Slide Lube Alarm - Oil Pressure Sensor
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  1. #1
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    Default Slide Lube Alarm - Oil Pressure Sensor

    Hey guys, I have a QT15 which is throwing a slide lube alarm and preventing me from running programs. If I disconnect this sensor (see image) the alarm goes away. The pump motor is running and if I manually pump the lube system it is definitely moving oil.

    Does anyone know where to source this sensor? I don't see any manufacturer's part no or labeling.


    Thanks!

    img_20200324_114057.jpg

  2. #2
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    From here, that looks like an automotive 2 wire oil pressure switch. You should be able to check it with an air hose and a continuity tester. If the switch is good chances are you have a way lube hose broken somewhere downstream.

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    Great tip, and unfortunately you are correct the sensor is fine...I will have to trace my oil lines.

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    Broken lube lines should be noticable, extra oil in coolant, or puddles on the floor.
    Many systems with broken lines will still seem work properly because the switch will momentarily operate at the start of the lube cycle.

    So the real question is does the switch work (doing it's job) and the pump is not pumping oil?

    Manually operating the pump means that it can pump oil,
    but there are several things than keep the motor from operating the pump.

    1. Worn out clock motor, runs but does not turn the output shaft.
    2. Some other worn out component between the motor and pump.

    So leave the switch out of the threaded port and run the pump for a half hour or so,
    or until more than a small drizzle of oil comes out.

    My vote is it's a pump issue and the switch is doing it's job, keeping you from running with no lube.
    In my experience, it is 10-20 times the pump and only once a switch, and when the complaint is oil in coolant or on the floor, it is a broken line.

    Many times the owner screws a switch into a port with the wrong thread (NPT vs BSPT) and causes more problems to fix later.

    Just my 2 cents,
    Bill

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    Those things have a manual knob for pumping? My machine has knob you pull for a few extra squirts upon start up. if the sensor is not reading press when you do that then it is definitely a line problem, otherwise you are lucky to have just clock or pump issues, maybe an O ring in the pump? NO juice to clock?

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    Have you changed the filter?


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