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  1. #201
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    Quote Originally Posted by alskdjfhg View Post
    I think the funniest part is that the 25 year old would be 5 years older than I am.....
    Not funny at all. Started dating twenty-somethings at 15. Until.. you can find a woman as can keep up with and challenge an intellect, may as well enjoy the company of one who has outgrown the head-games silliness and sorted out the biology and hygiene stuff to a better standard.

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    20 years old! Wow, I knew you were pretty young but I think you give new meaning to the phrase 'old head on young shoulders'. I like the low risk diverse approach too. In most things ime, providing the markets there and you turn out good work, it doesn't take long for work to come your way, just don't forget to have a new cable on that overhead .


    PS: Bald is beautiful!

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    Quote Originally Posted by alskdjfhg View Post
    I don't want to sound like a jerk, I'm not an expert, and don't expect them to be either. But good lord, there is a certain level that youd think would be obvious. I can't make it without any dimensions...
    People who have never made anything don't understand. I've come to decide that good drawings are non-obvious. It is too bad that it sounds like the students aren't making parts as part of FSAE. That is kind of the point of the program. Making a drawing, then having to go back to CAD 12 times to pull more dimensions because you forgot to dimension features is a good learning opportunity. It also takes away the "know it all" conflict, when the only person you have to blame is yourself.

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  5. #204
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    I think this is typical of the up coming engineering and manufacturing groups that are trying to eliminate drawings and go directly from the model to a part. This is the method that was used by our design and model shop using ProE, a preprocessor and then directly to the milling machine. The shop didn't want drawings.

    Tom

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  7. #205
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    This is the "print" they finally sent.

    As much as I'd like to help them, I think is gonna be more work than it's worth.

    I'm sure there are probably only a couple of dimensions that actually matter, all others could probably be made with files and die grinders, but I don't think I'm in the mood to go though and figure out what's important and what's not over email.

    Looks like the PM picture upload thing is on the fritz again, lowered the size and quality a lot.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails screenshot-1-.jpg  

  8. #206
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    I worked on campus at our local university for 11 years and I was always getting drug into student projects in metal, wood and plastics. We have a pretty sweet college of technology with everything from a high class foundry, fully equipped plastic lab with injection molding, blow molding and thermoforming and roto molding, the machine shop is probably the least equipped but still has all the standards manual and cnc. The wood area has the latest with 5 axis router, 4 axis router, cnc panel saw and edgebander, vertical machining center along with all the high end manual flow through machines like 6 head molders etc.

    Anyway, I only say that because with all the machines it made the kids dream up projects to do and many times I ended up in the middle of them as I was the guy that ran the cnc wood shop, but my degree and work before that was manufacturing eng, so I knew the metal side as well. I also had outside customer projects that I made molds and tooling for the thermoformer so I learned how to setup and run the thermo former.

    What I found out was that I had to train the instructors before I got anywhere with the kids. Many of the instructors had only had a job when they were in school and never worked for real outside in a manufacturing facility with the real world requirements. Once I got the instructors to realize what info I needed to go forward with a job it helped speed things up and I could then train them on feasibility of making the part. There were still times that I had to train the kids as to what I specifically needed for a part because it really wasn't in the wheelhouse of their instructor, but it wasn't bad.

    It took me a long time to realize that almost all of these students weren't like me, they didn't have an innate ability to see how things are made or have the experience of making things to know to use standard tooling, fasteners and material where possible. I had to change my own way of thinking to figure out that most instructors and students just don't get it when it comes to actually making something and while it is aggravating, it is the way it is and most times these people have talents in other areas.

    Most people aren't like us in playing with machines, tools etc when we are kids and have an appetite for figuring out how things work. and making things from scratch. When I got into the university I had already went through a 2 year program in manufacturing, so I was working in a machine shop with some experience when I walked into these classes with kids that had never seen any of these machines or tools until their picture popped up on the overhead. FSAE was after me, so we did a moon buggy for our senior project. There was one team in my class that had made it though their 4 year program without having ever turned on a lathe or mill or welder. They didn't get their buggy done. My team had a kid that worked in a pattern shop in high school, one in a weld shop and me who farmed before working the machine shop. We got ours done and did well.

    I think you will find that even most people older than you aren't going to understand what info you need to make something...even after you tell them.

