Mazak Lathe Model Recommendations
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    Default Mazak Lathe Model Recommendations

    Hello PM Mazak members,

    We are a 2 man shop that makes motorsport parts and we are looking for our first lathe.

    We were contemplating getting a Haas ST15/20, but after recently watching a 98' Mazak QT20 in action, we are thinking of going with a used Mazak instead of a new Haas.

    Most of the parts that we plan on making are +/- .002", with an occasional +/-0.0005" on one feature. Mainly going to be turning 6061,304/316, some low carbon and 41XX series steel.

    The Mazak QT20 looks like a similar in size to a Haas ST20, but we are willing to shell out more for a Y axis/live tool and a sub spindle. We would like for the machine to be year 2000+, but we are open to 90' models. We plan on using Fusion360 or Mastercam for CAM and the Mazatrol for simple parts.

    If you guys could please make some machine model recommendations, we would greatly appreciate it.

    Also have the following questions.

    Any models to avoid or know problems with controls?
    Any Mazak techs on the east cost that anyone recommends?

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    I have a SQT 200ms (milling with sub spindle no y axis) with 640 control, that we are rebuilding right now. send me a pm if interested.

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    I think to get Y axis and sub spindle you have to move into the SQT (super quick turn). I have 5 of them at work and 1 at home. The 90's are mostly T+ series. 1998 can be T+ or fusion control, have 1 of each. The SQT 15 MSY is pretty much the same as the 200 MSY with the 200 being a newer model with a new dress on. I think the T+ is a more rigid control since you do not have a PC hard drive. I have had 2 go dead. If you are thinking of a T+ machine, most have the EIA option, but make sure it does so you can program G code with your software. The T+ model you will want a Mark II. It will have a servo driven turret and live tool motor as opposed to a hyd turret on previous models. The 1 that is not a Mark II I have will not rigid tap with live tools.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Justin_Terry View Post
    I have a SQT 200ms (milling with sub spindle no y axis) with 640 control, that we are rebuilding right now. send me a pm if interested.
    Thanks for the reply, I'm in Brooklyn, NY, a bit far from you to inspect the machine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chad883 View Post
    I think to get Y axis and sub spindle you have to move into the SQT (super quick turn). I have 5 of them at work and 1 at home. The 90's are mostly T+ series. 1998 can be T+ or fusion control, have 1 of each. The SQT 15 MSY is pretty much the same as the 200 MSY with the 200 being a newer model with a new dress on. I think the T+ is a more rigid control since you do not have a PC hard drive. I have had 2 go dead. If you are thinking of a T+ machine, most have the EIA option, but make sure it does so you can program G code with your software. The T+ model you will want a Mark II. It will have a servo driven turret and live tool motor as opposed to a hyd turret on previous models. The 1 that is not a Mark II I have will not rigid tap with live tools.
    Thanks for the reply. What's your overall review on them? From what I've read and seen, they are reliable (depending on how you treat them and maintain them) and can perform quite well.

    Do you know if the SQT model name was changed in the early 2000s? All the SQT models that I found have been 96'-01"

    I'm guessing that MSY stands for Mill, Sub Spindle and Y axis? If so, this model looks like the one I want.

    How do you check if they have a EIA Option?

    Was the Mark II option standard after a certain date? I want to be able to to rigid tap with live tools.

    I'm still researching/trying to understand about what models had what and what options were available. Are the live tools holders a Mazak proprietary mounting pattern/drive or can they run other holders?

    I'm still at least a month or two away from buying anything. I want to be familiar with the machine and control before I make a purchase.

    Thanks again for the input

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    We have numerous Mazaks in many configurations. To the best of my knowledge, Mazak holders are proprietary, but very easy to find, both new and used. Expect to pay 2,000 plus for new rotary holders. 3,000 plus for dual rotary holders. To rebuild a used holder is about half the price of a new one. They are very reliable. We have some that are 20 years and older, and still cranking out the money. Parts are easy to find, or in the case of boards, easy to find someone to repair them.

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    Do you know if the SQT model name was changed in the early 2000s? All the SQT models that I found have been 96'-01"

    Not sure when they changed, I have 1994 but its not a mark II

    I'm guessing that MSY stands for Mill, Sub Spindle and Y axis? If so, this model looks like the one I want.

    Yes

    How do you check if they have a EIA Option?

    soft keys : Diag, Version, Option. What is installed is highlighter

    Was the Mark II option standard after a certain date? I want to be able to to rigid tap with live tools.

    I believe 1995 it started

    I'm still researching/trying to understand about what models had what and what options were available. Are the live tools holders a Mazak proprietary mounting pattern/drive?

    Yes

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    My SQT 250 MS is a 1999 machine with Fusion control. 4-5 years later I added a QTN 250 MSY, Fusion control. Mazak technicians are almost done setting up a new QTN250 MSY with Smooth G control.
    Interesting that I originally asked about a QTN250 MS and was told that it was going to cost more to get one without the Y axis. About 6 weeks from order date to ship date.

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    Mazak stopped using the SQT name in the late 90s/early 2000s, when they came out with the Nexus machines (all white).

    The Nexus machines are QTN...,
    with the corresponding number referring to the size of the machine. And any following letters designate the options (milling, Y-axis, sub-spindle).

    Make sure you see the machine in person (or at least a good video), because all the SQTs and Nexus machines have integral-spindles, and are $15k+ to have rebuilt if noisy or damaged.

    ToolCat

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    I'm guessing Smooth control would be out of your price range but maybe if you could find a lease machine that had been turned in. The Smooth control can make programming super quick and easy because you can import Parasolids into the machine and pull points and shapes and stuff using the 3D Assist function. It pulls up a window while programming and can input them directly into the program. I only recently got into using it on a Variaxis and a Horizontal but I can see it's going to be really helpful. Maybe less so on a lathe when stuff has less features but something I thought you should know about to consider.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cnctoolcat View Post
    Mazak stopped using the SQT name in the late 90’s/early 2000’s, when they came out with the Nexus machines (all white).

    The Nexus machines are QTN...,
    with the corresponding number referring to the size of the machine. And any following letters designate the options (milling, Y-axis, sub-spindle).

    Make sure you see the machine in person (or at least a good video), because all the SQT’s and Nexus machines have integral-spindles, and are $15k+ to have rebuilt if noisy or damaged.

    ToolCat
    Does that include pulling and install? I have had one rebuilt at Spindles Plus for just over half that. I pulled and installed it myself. They did a great job. 1 job I run ramps up to 5000RPM for about 40 seconds, then swap parts and so it again. Kind of hard on the spindle, but it is a very particular part of our assembly so can't do anything about the abuse to the spindle.

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    Thank you everyone for the reply's and input. The budget is 45k including delivery, from the brief online searching I've done, most sellers ask about 29-37k for a 96-02' SQT200MSY, have not found many nexus machines for sale.

    Does this price sound correct?

    @chad883

    Thank you for the tip and info on the EIA control option and look up.

    @Gobo

    Thanks for the info on the holders, I'll make sure to try to get a few with my purchase. I'm guessing that boring bar/drill holders and "stick" holders are also proprietary?

    @cnctoolcat

    Thanks for the info on the spindles, will definitely check that out thoroughly. I plan to inspect the machine first, then if I want to buy it, I'll have a tech inspect it before purchasing it. I've been researching both the Nexus and SQT 200MSY models. Is there a significant benefit to a Nexus over a SQT?
    I came across a few 200 Integrex for about 40k, while they don't fit my application, they are neat machines and I didn't know they sold for those prices. I was expecting 100k+, but I'm sure the tooling is what gets you.


    @Nagol I don't know if I need that feature for my application, but I'll look into it, thanks for the info.

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    Is there a significant benefit to a Nexus over a SQT?
    The Nexus and later Quick Turns have a control with Windows embedded, so they are more capable (extra memory, faster uploads/downloads, etc.) However, the hard drives are infamous for going bad on the Nexus machines, and that's a $2,000+ fix. Plus, the damn things take about 5 minutes to turn on or off.

    Mechanically, there is not much difference between an SQT and the Nexus QT's. In reality though, the older SQT's were probably built heavier and more robust than the newer machines.

    Remember, the live tooling for these older generation machines isn't very powerful, and is often limited in rpm capability. And the live-tool heads have to be rebuilt on a regular basis. Not an issue, as long as you're aware.

    Most of the SQT's have the T32 or T-Plus controls, and both are the most rock-solid of Mazak controls over the years (and power up/down in seconds, not minutes).

    Actually the T-Plus control uses the newer generation Mitsubishi main power supply and spindle/servo drives, so for ultimate reliability it is your best older Mazak control.

    Avoid older Integrexes, as they are very finicky, and can't take a crash without major realignment work.

    ToolCat

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    Quote Originally Posted by cnctoolcat View Post
    The Nexus and later Quick Turns have a control with Windows embedded, so they are more capable (extra memory, faster uploads/downloads, etc.) However, the hard drives are infamous for going bad on the Nexus machines, and that's a $2,000+ fix. Plus, the damn things take about 5 minutes to turn on or off.

    Mechanically, there is not much difference between an SQT and the Nexus QT's. In reality though, the older SQT's were probably built heavier and more robust than the newer machines.

    Remember, the live tooling for these older generation machines isn't very powerful, and is often limited in rpm capability. And the live-tool heads have to be rebuilt on a regular basis. Not an issue, as long as you're aware.

    Most of the SQT's have the T32 or T-Plus controls, and both are the most rock-solid of Mazak controls over the years (and power up/down in seconds, not minutes).

    Actually the T-Plus control uses the newer generation Mitsubishi main power supply and spindle/servo drives, so for ultimate reliability it is your best older Mazak control.

    Avoid older Integrexes, as they are very finicky, and can't take a crash without major realignment work.

    ToolCat
    Thanks for the info.

    Looks like I'll stick with a pre Nexus machine then.

    Do you know if options can still be purchased or added to the machines? Like the EIA option?

    I wouldn't abuse the live tooling, most of my live tool use will be done on 6061. Milling flats, some profiles, drill/tap 3/8"(10mm) threads max, and the occasional 1/8-1/4 NPT.

    Is the live tool rebuild based on hours or how hard you push them? How often do you rebuild yours and after how much use? I don't need concrete numbers, just trying to get an idea.

    I don't have a use for an Integrex, but good to know. I just think they are neat machines, especially after seeing Peter's Edge Precision videos.


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