Pole Barn Machine Shop - Page 16
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 16 of 22 FirstFirst ... 61415161718 ... LastLast
Results 301 to 320 of 425
  1. #301
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Houston TX
    Posts
    3,818
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    16
    Likes (Received)
    1867

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ewlsey View Post
    This is why you don't let anyone know you are good at anything. Don't let anyone at your school find out you can fix their POS car. You'll never have a moment of peace.
    I didn't realize these guys were in such need of help. But it has gotten to the point where I'm done dealing with their silliness. I got my own stuff to fix too.

    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post

    Might have died of exhaustion before I hit 21!

    I turned 21, 11 days ago. Exhausted, but that's because I'm working at an insane pace right now trying to get as much done before summer classes start. When I'm not working for pay, I'm waking up at 3 am, getting to the farm at 4:30 then working till past dark.

    Quote Originally Posted by moonlight machine View Post
    Doing the final machine work after fabrication is about as basic as it gets, how did that get past whoever is in charge there?
    That's what I though, but apparently not. These guys are willing to listen, aware they are inexperienced, and grateful for help.

    Nobody is born knowing everything, I've just been lucky and been given opportunities some of these folks never got. For several, building this car is the first time they've even turned a wrench.

    I'm glad to help them when I can, but there are times when I just have to think "wtf...".

  2. #302
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    26,836
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    8395

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alskdjfhg View Post
    I turned 21, 11 days ago. Exhausted, but that's because I'm working at an insane pace right now trying to get as much done before summer classes start. When I'm not working for pay, I'm waking up at 3 am, getting to the farm at 4:30 then working till past dark.
    Goood start. Sleep is like brakes on a farm pickup truck. A fool's accessory!
    Too bad you aren't ambidextrous!

    Probably a LOT of us here got that same sort of "multitasking" and short-sleep start.

    Wes mentioned College years and 30 hours as a mechanic.

    I did my few years in ENG with a 21-23 credit-hour daytime schedule, normal 8-hour second or third shift, USWA scale. Wasn't much, even Union Scale, that era. Still - it paid a bit over triple what pumping gas or waiting tables might have done.

    "Entertainment" was tending bar of a Saturday night. Same social relaxation, house side of the bar, sober, being paid as customer side side of the bar, drunk, and paying ME, the odd fight or attempted murder aside. Those were HIGHLY educational as well!

    Especially as WV was a "dry" state on anything over 3.2 beer...... legally. I was a master of a whole lot of the "Standard Bartender's Guide" back of that bar. Beer wasn't among them, so that "environment", too was... "educational".



    Never had a cent in College debt or loans. BTW.

    I just get as many as five robocalls a day NOW about packages to PAY OFF those loans I never had!

    Time Management. Dig into it.

    Hardest thing to learn? When, how, and why you MUST sometimes just say:"NO!"

    "Unable" works, too.

  3. #303
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    marysville ohio
    Posts
    9,304
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2659
    Likes (Received)
    6143

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post
    Somehow - I'm thinking that taking "poor investment" advise from a fella that has made racing his life long career, and especially if he doesn't include it in his short list of poor investement's, could be unwise...




    ---------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox
    True, if I was spending my own money to go racing. As we all know the way to make a small fortune in racing is to start with a large fortune. I however have been paid a lot of money to go racing and now racing pays me a lot of money to make odds and ends in my shop. However swimbo manages to spend an amazing amount of that money on her hobbies. Nothing wrong with a wife that does not figure "it's only money, you will make more"

  4. #304
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    West Unity, Ohio
    Posts
    25,235
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5506
    Likes (Received)
    7943

    Default

    My wife use'ta say exactly that!


    --------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

  5. #305
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Houston TX
    Posts
    3,818
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    16
    Likes (Received)
    1867

    Default

    Taking a page from the Oder book on lathe apron removal. No plans, just started cutting and welding stuff laying around the shop.

    And more FSAE stuff. Wheel spacers cause they ordered the wrong wheels.
    Last edited by alskdjfhg; 06-04-2018 at 03:29 PM.

  6. #306
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Houston, TX USA
    Posts
    29,648
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Looks good to me Matt.