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  10. #207
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    One of the most important aspects of design is to determine what is important to a part and what isn't. That means that the designer has to analyze the design for fits and tolerances and not just say "all the dimensions are important" as I have heard some engineers, not very good ones, say. Perhaps you need to set down with the students and explain that, if you have the time.

    Tom

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  12. #208
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    I said I'd meet with those FSAE guys on Monday to suggest some changes to take their parts from insane to easy.

    Got more machines wired in (sort of temporarily). Tested the 2MH, all the speeds and feeds work, but couldn't get the rapids to engage. But it works enough for me right now.

    The 24" pacemaker runs aswell. It was setting outside protected for who know how long before I got it, with an open electrical panel. Used two solenoid switches to control the motor, one for forward one for reverse. They had correced to the point where the would not move. A little penetrating oil, gentles pokes and taps got them moving.

    The reverse switch still likes to stick, and both arc a far amount. Think I'll have to take them apart and clean them up to get them running good.

    I found it funny that even the electrical stuff on this WWII lathe was fixable with a hammer...

    Took the headstock cover off the Hendey to see what the gearbox looked like. Think I'm going to have to take the headstock apart, noticed that a key on the main gear shaft was very sloopy and loose. It's retained in by a cap head keeper, but that appears to be stripped. Also seems like the lathe is stuck in two gears at the same time.

    Also took the 440v only motor off the HBM. Gonna start working on it between working on other stuff.

    But the most amazing is that the CNC lathe seems to be alive. Ran power to it, and it did stuff. Hydraulic pump came on, turret moved and some error codes came up. I didn't get it to do that, Mark did that, he's got more CNC experience than I do.

    I took some pictures of the screens that showed up, most I don't really understand. But it seems to have part of a program loaded on it, as well as the machine parameters.

    But seems like this thing might have some life in it yet. Think I'm going to try and find a tech that would want to come and take a look at this thing.

    Ya'll have any ideas on those error codes. Also found a loose wire and electrical component lose in one of the pannels.




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    I don't have any experience or really any knowledge of the OT control, I do have an OM, the mill control on my machine and those errors look similar to mine at first power up. I hit reset and they will go away. Has Mark been able to home out the machine? You may need to look for E stops and door switches, see if they are activated etc. Does this machine need air? Do you have rotation correct? I think the easiest way to tell is the hyd pump.

    I'd post this in the cnc section, I bet they know exactly what those error codes are. They'll want to know the exact model of the machine and year, everything you can give them to help diagnose it.

    Did you get any books on it? I am sure you can find the Fanuc OT programming manual online, but machine specific books are needed for everything else.

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    Quote Originally Posted by macgyver View Post
    I don't have any experience or really any knowledge of the OT control, I do have an OM, the mill control on my machine and those errors look similar to mine at first power up. I hit reset and they will go away. Has Mark been able to home out the machine? You may need to look for E stops and door switches, see if they are activated etc. Does this machine need air? Do you have rotation correct? I think the easiest way to tell is the hyd pump.

    I'd post this in the cnc section, I bet they know exactly what those error codes are. They'll want to know the exact model of the machine and year, everything you can give them to help diagnose it.

    Did you get any books on it? I am sure you can find the Fanuc OT programming manual online, but machine specific books are needed for everything else.
    Pretty sure it's wired up right, but that's something to double check. Was low on hydraulic oil and way oil, added both to the machine.

    Don't think it needs air, could not find any sort of hook up where they air would go. Think the chuck is hydraulic.

    And no Mark could only get the turret to rotate.

    I'd post over in the CNC, but don't really know how to describe what I'm looking at. Unknown exact year, don't have any literature with the machine.

    The guy I bought my small forklift was a Fanuc tech and has a business repairing Fanuc CNC machines. Was going to give him a call this week and see if he did service calls. Mark knew a guy who recommended another guy whos a CNC tech, also gonna give him a call.

    Think calling a tech might be the best way, I'm afraid to do more damage than go poking around without know what I'm doing.

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  17. #211
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    Quote Originally Posted by alskdjfhg View Post
    Pretty sure it's wired up right, but that's something to double check. Was low on hydraulic oil and way oil, added both to the machine.

    Don't think it needs air, could not find any sort of hook up where they air would go. Think the chuck is hydraulic.

    And no Mark could only get the turret to rotate.

