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  1. #21
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    Here's the Toyota and saw. Notice drill press is only used for saw infeed table...


    Here's an earlier right side view, about 2004:


    Earlier left side view, around 2005. Showing 2nd QT15 I was rebuilding, before repaint:




    Here's the 20x30 offices/bathrooms/breakroom. (10 years now and still not finished!! ):


    More later...

    Greg

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  3. #22
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    how much later........

    Jason,

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  5. #23
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    OK, here's some action shots:
    (Notice in the last pic how I sometimes hold round parts in the 3-jaw, for machining on the side...)


    shop3-10-011.jpg
    img_3030.jpg
    img_3198.jpg
    img_3024.jpg
    img_2158.jpg

  6. #24
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    That Last shot is awesome, That is definately a cool setup

    Jason,

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  8. #25
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    Cool! How'd you make the jaw's in the last shot??

    brent

  9. #26
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    He just bored them out.

  10. #27
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    How'd you make the jaw's in the last shot??
    The #1 jaw is just flat on the end. #2 and #3 are "eyeballed" on the chuck, then taken to the vmc and each is mounted on a 60 degree angle, one at a time, in the Kurt vice. You have to have a stop established so both jaws locate the same. Then machine the diameter you need on each jaw, at the line you "eyeballed" while the jaws were in the chuck.

    Now granted, you better not get crazy with your rpms, as the part has the opportunity to be "sling-shotted" out of the jaws. But, the parts I do this way are usually heavy, so I don't need a lot of rpms. The part you see was spun at 500 rpms, for example.

    I have actually machined small, protruding steps at the top of jaws #2 and #3, to act as distinct "shoulders" to help make sure the parts stay in the chuck like they should.

    Now granted, if you need to hold exact position of a hole on the side of a round part, this method may not work. I can usually get the machined feature within +/- .010 on location, which is plenty good for features like hydraulic ports. That's what I was machining in this photo, a standard hydraulic port. Customer assumes threads are thread-milled. But, if they looked close enough, they could see the turn finish lines in the c-bore and taper. My little secret...

    Catman

  11. #28
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    Showing 2nd QT15 I was rebuilding, before repaint:
    How rude of me, to not show the QT15 after the paint job..

    backuppictures-293.jpg

    I actually scored this QT from HGR Surplus back in '05, with only seeing a picture and speaking to a salesman on the phone. (I know, I'm a gambling, goofy hillbilly asking for trouble...but I love a good cnc challenge)

    Well, on this QT, I kinda got bit on the ass. But remember, I bought her for a little bit more than scrap value, and had an identical twin already in the shop. She had no monitor, a bad monitor control board (which promptly fried the monitor from the other QT), a bad X-axis guideway, missing electrical fans, no coolant pump, and no chuck.

    I sent both monitor boards off to MEAU for rebuild. Actually was only about $500 for both...I was quite surprised. I had 2 new monitors in stock, that I had cabbaged off of Ebay. I picked up a new linear rail and trucks for the bad side of X (I know, shoulda done both while I had her apart, but I'm an idiot! She has worked fine for 6 years now though...)

    I just so happened to have an S-20 collet chuck with an A2-8 mount, once again scored from Ebay. Yes, turns out this QT15 is actually a QT15BB, with the 2.75" bar capacity, and A2-8 spindle. So, my bar-work chuck is installed.

    I added a chip conveyor, high-pressure pump, and cooling fans, sourced from you-know-where.

    I modified the factory parts catcher to my "save a man's back" design, with the parts box mounted on the door, and a chute, or funnel (Haas-like) to catch the parts and slide them down into the box. Both my QT15's have this custom mod, and it works like a dream. The biggest advantage for me, is that the parts catcher box rolls out of the way with the door.

    All Mazaks, even to this day, have the box mounted on the frame below the door. Fixed, where you have to work around the damn box the entire time you are setting up the machine!! The SQT I used to have had the box here, and lemme tell ya, what a PIA!!

    I proceeded to strip all sheetmetal off the QT, sand, prime, and then paint.

    She took a lot of work, a labor of love mind you, but the old girl just runs and runs.

    Catman

  12. #29
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    Nice place Sir! My shop looks very simular in design, Yours is much cleaner though! Now take some random pictures in the middle of the work week when you are busy as hell have every known tool in the shop laying out and every horizontal surface is covered with rags, paper, tools, parts Ect. At least then we would all know you are human!

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  14. #30
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    I can't see past the end of the quill in the 4th pic, is that a dead center your running? Next time I'm on my way to Bristol I'll have to stop and check this palace out!

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    What you see is a carbide-tipped dead center, but the 'ol Mazak QT20N has a built-in live center, inside the quill. So all you use is a dead #4 center.

    The shaft you see is a continuous mining machine cutter-drum driveshaft, made from pre-hard 4140. The finished part is about 44" long, I machine one half at a time, and polish the slight blend line.

