My new shed build (Australia) - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    So we are now getting close to were things are up to today.

    Next job was grouting under the posts once everything was tightened up. I had drilled a hole in centre of plates to allow me to pour the grout in from the centre as well as from the sides. Just made a flowable mix and poured it in and made sure it flowed to all corners. Made a dam to hold the grout with some angle iron siliconed to the cement.

    img_2011.jpg

    img_2033.jpg

    Mark

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    So now it is time to turn our attention to the crane. When we picked it up and had to cut it to fit on the truck I cut it so it would be longer than the width of the shed. That way would not need to join the main beam just weld the end section back on. First thing I needed to do was move the crane into the shed so I could work on it safely (and not set the paddock on fire). To make this easier I decided to make some forklift tyne extensions. I have a 12 tonne forklift but it only had 6 ft tynes and the crane is 8 ft wide. So I fabricated some 9ft tyne extensions. I could have brought a ste but they wanted $5000 Australian for a pair!

    img_1745.jpg

    img_1743.jpg These things are super heavy duty. Need a front end loaded to move them.


    Mark

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    Your already finished by the sounds of it and just posting the progress as it happened.

    I used this product Called Aircell insulation its a gold foil colour one side and silver aluminium colour the other with a bubble wrap like air cell in the middle.
    it works great, but maybe not as good as cool room insulation.
    I think this was it here https://roofingsupermarket.com.au/in...resh-5061.html but maybe i am remembering it wrong as i thought the gold colour was a bit brighter and more shiny from what's shown on the website.
    so maybe a different brand.

    you also may want to look into pressure washing and sealing the concrete so oil etc doesn't soak in and so it is easy to clean

    Some people don't like it but i do makes it easy to mop a section of the floor for it to be back to being nice. maybe a bit nicer than a typical farm shed with dirt floor or what your used to.

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    So now I can move the crane pieces into the shed to work on. Will need to cut/carbon arc gouge the end off the short piece, then cut the longer piece to size before welding the end back on. Need to be careful as all 4 wheels need to in a level plane so they all take equal weight.

    img_1746.jpg Unwrapping the crane

    img_1747.jpg

    img_1748.jpg

    img_2058.jpg Well balanced load

    img_2063.jpg

    So this is where I am up to now. Will update this thread as things happen. Be as patient as I have been because things move slowly.
    Once the shed is finished I will start moving my machines in. They will need cleaning/levelling and setting up which I will document as I go. I have some interesting/rare machines that I hope you will enjoy as much as I do. This workshop will be my retirement home/interest and will primarily be for restoring old tractors/large stationary engines/lathes and other engineering equipment. I have never been into CNC/3D printers so it will be totally old school only.
    So will post things as I go and hopefully some pictures if I remember.

    Cheers for now

    Mark

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  6. #45
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    This is for a 5 ton cap crane ???
    I erected a building once with a 6 ton crane and about 20 mtr span
    It used about a quarter of the steel per meter
    The rail was just 50x30mm with a bit rounded top welded to the HEA250 ( I think) beams
    Beams were full lenghts and flanged together The rail a bit of a overlapp
    Way way overkill IMHO
    This is enough steel for a 20 ton crane

    Peter

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    Amazing build so far! Looking forward to seeing the rest of it!

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    You've done a lot of work, sir. If you don't mind a suggestion, epoxy coat the concrete floor now. Worth every penny to keep oil out of the concrete, easier to clean up and keeps dust down. Question- I understand just less than 40 foot crane span? What is the height of ceiling? Trying to guess how much height you have under hook. Get as much as you can!

    For Peter in Holland, I think the OP memtioned getting the steel as more or less scrap. You take what you can get, unless you want to pay new prices.

    Regards,
    Lucky7

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    good to see someone else backs me up on coating the floor, its much nicer to work in a nice clean shed which is also easy to clean.
    In 40 years a uncoated concrete floor is very filty with all the grime that sticks to it, i have seen it before.

    But a coated one will look great.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter from Holland View Post
    This is for a 5 ton cap crane ???
    I erected a building once with a 6 ton crane and about 20 mtr span
    It used about a quarter of the steel per meter
    The rail was just 50x30mm with a bit rounded top welded to the HEA250 ( I think) beams
    Beams were full lenghts and flanged together The rail a bit of a overlapp
    Way way overkill IMHO
    This is enough steel for a 20 ton crane

