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  1. #21
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    Thanks guys. Glad your enjoying the photos. As you can tell, we are a job shop. We can machine alot of different things, especially one off parts that some of the other local shops wont mess with. Plus many of our customers know that they can depend on me to get something done quickly if needed. We have many long time customers who depend on us to do the repairs needed, such as the local wastewater companies, electric motor shops, and companies with alot of big construction equipment or machinery. We also get alot of private individuals that come in with work needing machine work. I really enjoy what I do, and Im thankfull my dad and grandad were in the buisness before me. They built one great machine shop to work out of.
    It seems the older I get the more Ive come to respect the older machines and tools. Sometimes I find something burried in a cabinet or in a corner that I didnt even relize we have. Often I find tools that I still dont know what they are used for. I'll have to take some pictures of these and post them on here soo that some of the veteran guys can shine some light on.
    One such tool that I'd love to know more about is the Watts Floating Chuck. We have one but dont have any of the tooling that you use with it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by matthew_g View Post
    Please keep posting, I really enjoy your photo's. I love getting to look into other peoples workshops especially when they are on the other side of the world where you would normaly never get to see..I wish you luck with your business.
    Matt
    I was reading the replies to my comedian wife and she got excited when she heard where you live...LOL Shes been watching a Showtime show based in Austrailia called Satisfaction. She loves the accents from other countries.

  3. #23
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    We also have done several tiller arm and other boat related jobs. These pics are of a pair of tiller arms and center link that I custom built for a customer who bought a new commercial fishing boat and wanted to beef up the steering parts. I used 304 stainless and purchased the clevis' and pins from a local marine supply. Also, notice the welds. I used a stainless flux-core wire on my mig welder.






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    Default Very Nice

    Nice shop abom79,
    I have enjoyed reading your posts and seeing the pics of your machines and work. Keep em coming.
    toolles

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    Yep, Great looking shop. You have some awsome machines. Love that borer

    Keep the updates coming!

    Subscribed.

  7. #26
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    Thanks again for the comments. Glad to share my work and interests with other machinists.
    Ive machined many prop shafts over my time, and my dad has built them for years. We're in a coastal area (Im sure everyone heard about the BP oil spill, yea that area) and theres alot of commercial fisherman who need parts mad e or repaired. We've done alot of different things for these guys, although I dont have pictures of them all.

    Heres a twin pair of shafts I machined.



    I actually ment to post these pics with pictures from the custom tiller arm job. I replaced the rudder shafts cause the old ones were wore out and bent.






    Welded using stainless flux core.




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  9. #27
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    So are there any of you that do Metalizing? Or "spray welding". My dad finally taught me how to do this a few years into working with him. Its such a great and easy way to fix worn bearing or seal journals on shafts. This is a technique I use very often for alot of the electric motor repair jobs, and pump shafts. I also have a brand new set-up like this built by Thermo-Dyne at my day job at Motion Ind. There we rebuild gear boxes and many of the shafts need the seal journals metalized. So heres some pics of a pump shaft I fixed.
    Also notice in the pics the lathe. This is my favorite lathe we own. Its an 86 model Victor 16x60. Its such and easy to use good cutting lathe. I would recommend owning one of these for anyone.


    Undercut and ready to spray.





    Welded and ready to machine. Just use a good sharp brazed on carbide tool. I usually have to touch it up a couple times before finishing to size.



    Turned and polished.


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    Abom79,

    Really like the pics.....You and I have a lot in common, I also do hydraulics.....the spray welding/metalizing I purchased 20 odd yrs ago just collects dust.....Eutectic, the cold and hot method spray.....

    Unlike you, I didn't have anyone to show me how to use this stuff and the salesmen disappeared after the sale.......I had a few local competitors use the thermal spray coatings but I only used it when backed against a wall....

    Originally intended for restoring hydraulic shafts, I gave up on it due to the smoke/fumes and nasty clean up on the lathe.....Yukkkk.....it just became easier to just make a new shaft.....done....

    I like your clever ways to handle large shafts, that 5000#er was spooky for sure......

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    E-fishin-c,

    Its funny what you said about the spray welding, its the same stuff my dad said about it and why he had quit using it years ago too. I remember for a few years I kept asking him what the metal powders were for and how it was used. He kept saying it made a mess and was harmfull to breath in. But I didnt give a damn. I told him I wanted to use it and Im glad I bugged him about it. Since then I use it almost weekly at both jobs. And Id much rather use it than to weld up a shaft, or make a new one. Of course unless the shaft just needs to be replaced because of it being too badly damaged. Honesly I dont think anyone else in the area still uses this technique.
    I'll try and get my co-worker at Motion to take some pics of the Thermo-Dyne torch I use there. Its actually a more effecient torch IMO.

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    Thanx, I'd appreciate that......my only problem with the spray stuff was with me, I'd overheat it, or underheat it, or not undercut properly.....I never blamed the equipment....I just couldn't get over the learning curve to suit me...Experience is always the best teacher (or your Dad)

    and back then my lathes were older and not as valuable.....I wouldn't let that stuff near mine now.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by e-fishin-c View Post
    Thanx, I'd appreciate that......my only problem with the spray stuff was with me, I'd overheat it, or underheat it, or not undercut properly.....I never blamed the equipment....I just couldn't get over the learning curve to suit me...Experience is always the best teacher (or your Dad)

    and back then my lathes were older and not as valuable.....I wouldn't let that stuff near mine now.....
    I hear ya. Thats why I always lay down a fiberglass welding cloth to protect the ways when I spray. You stil getl a little dust on the machine but I always wipe and blow it off. Do you have the same Eutectic set-up I use? If you ever want some advice on the technique and want to give it another try just let me know. I dont mind helping out when I can.

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    Very cool and homey shop and little on the wild side with everything you need to do a job. I was at Bay Ship Yard in San Fran last month and saw a HUGE American lathe very,very slowly turning what looked to be a steel prop shaft around 12 inches in diameter and probably 18 feet long.The prop and shaft crew has a big wire feed MIG welder located on the tool post/compound and it was laying down build up filler on the shaft where the cutlass bearings had worn the shaft. The lead screw was engaged like doing threading...it was just doing its thing unattended as the guys were on break....

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  17. #33
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    Thanks again for allthe great comments guys. The shop has been well tooled over the years. I mentioned before that my grandad bought alot of things from goverment surplus. Well he was the machine shop foreman on Pensacola NAS for years before he retired. I sopose back in those days there was alot of good used tooling that the goverment sold. He brought home alot of good used machine shop tools from the base. I have a huge supply of taper shank drills, up to 3", hand, machine, and taper shank reamers even alot of shell mill reamers, and countless other tools that would take thousands of dollars in todays time to replace. I love all the old well worn in hand tools like our old Greenfield tap handles, and things you just cant find these days. Theres one cabinet thats slap full of Williams and Armstrong tool holders of all sizes. A few we use daily, but most of the others were collected over the years and used on the old shaper and lathes from way back. Even some of our mics are very old. I want to take pictures of some of them and post them up.
    I'm very proud of what my dad and grandad worked soo hard to build. I hope that I can keep the shop going for a long time even though Im down to part time. This bad economy really took a toll on the buisness.

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    Great shop. I'm just a hobby machinist myself, but I really enjoy reading your posts. Great work and keep the pictures coming.

    Jeff

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    Nice shop. I always enjoy seeing American Ingenuity at its finest.

    We repair some parts with spray weld as well. We don’t, but we ship it to someone who does. It’s sometimes cheaper than scrapping the part and starting over.

    I had a couple questions on your technique. What kind of rpm do you run? Is it a SFPM or just a seat of the pants kind of thing? If I recall correctly, we have them lay down about .015” to .025”. (It can get pretty pricey.) How much to you lay down and how long does it usually take.

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    [QUOTE=kakkeef2;1525668]Nice shop. I always enjoy seeing American Ingenuity at its finest.

    We repair some parts with spray weld as well. We don’t, but we ship it to someone who does. It’s sometimes cheaper than scrapping the part and starting over.

    I had a couple questions on your technique. What kind of rpm do you run? Is it a SFPM or just a seat of the pants kind of thing? If I recall correctly, we have them lay down about .015” to .025”. (It can get pretty pricey.) How much to you lay down and how long does it usually take.[/QUOTEs ]

    I have the original handbooks and guide that came with the torch. But my dad showed me how to do it. Theres a few things you have to do correctly in order for it to work. As for rpm's, it just depends on the diameter of the shaft. Most of the shafts I repair are anywhere from 1"-3" od. Anywhere from 150-350 rpm will work fine. I usually run 3o0-380 depending on what lathe Im in. Before spraying mask the areas next to where you want to build up. You can use Dykem lay-out dye as you can tell from my pics, or use the actual masking compound. Undercut the area to be sprayed anywheres from about .015"-.040". Also cut a shallow fine thread. I always use the threading tool to both undercut and thread. Once machined pre-heat area to 200 degrees. I have temp sticks to determine once your there. Once its hot enough, let the powder in the mix, keeping 6-8" away from the shaft. I always build up to about .050" over the finish size. After Ive sprayed it, i cool it with a fan till I can hold my hand on the shaft. Then just machine to size using a sharp carbide tool. I leave 1 or 2 thousanths over finish size and hand file and polish down. Once you get it to spec you can use to 400 grit, then some grey scotch-bright to polish it up nicely. Also, when your spraying yout not soposed to get the shaft over 600 degrees. If it gets too hot just back off till it cools down to between 200 and 600.
    Hope this helps.

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  22. #37
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    Ive been searching through all my photos albums trying to find some more good pics to show. Heres a few of another fun job I did.







    Heres a few more prop shafts.







  23. #38
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    How about a break from work for a minute! Any Malibu guys out there?? Heres a weekend toy I built a few years back.



    The most exciting thing I ever mail ordered!





    Took this video after I had the new exhaust installed.


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    Adam,

    You certainly have mastered the quote...."Work Hard, Play Hard".....

    Nice Wheels...........sometimes you need distractions from work to enjoy life

  25. #40
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    Thanks fishin! Your right. Theres got to be other things in life you can enjoy besides your day job. I really love old cars and hot rods. The 78-87 G-body Malibus have always been one of my favorites. Unfortunetly the past year and a half I havnt got to do anything with the car. You know your never really done when you think your done...right?

    I did build my own lower trailing arms. Guess I was just lucky enough to have a machine shop at my disposal.



    I had the perfect size rectangluar tubing laying around. So I cut them to length, drilled holes to rough size in the old drill press, them finished boring them in the mill for new bushings.










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