    Now normally making a long shaft this way would result in a banana, instead of a straight part. But, I have a special technique where I pull the shaft out 40" (limit of machine), and turn 2 "spots", 1 near the middle, and 1 near the chuck.

    What's unique about my method is the chuck jaws are designed so the shaft can float radially at the tailstock end, thus when chucked the long bar mimics being between centers. By doing it this way, the 2 turned spots are concentric to each other, and to the center-drilled hole....irregardless of how crooked the bar stock is.

    I then use the midde turned spot to clamp on to machine the first half of the shaft. The other turned spot is used to face and center drill the 2nd side of the shaft, thus the 2nd side center-drilled hole is concentric to the machined 1st half of the shaft.

    Then, to machine the 2nd side, I clamp on the first half of the shaft using 2 split bushings (because the shaft is like a dogbone, with a large diameter at each end that must pass through the chuck jaws), and tailstock the other end. A quick polish of the blend line gets 'er done!

    This method results in a shaft well within the .010 TIR runout specs of the OEM, while allowing much improved metal removal rates, versus turning between centers with a steady rest.

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  17. #32
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    From an outsider's view, using the lathe to machine the port in the side of the part seems a little . What gives? Why no do it in the VMC? Drill, port tool, thd mill. I'm sure you have your reasons?

  18. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by david n View Post
    From an outsider's view, using the lathe to machine the port in the side of the part seems a little . What gives? Why no do it in the VMC? Drill, port tool, thd mill. I'm sure you have your reasons?
    In the photos I see one mill and like 5 lathes...My mill is pretty busy too so I would likely want to do the same.

    Charles

  19. #34
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    From an outsider's view, using the lathe to machine the port in the side of the part seems a little . What gives?
    Simply put, it was one of the many times in the shop I had more time than money! The order for the hydraulic ports was only 50 pcs, and the customer's price points don't allow for big wads of tooling allowance.

    For vmc processing, a port tool is $150, as is a small solid-carbide thread mill. That's $300 worth of tooling (if I don't break one, or both of them) for a job that may or may-not repeat. Since I had spun round parts like this before, and I had the lathe tooling to make the port on the shelf, it was a no-brainer at the time. Making the jaws was maybe 1.5 hours, otherwise setup and programming on the lathe was as quick as on the vmc.

    So, the pictured lathe setup cost me 1.5 hours additional shop time versus a vmc, but saved me $300 in tooling.

    Life in the job shop it is...

    The Catman

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  21. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by cnctoolcat View Post
    Simply put, it was one of the many times in the shop I had more time than money! The order for the hydraulic ports was only 50 pcs, and the customer's price points don't allow for big wads of tooling allowance.

    For vmc processing, a port tool is $150, as is a small solid-carbide thread mill. That's $300 worth of tooling (if I don't break one, or both of them) for a job that may or may-not repeat. Since I had spun round parts like this before, and I had the lathe tooling to make the port on the shelf, it was a no-brainer at the time. Making the jaws was maybe 1.5 hours, otherwise setup and programming on the lathe was as quick as on the vmc.

    So, the pictured lathe setup cost me 1.5 hours additional shop time versus a vmc, but saved me $300 in tooling.

    Life in the job shop it is...

    The Catman
    Been there. Done that.

  22. #36
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    How about some pics of some of the parts that pay the bills at the Cat House:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img_3224.jpg   backuppictures-272.jpg   backuppictures-295.jpg   img_3230.jpg   img_2603.jpg  


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  24. #37
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    Good stuff! The second and 4'th pictures look like cylinder pistons. Is that right?

  25. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by cnctoolcat View Post
    How about some pics of some of the parts that pay the bills at the Cat House:
    Whoa! That is some easy jobs! Do you get a lot of "easy" work like that?

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    Customer allowed mill finish for the flange OD on the bushings (photo3) and meant it?

    But if this is mining gear, they must figure on rust and dings pretty much soon as it gets installed anyway.

  27. #40
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    2nd pic is hydraulic cylinder piston, about 8" OD, with tolerances of +-.001 on critical diameters, and surface finishes of 125 or better. ID thread was about 2" I think.

    4th pic is housing for chain hoist clutch. OD of housing is threaded....kinda unusual part design.

    3rd pic shows 1st op only. 2nd op finishes "head" on mining bit bushings. Made from 4140, heat treated to Rc 50-54, then hard turned on OD to +/-.0005.

    Long shafts in 1st pic get the ends hobbed on 1 of 2 Barber Colman 16-16's I found through the 'ol fav site, Ebay. They were Caterpillar surplus machines, and I got them for a tad above scrap price. A little tuning here and there, and both cut excellent splines!

    Yes, about 80% of shop work is lathe work. That's why we have 6 cnc lathes vs. 2 cnc machining centers.

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