  7. #307
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Houston TX
    Posts
    3,818
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    16
    Likes (Received)
    1867

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by johnoder View Post
    Looks good to me Matt.
    Well it works, but not the most elegant solution. The bolt clamps should have gone up farther on the apron, and I should have actually measured the pipe riser to minimize that length for greater stability.

    I've also been working on the 5CK, got everything broke loose and moving. Next step is to clean and fill will oil and test motor.

    Its wired up for for 440v right now, how much of the electrical starter set up will care about what voltage is running through it?

    I havent looked at it very closely to be honest, so I'm wondering if anyone here can recognize how much of it will need to be rewired for 220v.

    And yes I know the picture is less than ideal.

    Well looks like my old phone ate the picture. Piece of junk.

    But I'll try to describe what I'm working with. Looks like a normal motor starter, but with a set up so when you hit STOP, it reverses the motor until a little switch on the input pulley senses a change in rotations and then shuts the motor off.

    Does that sound like something that care if its running on 440v or 220v, or do all I have to do is change the motor inputs for long voltage?

    There also also a few other things, coolant pump, and separate 5hp motor for the rapids and feeds

  8. #308
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    West Unity, Ohio
    Posts
    25,235
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5506
    Likes (Received)
    7943

    Default

    Does the motor starter coil have 120v?
    If so - there would hafta be a small transformer in the cabinet somewhere that would need to be rewired for incoming V to the lower side. (Likely just two jumper brackets or equiv)

    The "heaters" (AKA "Overloads") would need to be sized up to handle 2wiced as many amps (doo to half the V). Then the 9 leads in the motor will need switched around. (I hope that you have 9)


    --------------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

  9. #309
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Houston TX
    Posts
    3,818
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    16
    Likes (Received)
    1867

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post
    Does the motor starter coil have 120v?
    If so - there would hafta be a small transformer in the cabinet somewhere that would need to be rewired for incoming V to the lower side. (Likely just two jumper brackets or equiv)

    The "heaters" (AKA "Overloads") would need to be sized up to handle 2wiced as many amps (doo to half the V). Then the 9 leads in the motor will need switched around. (I hope that you have 9)


    --------------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox
    The only part of that I think I can aswer is that the motor is a dual voltage motor. Says so on the tag.

    I'm woefully ignorant when it come to electrical. I understand all the parts conceptually, just haven't been around it, so don't know what they look like.

    I think I'll just have to come back with a better picture. But you've given me something to look for.

    It's a fairly complex electrical system for a manual machine, nothing like a Devlieg, but much more intensive than just a motor starter.

  10. #310
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    essex england
    Posts
    998
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1915
    Likes (Received)
    639

    Default

    Good Idea making the apron lift.A while back I lifted the apron off the chip tray of a big lang lathe.I couldn't get the 500lb saddle past my knees when lowering it. The saddle twisted caught my finger tip between two gears and as I was loosing control I couldn't do a thing..ouch that didnt save me anytime

  11. #311
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    26,836
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    8395

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alskdjfhg View Post
    Does that sound like something that care if its running on 440v or 220v, or do all I have to do is change the motor inputs for long voltage?
    It is probably worth the effort to get more and better photos, do a deeper dig.

    "Not uncommon" to have controls that expect there will be - or can be - a 1-P low/medium KVA control transformer to be strappable to provide, for example - 120 VAC for control from either of 220 VAC or 440 AC that is powering the rest of the machine. My Sheldon 12" Shaper has a 1-P control transformer on the back of it that does that. The 230 VAC side of it is actually 115-0-115 so there is also power for a common work light.

    This one is too small to also run a coolant pump, but rare is the shaper that use flood coolant, anyway!

    Adding a control transformer is cheap and easy. Generally easier than trying to swap-out all the niggling little parts to change the Voltage used.

    The heavier loads - final-drive motor the most obvious - one wants to re-connect, re-wind, or again sometimes at less cost and hassle, also power via a transformer. This one has to be heavier, of course.

    For example - there's a 15 KVA 230 VAC Delta <=> 440 VAC Delta here, no longer "in my plan", but not worth shipping. The old plan was to run a 10 HP 4XX VAC in VFD for ~ 5 to 7.5 HP 4XX VAC 3-P loads.