    Peter
    Hi Peter

    I totally get what you are saying.
    There are 3 ways to build a shed.
    The first way is to erect a kit shed. These are very common if you just need a storage shed/simple workshop shed. They come with plans and can be erected pretty simply. A neighbour put one up recently a similar size to my shed. 5 blokes turned up with it and had it completed in 3 days. But they are definitely built to a price with everything being minimal standard and really pretty flimsy. The whole shed only weighed a few tonnes. Really only designed to last a generation or two max. Unfortunately they are not set up to do heavier industrial sheds especially with cranes.
    The second way is how most industrial sheds are built. These sheds are normally built in town and require all the usual government development consents, have to meet all required standards and comply with all worksafe laws. You employ an engineering company who do the ground surveys, structural engineers calculate all the stresses, static and dynamic crane loads, beam bending moments etc and calculate the required steel for posts,trusses etc. These plans then go to the fabrication company who makes all the steel components out of new steel. You then employ a building company who erects the shed based on the engineers plans. This results in a good shed which meets all requirements for the various government oversight departments. But it is still built with the minimal sized components that meet the relevant safety margins as no one wants to pay more than they have to. I visited a number of these sheds prior to building mine and was a little shocked to see the small size of some of the crane holding components. Having said that todays mono cranes are engineered very light weight.
    The third way is definitely the road less traveled. It is generally only taken by farmers who live in areas where there is no to very limited oversight to what is built. No local government development application is required. Provided you have no employees even OHS oversight is minimal. So you can build what you want with whatever material you want. As long as you think its safe and fit for purpose that is okay. So with a bit of common sense, some study of standards, checking out other sheds you are right to go.
    The benefit of this way is you can look for suitable second hand components to incorporate into the shed to reduce cost. In Australia new structural steel runs at about $2000/tonne ($1400USD) so for a shed like this the cost is significant. I did look at getting a structural engineer to plan things but when he found I wanted to use second hand steel, second hand crane which needed rewelding by a non certified welder he completely lost interest. For $10000 he would look at my plans to make sure I wasnt making any big mistakes but no signature or certification. Obviously I didn't take him up on his offer.
    It is amazing what you can find if you look. I knew roughly the minimum sized posts,crane rails etc that I needed so I just looked for that or bigger. The crane I got for free (he advertised it for $10 but didn't take it when I turned up). It came from a large port container business who were doing some remodelling and it was surplus to requirements. It was in the way and he just wanted it gone. He had tried to get some scrap companies to take it but they all wanted big money to take it away because it needed to be cut up first just to fit on semi trailer. The big posts were left over from a multi storey carpark build. The ten posts cost about 10 percent of new price. The big crane rails came from a crane business I just happened to drive past. They had taken the contract to pull down a big shed which had a 20 tonne crane in it and they were selling off some bits surplus to their requirements. Again, bigger than I needed but cheap. So then you design the shed around what you have. I also consider it a learning exercise which is very interesting.

    I hope this gives you some context to why I have built the shed the way I have

    Cheers

    Mark

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    Quote Originally Posted by Street View Post
    good to see someone else backs me up on coating the floor, its much nicer to work in a nice clean shed which is also easy to clean.
    In 40 years a uncoated concrete floor is very filty with all the grime that sticks to it, i have seen it before.

    But a coated one will look great.
    Hi Street,

    What product would you use and is it is to apply? Are they slippery when wet?

    Cheers

    Mark

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    I missed the window to coat my floors before I had to fill the buildings up with equipment and the rest of life. I considered many of the coatings and it seemed like the poly ureas were generally tougher and would adhere better than the epoxies did. But the caveat was always prep and installation conditions. Cut corners or mess things up and you will have big issues. I also heard about concrete densifiers which were interesting but I have no firsthand experience with. This is one of them that was recommended to me Home - Ashford Formula Ashford Formula

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    Shed looks really good, I am doing almost the exact same thing.
    Something else to look into instead of a painted floor is a diamond polished floor. This uses a densifier to soak into the concrete and bind it together and make it very hard, this is so the diamonds can cut it, polish it also if you want to. The concrete having had the densifier soaked into it does not dust off anymore. Looks good, better than paint IMHO. You still should put sealer on it, preferably one that soaks in rather than clear paint that sits on top.

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    Cannot recall what i used for the last one i did, it was a building going into retail, so lots of foot traffic.
    I did a concrete grind on it as well beforehand then a pressure wash let it dry then rollered on the product.
    The grind was to clean up the slab and make it look respectable.

    I think it was a two pack epoxy product.

    Yes the downside is if the floor when wet it can be slippery, but to mop it up clean is as easy as mopping your lino in the house. when dry is ok to walk on.

    Have a look at concrete grinding companies and see what they are using.

    Sheds on farms can get dusty, dust and machine tools don't mix so well so also look into sealing the gaps on corrugated sheets ( on joins ) and down at side where it meets ground. But you may need vents when doing some things so be careful of a fully sealed shed re fumes/ gases

    I really like working in a clean shed so the easier you make it to clean the better and people appreciate clean...also if someone else owns the property later on.
    The shed should outlast you, the concrete if the mix has enough cement in it will more than outlast the shed many times over.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mark123 View Post
    Hi Peter

    But it is still built with the minimal sized components that meet the relevant safety margins as no one wants to pay more than they have to. I visited a number of these sheds prior to building mine and was a little shocked to see the small size of some of the crane holding components. Having said that todays mono cranes are engineered very light weight.

    Cheers

    Mark
    Those safety margins for a crane are pretty high It is your unexperience that makes them look small
    Its only a 5 ton crane That isnt that much
    But I know what you mean. I have done that kind of things too but in a much smaller scale
    Good luck with the building

    Peter

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    Based on my experience, which was well researched at the time ten years ago, recommend two pack epoxy for floor with a *very good* acid scrub first. Holding up well in a typical, abusive to floor, shop environment. Not slippery.

    L7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter from Holland View Post
    Those safety margins for a crane are pretty high It is your unexperience that makes them look small
    Its only a 5 ton crane That isnt that much
    But I know what you mean. I have done that kind of things too but in a much smaller scale
    Good luck with the building

    Peter
    Hi peter,

    On this build ínexperience' is my middle name. The option of putting a 10 tonne manual lift on the crane beam may come in handy later. Look forward to doing some test lifts once the crane goes up.

    Cheers

    Mark

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    Quote Originally Posted by lucky7 View Post
    Based on my experience, which was well researched at the time ten years ago, recommend two pack epoxy for floor with a *very good* acid scrub first. Holding up well in a typical, abusive to floor, shop environment. Not slippery.

    L7
    Thanks for that. This seems to be what I am leaning towards but there is a bewildering array of products in this space. Won't do anything till the building is complete so got a few more months to check out the options.

    Mark


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