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  1. #181
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    New roller rails like on my doosan don't really have room for chips to get into.
    At first I was a bit worried about lack of cover as the previous model had X cover similar to mazaks, but now I see that other than being there to take the hit if something flies out aimed at the rail(very rare I'd think), there's likely no use for the cover other than packing up with chips like you got there.

  2. #182
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    More pics of the X rebuild, and machining the very case-hardened linear guide trucks to fit the adapter plates.

    Duct tape sealed up the bottom and ends of the trucks for machining.

    (I’m experimenting with “small size” upload via Tapatalk)


















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  4. #183
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    That;s interesting that you have an adaptor block between the truck and the upper casting.

    With this being the case, it would seem that it leaves a bit more opp porn tunity to go with different height rail sets.
    ???

    So then, I am at a loss.....
    What's the undercut in the adaptor all about?


    Also - I see that the upper casting is set for each truck to be doweled.
    Are you seriously dowling both rail - trucks?


    ---------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

  5. #184
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    Ox,

    The undercut in the truck adapters is clearance for the flexible way-cover strips.

    Remember, those infamous strips are fixed in position at the very bottom (front?) of the carriage, and run to the very top (rear?) of the carriage in the X-axis direction.

    The turret slides “above” the fixed strips through the undercut in the truck adapters — like a little tunnel.

    I told y’all it was a convoluted way cover system!

    (And Mazak still uses the same system on some machines!)

    The trucks are pinned to the adapter-spacer blocks only.
    The “dowel”holes you see in the bottom of the turret base are actually lube-oil passages!

    Mazak likes to lube the linear trucks through the castings, which obviously requires the trucks themselves to have custom lube ports drilled into them. (Yet one of the many, many ways Yamazaki tries to force you into buying their “custom” standard parts...)

    Well, it was a big pain enough drilling, tapping, and reaming the trucks, so rather than attempted to “gun-drill” lube holes through hardened linear guide trucks, I engineered a new lube-line system using the standard ports on the ends of the trucks. (More on that later....)

    And the 45mm series linear guides are standard 60 or 70mm total height. I stuck with the 60mm height, as the truck spacers are precision-ground for thickness, and I didn’t want to go monkeying with that!

    ToolCat

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  7. #185
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    I can guess how to solved the lube issue, but I'll wait....

    I don't know what's wrong with you friggin hillbillies.
    Can't just leave OEM alone - NO - you gotta go out and "improve" upon it....


    -------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

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  9. #186
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post
    I don't know what's wrong with you friggin hillbillies.
    Can't just leave OEM alone - NO - you gotta go out and "improve" upon it....


    -------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox
    Sometimes Jap engineering is like their words translated to English (Fanuc manuals come to mind), it just don't make any sense lol!

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  11. #187
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    More pics as the X-axis rebuild continues:

    I love the smell of new linear rails in the morning:



    All bolted down, with the plastic caps installed:



    The new trucks ride a little closer to the bottom of the rail, and of course the rail wedge plates were too thick! So, after skimming a little off the top (including the bolt heads), the new trucks barely clear:



    I used some nylon rope to hold the trucks into position, ready to set the turret back on.

    Notice how the front pair of trucks are the extended-length, heavy-load style, while the two rear trucks are standard length for 45mm series.

    Also, now you can visualize how the fixed way cover strips curve up and over the trucks — via the reliefs in the tops of the truck mounting plates:



    The trick with getting the turret back in is to rig it on the forks so it hangs as close to 45 degrees as possible, to match up properly with the trucks and ballscrew nut:



    Getting the turret lined up to the ballscrew-nut tang:



    And she’s in!



    Easing the rear trucks down into place:



    Next up, the new lube system, and re-engineering the way-cover strip mounts at the rear of the carriage.

    Why re-engineer them you ask?

    Well, the original way-cover strip mounts actually bolted to the rear of the linear rails, via holes that were drilled and tapped before the rails were hardened. (Yet another Yamazaki “customized” standard parts scam.)

    And since my new rails obviously have no end holes drilled/tapped, it could be a difficult solution...?

    For reference, here’s the way-cover strip mounts, the black bracket bolted to the original rail:



    Stay tuned for the hillbilly solution!
    Last edited by cnctoolcat; 04-03-2019 at 03:34 PM.

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  13. #188
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    Quote Originally Posted by cnctoolcat View Post
    Stay tuned for the hillbilly solution!
    Plug welds right?