    My plan changed when I re-assessed what was hard to convert to 220/240 VAC . or NOT.. and decided to stay in the NEC "300 Volt class" and under, (220-240 VAC, specifically) and use NO "600 V class" (440-480 VAC specifically) goods at all. My "collection' of Old iron fit that model just fine. Works for me. Simplifies several things. HERE, anyway.

    Also zero VFD, but that's based on a different reasoning altogether.

    In your situation, you may want to survey your greater domain - the other machine-tools - and ask if it makes sense to HAVE 440-480 VAC "in general", so as to reduce the number of critters that need re-connected, re-wound, re-motored, and their controls and ancillary coolant pumps, etc. dealt with.

    If nothing else, it is a time consuming exercise to assess each one, then invest the care in not messing up the re-configuration. The parts - a change to thermal protective devices AKA "heaters" are not ordinarily expensive. Time, OTOH, is seldom in surplus and cannot be repurchased at any price once gone.

    2CW

  12. #312
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Milwaukee,WI
    Posts
    1,281
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    6887
    Likes (Received)
    996

    Default

    When I have to lower the apron on a lathe, I replace the bolts attaching the apron to the saddle with long pieces of threaded rod. And loosen the nuts until it is lowered onto a cart below. It also makes it easy to align everything during installation.

  13. #313
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Houston, TX USA
    Posts
    29,648
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    On the .'68 2D K&T, it was a prominent location in the electrical enclosure to just change jumpers on the control transformer for feeding the coil circuits on the five or six mag starter coils. That many motors still had to have their "pecker head" arrangement revised

    And of course the thermal overloads / heaters need to be dealt with as in a post above

  14. #314
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
    Posts
    11,714
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    51
    Likes (Received)
    8973

    Default

    I've used a forklift under the apron, or a basket sling around it and a crane above.

  15. #315
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Houston, USA
    Posts
    361
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1064
    Likes (Received)
    239

    Default

    The control transformer on my Devlieg had connectors to be able to run from 440 or 220, yours may as well. those transformers are relatively cheap anyway. It sure would be nice if you ran across a generator that could give you some 3-phase power out there. As little time as you spend out there it wouldn't cost that much to run, and would give you all the power you need and in most flavors.

  16. #316
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    2,599
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3052
    Likes (Received)
    479

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alskdjfhg View Post
    Taking a page from the Oder book on lathe apron removal. No plans, just started cutting and welding stuff laying around the shop.

    And more FSAE stuff. Wheel spacers cause they ordered the wrong wheels.

    Very nice work. Pictures are always worth a thousand words aren’t they?

  17. #317
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    26,836
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    8395

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by johnoder View Post
    On the .'68 2D K&T, it was a prominent location in the electrical enclosure to just change jumpers on the control transformer for feeding the coil circuits on the five or six mag starter coils. That many motors still had to have their "pecker head" arrangement revised

    And of course the thermal overloads / heaters need to be dealt with as in a post above
    There may have been a movement afoot to make dealing with all electricals saner on all machine tools - even manual ones - around the time NC / CNC began their takeover.

    The motors did not always have to be left for individual attention.

    "The French Gal" -HBX-360-BC main drive motor doesn't even own a junction box. A close-coupled elastomeric right angle boot, and all the wires that one would expect in a peckerhead right on the motor come out the other end of a conduit run inside the electrical cabinet mounted HS end, rear. Reconnection for high or low voltage is done right in the cabinet on DIN rail mounted terminal blocks. Relays, contactors, heaters etc all in the same place.

    Inside the door? Bless you, 20 December 1963 France - a complete electrical diagram done on tough mylar sheet, about 11" wide and 26" tall. Gone sort of ivory coloured with age, but still flexible - moreover still legible after all these years. It is even bilingually lettered in English as well as French.

  18. #318
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    4,143
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4445
    Likes (Received)
    2093

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rbdjr59 View Post
    The control transformer on my Devlieg had connectors to be able to run from 440 or 220, yours may as well. those transformers are relatively cheap anyway. It sure would be nice if you ran across a generator that could give you some 3-phase power out there. As little time as you spend out there it wouldn't cost that much to run, and would give you all the power you need and in most flavors.
    He would need a pretty healthy generator to start many of the motors on his machines. He could find, say, an ancient 6-71 powered generator for pretty cheap that would power everything, but the average 8 hour day in his shop would have that thing screaming 1800 all damn day so he could run a BP and an old lathe off and on. How much diesel do you figure that thing uses at 1800 no load all day? How much oil you figure it's going to suck past the rings at no load?