    I'd post over in the CNC, but don't really know how to describe what I'm looking at. Unknown exact year, don't have any literature with the machine.

    The guy I bought my small forklift was a Fanuc tech and has a business repairing Fanuc CNC machines. Was going to give him a call this week and see if he did service calls. Mark knew a guy who recommended another guy whos a CNC tech, also gonna give him a call.

    Think calling a tech might be the best way, I'm afraid to do more damage than go poking around without know what I'm doing.
    You should post your questions in the CNC forum. Doesn't matter what year it is. It's an OT Fanuc with servo errors. Just post up what you know and ask questions.

  18. #212
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    If the turret worked, then the hydraulics must be right.

    I agree that you likely need air, however that's not going to address your axis faults. But homing it may clear those.


    ------------

    ThInk Snow Eh!
    Ox

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    That loose wire is just a capacitor that goes across the contactor coil and snaps in the front of the contactor where the label normally goes. It just cuts down on the noise generated by the coils when they cycle.

    Seems like a servo drive voltage issue? I'll look again later.

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    The no spindle VRDY means the spindle drive is not ready to run, if you are lucky it might be a case of pressing a reset button on the drive. I have had those other two alarms on mine ,can't remember how I got rid but it was nothing serious.

    Of all the controls you could have the Fanuc OT is probably with more help on here than most.

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    What kind of drives doo you have? Are they in a yellow plastic box, or open structure?

    And those are "red cap" motors too right?


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    Quote Originally Posted by sable View Post
    The no spindle VRDY means the spindle drive is not ready to run, if you are lucky it might be a case of pressing a reset button on the drive. I have had those other two alarms on mine ,can't remember how I got rid but it was nothing serious.

    Of all the controls you could have the Fanuc OT is probably with more help on here than most.
    That's encouraging.

    I started a new thread for this machine over in the CNC fourm. Been very helpful, I think I'm going to spend some time on it this weekend just cleaning and getting better pictures.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post
    What kind of drives doo you have? Are they in a yellow plastic box, or open structure?

    And those are "red cap" motors too right?


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    I got no idea, have to check the machine again. The Z servo has a red cap on in.

    Posted a picture of the internals on the drive/hydraulic side in the other thread. Might answer that questions.

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    The last few weeks have really been a mess. Seems like one disaster after another, schools the main reason. Spring brake is a week away, be nice to get a week off.

    Had a minor melt down this morning. Got a zero on my finite events exam (class averadge was a 12.5), and couldn't figure out how to do the extra credit he offered and I was super stressed. A song Id never heard before came on the radio and for some reason I started thinking about Dad and ended up crying in car. Its never easy to drive down to the farm, those long drives we're always enjoyable and I do miss him, But I guess the stress got to be too much this morning. Did feel good to turn the phone off and make some chips.

    I ended up meeting with the FSAE people, they were nice enough so I helped them redesign their parts and have been making some of them.

    Finished the first one today, spent two Saturday's working on it, about 20 hours total or so. They bought me lunch both days, paid for the tooling I needed, and gave me a 100 bucks. Not bad, but not close to worth the time I spent on it.

    But, I figured that I am in the position I am in because other folks have taken the time to help me when they had better things to be doing. And I felt like I should try to pay it forward by helping these guys out.

    This is the pinion box for the steering rack of their little FSAE car.

    Fun little part of make, tight tolerance bore, excentric turning, radius milling, about a half a dozen diffrent set ups.

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    You will love cnc. I forgot what it is like to machine a part like that on a manual rotary table. Nice job.

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    Quote Originally Posted by converterking View Post
    You will love cnc. I forgot what it is like to machine a part like that on a manual rotary table. Nice job.

    Yeah - I couldn't agree more!

    I remember taking all day tossing a rotary up on the B'port, indicating the part in, and then taking half of tomorrow to run the part.....

    A wore out Haas will be 10x what you have there.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post
    Yeah - I couldn't agree more!

    I remember taking all day tossing a rotary up on the B'port, indicating the part in, and then taking half of tomorrow to run the part.....

    A wore out Haas will be 10x what you have there.


    --------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox
    That was not lost on me when making these parts.

    I'm saving up a little to buy the RPC control box, with start and balance caps. Once I have that, I'll go back to working on the CNC lathe.

    If I can get that CNC lathe to go, and figure out how to make parts on it, a VMC would be really cool.

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