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    Did you have a spotter or did you have to get on and off the lift 50 times?

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    Very nice rebuild, I wish you were rebuilding a little Mazak qt6, because I would want to buy it after you finished the rebuild, a Mazak 28, is too big for my shop.
    “Nut-tang” can you use that word in a sentence, without laughing?

  16. #191
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    Quote Originally Posted by chip_maker View Post
    Did you have a spotter or did you have to get on and off the lift 50 times?
    Good question! Yes, I was the spotter, my helper was on the forklift.

    It surprised the hell out of me, but we were able to drop the turret into place on the first try...and didn’t damage anything....including me!

    A big reason I had to rope the trucks into place was I didn’t want the ballscrew nut carrying all the weight of the turret, as the turret was lowered into place. If so, the screw was bound to get bent.

    The two rear trucks had to be uphill, just barely catching the rear of the turret. This was the only way to actually see the ballscrew nut for alignment.

    I used the forklift to hold most of the weight, until all four trucks were rolled into the correct position with bolts started, only then could I release the weight of the turret from the forks.

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  18. #192
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    Quote Originally Posted by cnctoolcat View Post
    Good question! Yes, I was the spotter, my helper was on the forklift.

    It surprised the hell out of me, but we were able to drop the turret into place on the first try...and didn’t damage anything....including me!

    ... and didn't haft'a git another divorce?



    ---------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

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  20. #193
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    So here’s how I did the X-axis way cover mounts:

    Mazak’s original NSK rails are 800 mm long, yet the standard-length THK’s I got were only 780 mm.

    Hmmm...

    It was easy enough to utilize the 10 mm distance off the top-end of the new rails, making brackets to hold the original way-cover mounts.

    The new brackets require drilling and tapping of the carriage casting, which ain’t bad as the meehanite machines really nice.

    I gained another 3 mm (why I am still in metric here...lol, .125”) by step-milling the Mazak mounts.

    This maximized the thickness of the new brackets, for the most bolt threads.

    It was important to locate the original way-cover mounts the same as original in all 3-axis’: X, “Y”, and Z.

    ...as the stainless way-cover strips are fixed-length, and have to snake their way through the narrow truck mount-spacer gaps to the front.












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    Isn't it possible to adapt an X-axis cover from a newer machine ?
    Like this type: $341.70 - MAZAK QS20N-4 AXIS-U CNC LATHE 33" X 18"...

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    This rebuild is Awsum. Nice work

  23. #196
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    Quote Originally Posted by Panza View Post
    Isn't it possible to adapt an X-axis cover from a newer machine ?
    Like this type: $341.70 - MAZAK QS20N-4 AXIS-U CNC LATHE 33" X 18"...
    Goood question!

    The design of the turret and carriage would have required a lot of work and modification,
    plus, to make it nice I would have to buy a custom set of telescoping covers, which are pricey.

    The original X-axis way cover system is definitely different, but it works well. And, the stainless strips are actually affordable from Mazak!

  24. #197
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    As mentioned prior, older Mazak’s linear guide trucks get their lube through the casting, into a port hole drilled into the truck.

    Rather than drill small, deep intersecting holes in the new trucks, I ran new lube lines externally to the trucks.

    The trucks have standard 1/8 BSPT ports on both ends, so it’s easy enough to use brass compression fittings and 5/32” tubing to get the job done.

    The biggest challenge was how to rout the new lube lines around those pesky stainless way cover strips.

    The rear trucks were easy, all I had to do was run the lines out toward the center and up to the manifold.




    For the front trucks, I was able to utilize a hole in the casting to sneak the lines up though, which allowed for the lines to clear the way cover strips by only 1/2” or so....just enough!

    I used wire ties to secure the lines in place, along with angling the fittings just right.

    In addition to using threadlocker on the brass tube fittings, I applied a little polyurethane caulk to insure they stay secure.




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  26. #198
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    Let’s continue with the turret re-assembly...

    I had noticed the original two front linear guide trucks had lengthwise notches in the upper corners. I didn’t think much about it, until I got to the point of bolting the carriage side plates and center cover plate on.

    Well, it appears Yamazaki has screwed me yet again!

    Those very notches in the original front trucks provide clearance for the side plates and center cover plate!

    What to do....??

    The irony here is the plates have shallow notches in them, for the stainless way cover strips to set down into. If I milled the plates and center cover to allow clearance for the new front trucks, the way cover strips would have no surface to rest on!



    Or would they....

    Upon close examination, I determined I could mill away about half of the way cover notches, providing just enough clearance for the front trucks, yet leaving barely enough shoulder for the way cover strips to rest on. (Take that Yamazaki!!)

    The front trucks come reaaaal close!





    I was able to leave the way cover notches full-width towards the bottom, as the turret doesn’t travel any father down. (Notice the wider milled edges just above each bellows, coming about 2/3rd’s of the way down):



    And to hedge my bets for the new way cover strips to remain in place on the narrower shelves, I actually installed the original way cover strips below the new strips, just stacking them!

    It turns out the total width of the resting “gap” was about 1/8” wider than the strip itself, so by shifting the stacked strips sideways from each other, I was able to completely fill the gap they rest in, helping to insure the strips didn’t drop down into the gaps.

    Plus by doubling up the way cover strips, the stacked strips are thicker and stronger, preventing any heavy chips from denting or penetrating them.



    Mazak wanted $400+ each for the linear guide bellows! Needless to say, that wasn’t going to happen.

    I first found some 45mm covers on eBay, which intuitively makes sense because the rails are 45mm size.

    BUT....

    The 45mm bellows would not fit down in the “tunnel” created by the side plates and center cover plate.

    What to do.....??

    On a hunch, I found some 35mm guideway bellows on EBay, and upon close examination figured out they might work! All I had to do was trim the inner plastic guide pieces, and the new 35mm covers fit like a glove.

    $35 versus $800... I call that a win!


  27. #199
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    So next up was a little work on the tool turret.

    The original coolant-piston face seal had worn away, and the brass piston had worn low areas around the coolant holes.



    So, I like to skim the rear of the turret, creating a fresh new surface for the coolant piston to seal against.



    I leave the innermost diameter at original height for a bit, to make a little edge that helps deflect any stray coolant away from the rubber turret seal, which protects the curvic coupling.

    The turret seal gasket wedges in the groove behind the coupling’s teeth. I sourced a new one from Mazak, since the original was 24 years old.CNCToolCat's Cat-House



    Then on to greasing and getting ready for assembly.





    A few years back I designed and machined an improved coolant piston for my QT’s. My piston has two sliding seals located inside the body, and the body has two seals on the outside diameter as well.

    Mazak’s design uses a piston that has only one sliding seal, and it doesn’t seal inside the outer fixed body, it seals inside the cast iron hole of the turret box.

    Well, over the years the hole gets “wallered out” (is that a term?CNCToolCat's Cat-House)by the brass piston, making it almost impossible to get a good seal between the hole and sliding piston.

    Notice how the original sliding seal is split:



    And here’s my design:



    The brass piston slides back and forth inside the stainless body, as the turret lifts about 3/8” of an inch to rotate:



    The body is locked into place with a cone-pointed set screw.

    The Mazak SQT-series turning centers of the 90’s use a hydraulically-shifted coolant piston (which can be prone to mix coolant and hydraulic fluid if the seals go bad), whereas the QT-series pistons are simply spring loaded.

    I use a board to slide the tool turret on, and a little muscle to get it up into place:



    And with the tightening of the big nut, we’re one step closer to mounting tools and taking test cuts:

    Last edited by cnctoolcat; 04-27-2019 at 08:15 AM.

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  29. #200
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    Before mounting all the tool holder blocks on the turret, I like to optimize them a bit: machining down excess weight, and creating room at the rear for through-the-tool coolant hookup.

    Here’s the factory Mazak blocks, with a 2” bore, they are mighty heavy:



    Later Mazak blocks are more cut-down, so I figured I wouldn’t lose rigidity by scalping mine:



    Removing part of the rear of the block, for the through coolant:



    I even got fancy and cut a pocket on the bottom side of the blocks, getting ‘em as light as practical:



    Lighter tool holder blocks save a ton (not literally...lol) of weight the 24-year old turret has to rotate hundreds of times a day:



    (A sharp eye will spot the two left-front blocks are factory-cast to the lighter design...I just shaved the tops a little.)

    Machining performance so far has shown the lighter mehanite blocks perform just as good as the original fat bastards, and I’m happy about that!

    Here they are installed (albeit with not all the bolts yet):



    On to a couple of custom tool holders for the turret...


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