    RPC costs a buck or two a day to run and he's good to go. No way in hell you're running a generator for anywhere near that.

  19. Likes Ox, BobRenz liked this post
  20. #319
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    26,836
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    8395

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Garwood View Post
    He would need a pretty healthy generator to start many of the motors on his machines. He could find, say, an ancient 6-71 powered generator for pretty cheap that would power everything, but the average 8 hour day in his shop would have that thing screaming 1800 all damn day so he could run a BP and an old lathe off and on. How much diesel do you figure that thing uses at 1800 no load all day? How much oil you figure it's going to suck past the rings at no load?

    RPC costs a buck or two a day to run and he's good to go. No way in hell you're running a generator for anywhere near that.
    My MEP-803A "tactically quiet" nominal 10 KW (@ 8,000 feet above MSL) can haul 12 KW indefinitely, (I'm less than 400 feet above Mean Sea level), has no problem peaking for "a while" at 15 KW. Also 3-Phase capable.

    With nice tankage and fuel "polishing" filters and pumps, heavy wire and switchgear, I have about $6,000 in it. It has less than 1,000 hours on the Hobbs, so is good for many years.

    So yes, it can easily run a machine-tool of 10 HP. At, say only a 3 or 4 HP actual load? Meahh About 4 to 5 bucks an hour in # 2 Diesel fuel and a bit applied to oil and coolant costs?

    At shop billing rates of $75 to $150 / hour? That five bucks is not a show-stopper.

    Mind - that is not why it is HERE, and I do not use it that way.

    There IS a 10 HP RPC (and two 10 HP Phase-Perfect. And Dee Cee driven off 1-P).

    OTOH, Matt has a "time budget" challenge I do not have. A decent gen set might not be a bad idea in his situation at all. A good one has lots of uses in what seems to be changing into "hurricane alley. It can always be sold-on, later.

    Just please no screeming-meemies. They did their job. They deserve cremation and burial at sea with full military honours!

  21. #320
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    4,143
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4445
    Likes (Received)
    2093

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    My MEP-803A "tactically quiet" nominal 10 KW (@ 8,000 feet above MSL) can haul 12 KW indefinitely, (I'm less than 400 feet above Mean Sea level), has no problem peaking for "a while" at 15 KW. Also 3-Phase capable.

    With nice tankage and fuel "polishing" filters and pumps, heavy wire and switchgear, I have about $6,000 in it. It has less than 1,000 hours on the Hobbs, so is good for many years.

    So yes, it can easily run a machine-tool of 10 HP. At, say only a 3 or 4 HP actual load? Meahh About 4 to 5 bucks an hour in # 2 Diesel fuel and a bit applied to oil and coolant costs?

    At shop billing rates of $75 to $150 / hour? That five bucks is not a show-stopper.

    Mind - that is not why it is HERE, and I do not use it that way.

    There IS a 10 HP RPC (and two 10 HP Phase-Perfect. And Dee Cee driven off 1-P).

    OTOH, Matt has a "time budget" challenge I do not have. A decent gen set might not be a bad idea in his situation at all. A good one has lots of uses in what seems to be changing into "hurricane alley. It can always be sold-on, later.

    Just please no screeming-meemies. They did their job. They deserve cremation and burial at sea with full military honours!
    You start many 20+ HP motors on genset power?

    I spent a lot of time around, on and in 1MW diesel generators and if you were next to the engine you could hear it take the load when a bigger motor was started in the plant.

    As part of my job, I helped replace 4 16V149TI Detroits with modern V12 Cats rated for the same power. The Cat's did not handle the loads as gracefully as the old Jimmies because they didn't have the ass to back up those numbers.

    My gist is the nameplate may say one thing, but look at the size of what you're spinning up. You want to run a 1940's 20HP motor I suggest you have some spare capacity to get things rolling.

  22. Likes TDegenhart liked this post

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •