenging about this.

    I would tow that in a heartbeat WITHOUT trailer brakes. Through an ice storm with one headlight burned out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Garwood View Post
    Why is this even a question?

    Little trailer, little load, decent tow rig. I don't get it. There's nothing even remotely challenging about this.

    I would tow that in a heartbeat WITHOUT trailer brakes. Through an ice storm with one headlight burned out.

    I have almost no expereince towing. And never towed anything over 1000 lbs. So felt I should ask for some advice and which trailer the folks here would prefer.

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    Get the one with electric brakes and a regular hitch, the clunking sound of the pintle hitch will drive you madd on that distance, and personally I hate surge brakes. Load wise that should not be a problem for your truck, do you have the electric brake controller installed?

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    Me and a few of my friends have rented the lower trailer style quite a few times from sunbelt and were always happy with it. In fact I declared that I would not move any more machines without using that trailer, no more screwing around with hoists or tractors trying to unload. It is also easier to load because the angle is lower and the tie downs work well with chains or hook straps. If you try to use clam shell style hooks you will be out of luck.
    The trailer I rented had no way to lock out the surge brakes so backing up the hill to my shed was fun. Also be aware you can hang the trailer off your hitch if you lower the trailer/raise the wheels far enough.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spud View Post
    I have almost no expereince towing. And never towed anything over 1000 lbs. So felt I should ask for some advice and which trailer the folks here would prefer.
    Does Sunbelt require the trailer returned to the same rental lot. If not drive down empty and rent in Texas and leave it at the Wisconsin.
    Properly loaded that's not challenging load. Start your breaking father back.

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    We have pulled close to 21,000lbs with a 08 chevy 2500 diesel. 16,000lbs pacemaker on a 20,000lbs rated trailer, no gooseneck, just a pintle. That was a 5 hour, 1 way drive.

    We do have our cdls though too.

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    Electric brakes on the trailer usually requires an electronic brake controller installed in your truck. If you don't have that, surge brakes is the only realistic option.
    Your truck should haul that load fairly well. Make sure you check your truck tire pressure. Stopping will take considerably more distance, and you won't accelerate quickly. But the diesel will haul the load. Take corners a bit slower and keep in mind, especially when turning through an intersection, that the trailer will cut to the inside of the turn so you will need to swing a little wide of obstructions or other vehicles.

    Chain the load to the trailer. Braking will put the most stress on your tie downs, so plan accordingly. Also, most lathes are top heavy, so you want it secured in such a way that the lathe can't roll over. Make sure the center of gravity of the lathe is slightly forward of the trailer axles. Read up on trailer loading. You don't want a trailer fishtailing.

    Any chance that you have a friend/acquaintance/coworker that has hauled heavy loads before? Someone to help in loading, securing, and trade off driving is a worthwhile thing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dalmatiangirl61 View Post
    Get the one with electric brakes and a regular hitch, the clunking sound of the pintle hitch will drive you madd on that distance, and personally I hate surge brakes. Load wise that should not be a problem for your truck, do you have the electric brake controller installed?
    Yes my truck does have a controller for electric brakes. It's got the factory trailer towing option with the little trailer symbol on the transmission selector stalk and a switch to adjust trailer braking.

    Quote Originally Posted by mllud22 View Post
    Does Sunbelt require the trailer returned to the same rental lot. If not drive down empty and rent in Texas and leave it at the Wisconsin.
    Properly loaded that's not challenging load. Start your breaking father back.
    Sunbelt requires I bring the trailer back to the same location. Didn't check the Texas Sunbelt locations to see if they had a similar trailer; these trailers are only available in some locations.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kenton View Post
    Me and a few of my friends have rented the lower trailer style quite a few times from sunbelt and were always happy with it. In fact I declared that I would not move any more machines without using that trailer, no more screwing around with hoists or tractors trying to unload. It is also easier to load because the angle is lower and the tie downs work well with chains or hook straps. If you try to use clam shell style hooks you will be out of luck.
    The trailer I rented had no way to lock out the surge brakes so backing up the hill to my shed was fun. Also be aware you can hang the trailer off your hitch if you lower the trailer/raise the wheels far enough.

    What is the clamshell style of hook, do you mean like below picture?




    I have the above hook style of straps and the below style of straps. When I moved my Kearney & Trecker Autometric, Rivett lathe and Abene mill on a Ford F550 stakebed, I used the below style.




    Can you explain what you meant by hanging the trailer off the hitch ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by rabler View Post
    Electric brakes on the trailer usually requires an electronic brake controller installed in your truck. If you don't have that, surge brakes is the only realistic option.
    Your truck should haul that load fairly well. Make sure you check your truck tire pressure. Stopping will take considerably more distance, and you won't accelerate quickly. But the diesel will haul the load. Take corners a bit slower and keep in mind, especially when turning through an intersection, that the trailer will cut to the inside of the turn so you will need to swing a little wide of obstructions or other vehicles.

    Chain the load to the trailer. Braking will put the most stress on your tie downs, so plan accordingly.
    Also, most lathes are top heavy, so you want it secured in such a way that the lathe can't roll over. Make sure the center of gravity of the lathe is slightly forward of the trailer axles. Read up on trailer loading. You don't want a trailer fishtailing.

    Any chance that you have a friend/acquaintance/coworker that has hauled heavy loads before? Someone to help in loading, securing, and trade off driving is a worthwhile thing.
    Wrap a strap around the chuck, and anchored on both sides, and you should be good.


    -------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

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    The hardware store straps work just fine .....commercial ones have a double loose hook ,one piece clips over the other,to provide a full encircle of the rail.......Ive never had a fail of the el cheapo open hooks......Anyho,as to the brakes ....ever towed 80 tons with NO trailer brakes ...and conversely ,no truck brakes ? That gets hairy.........Towing trailers of any kind is as safe as your driving......if you simply cant abide having enough space to the front vehicle for fear someone will cut in,then you will have a nasty accident ,for sure.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spud View Post
    Yes my truck does have a controller for electric brakes. It's got the factory trailer towing option with the little trailer symbol on the transmission selector stalk and a switch to adjust trailer braking.
    Sounds very easy. Try this size load behind a 68 stick shift Camaro for more fun and excitement.
    Simple hitch on my Buick Electra 225. The bumper tore off so that a oh-poop day.
    Bob

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    Be sure your truck and trailer tires are inflated to the spec on the tire, and check them often with a walk-around.
    Be sure your straps or ropes don't ride over any sharp edges. actually, a 1/8 radius edge can be too sharp so a bit of carpet or something might be due.
    Good to take along a navigator if you know somebody willing.
    check fluids before starting.
    Can of fuel cant hurt.
    The South (I-40) route is much flatter than I-70.

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    It occurs to me that all advice bad.
    The OP has never pulled over 1000 pounds.
    Now 10,000 and a trip of good length.
    Such trips need to have somethings to not be just boring.
    One needs stories to tell about the journey.
    Bob

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spud View Post
    Yes my truck does have a controller for electric brakes. It's got the factory trailer towing option with the little trailer symbol on the transmission selector stalk and a switch to adjust trailer braking.
    Sounds like truck is ready to go, only question left is what load range tires, I'd recommend load range E. Where are you going in Texas? Note, its still hot down there.


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