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  1. #161
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    Quote Originally Posted by alskdjfhg View Post
    Thanks, it's just a pole barn, but the more machines that come back to life and the more organized I get stuff the better it looks to me.
    I can only echo the sentiments of how nice it has turned out up through now. Nicely done.

    With that said...

    Quote Originally Posted by alskdjfhg View Post
    I really need about 4 times the area, 2 twice the ceiling height and atleast two overhead cranes....
    LMAO!
    This is EXACTLY my fear as we plan, right now. I worry much about making that final decision of size and material handling/rigging concerns at this stage, and for exactly the reasons that you are now going through.

    P.S., I want to thank you again ( publicly ) for being so forthcoming and open handed with the information you shared with me in our emails. It was ( is ) helpful to us while we struggle our way through our own plans right now.

    Keep going! You're doing GREAT!

  2. #162
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    I've rarely been to a shop that had too much space or too much ceiling height or too much tooling or too much power. You have to put a stake in the ground and say this is it for now. The economics will decide when it's time to move the stakes.

    One of the mistakes I see businesses make (I made it) is that they don't find a way to make a profit with what they have before rushing to upgrade. If what you have works and makes money, you can justify an upgrade. If what you have doesn't work and doesn't make a profit, you probably can't buy your way out of it with better equipment or facilities.

    Maybe I'm wrong on that, but I believe it. I wish I had thought more about that when I was getting started. It worked out for me, but I think I made it harder than it needed to be by biting of more than I could chew.

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  4. #163
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    Just make arrangements for an expansion. Put in support columns and recess lighting fixtures so that when you add the bridge crane, the support structure is already there. This type of thing.

    Tom

  5. #164
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    Quote Originally Posted by ewlsey View Post
    I've rarely been to a shop that had too much space or too much ceiling height or too much tooling or too much power.
    When you hafta pay taxes or heat bill, both of those features are direct liabilities!

    Not that he will need to fret the heat bill much there. I would think that a fella could just pony up a salamander heater to his workspace on cold days and call it good?


    -------------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

  6. #165
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post
    Not that he will need to fret the heat bill much there. I would think that a fella could just pony up a salamander heater to his workspace on cold days and call it good?
    Crazy to me. And no insulation in the building.

    Meanwhile it's 6 degrees here and I'm trying to change a power steering pump in the parking lot. I can go about 10 minutes before my fingers are numb and I have to come in to warm up.

  7. #166
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    I think the next size building will have 30-40' walls, 10,000-15,000 sqft, 7.5ton overhead crane with two hoists on the same crane. At work we flip parts around with an overhead crane with one hoist, I don't like doing it at all. Two hoists on one bridge make alot more sense to me.

    And then maybe a 20ton crane for heavy lifting. I'd eventually like to get some larger machine tools.

    Right now that's all in the idea stage, I've got my hands full right now.

    Quote Originally Posted by Zahnrad Kopf View Post
    I can only echo the sentiments of how nice it has turned out up through now. Nicely done.
    Thanks, I don't mind talking numbers about this building, but the issue is that those numbers can vary so wildly, what I got may be different for someone else in a different part of the country or doing the building a little differently.

    If I were in Houston, I would have expected to have atleast doubled the number I told you. Would have been a totally different ball game.

    Quote Originally Posted by ewlsey View Post
    The economics will decide when it's time to move the stakes.
    I agree 100%.

    I had a budget I was working with, and this building isn't perfect, but it was paid for with cash, the land it's on is also paid for. That lends a certain level of flexibility.

    But that also means progress is very slow. Last two weeks or so I've spent about $1000 on wire, boxes and electrical stuff. May not sound like much, but that's alot for me right now.

    The lawyer says we should a court date to finish probate around March, and once probate is done and some other pending legal stuff. I'll know more about what direction I'm headed. Right now I'm playing everything safe and just want to get though school.

    Develop this machine shop experiment slowly and with as little risk and capital expenditure as possible. I have time.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post
    Not that he will need to fret the heat bill much there. I would think that a fella could just pony up a salamander heater to his workspace on cold days and call it good?
    I got pretty cold for about a week in December, lows in the teens and highs in the upper 20's. When it gets like that, the city just shuts down for a day or two and waits for the weather to change.

    A few days we've needed a salamander heater at work, couple of days it was in the mid 30's inside the shop.

    But on the whole, heat isn't too big of an issue down here.

    Insulation is money will spent though, not for the winter time, but for the summer. An uninsulated metal building can really turn into an oven on a Texas August day....

    I have a radiant heat barrier, it makes a big different on hot days.

    Quote Originally Posted by ewlsey View Post
    it's 6 degrees here
    It's a frigid 58 here...

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    It's been surprising to me just how much time and money building envelopes.

  9. #168
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    You sure have big plans.
    Better git work for this first. Not just stuff to put in it.

    ------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

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    What type of work do you want to do? How many employees are you planning on hiring? You have a nice start.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post
    You sure have big plans.
    Better git work for this first. Not just stuff to put in it.

    ------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox
    "Work first" is not always the best either. I am overwhelmed, facing borderline depression/burn-out, because of "work first".

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    Quote Originally Posted by wheelieking71 View Post
    "Work first" is not always the best either. I am overwhelmed, facing borderline depression/burn-out, because of "work first".
    That's because you're doing it all wrong. Here the steps required for a small business owner:

    1 Start business
    2 Get work
    3 Hire employees
    4 Borrow money for more equipment and more employees
    5 Hire a manager
    6 Buy a boat
    7 Spend most days at the local bar
    8 Meet a 25 year old
    9 Buy her fake boobs
    10 Stop making loan payments
    11 Get her pregnant
    12 Get divorced
    13 Lay off employees
    14 Declare bankruptcy
    15 Skip town

    That's the American way. 15 easy steps. Repeat as needed.

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  15. #172
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    Quote Originally Posted by wheelieking71 View Post
    "Work first" is not always the best either. I am overwhelmed, facing borderline depression/burn-out, because of "work first".

    What does that have to doo with this?


    -----------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

  16. #173
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    Quote Originally Posted by ewlsey View Post
    That's because you're doing it all wrong. Here the steps required for a small business owner:

    1 Start business
    2 Get work
    3 Hire employees
    4 Borrow money for more equipment and more employees
    5 Hire a manager
    6 Buy a boat
    7 Spend most days at the local bar
    8 Meet a 25 year old
    9 Buy her fake boobs
    10 Stop making loan payments
    11 Get her pregnant
    12 Get divorced
    13 Lay off employees
    14 Declare bankruptcy
    15 Skip town

    That's the American way. 15 easy steps. Repeat as needed.
    Seems to me you married and had a kid already, next thing you know you won't be positioned to declare bankruptcy, due to not liking boats or bars, actually turning a profit.

    Just where'd you go wrong on the BIG stuff? Make the same mistake I did?

    Actually prefer small boobs, genuine, so long as there is a quality woman back of 'em even MORE "genuine"?


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  18. #174
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    It would be funnier if I had not seen that exact scenario happen more than once. Seems to afflict the body shop or carpenter types more than others.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ewlsey View Post
    It would be funnier if I had not seen that exact scenario happen more than once. Seems to afflict the body shop or carpenter types more than others.
    Peter Drucker - according to some - went out of style a while back, Don't believe it. The Practice of Management and The Effective Executive are bedrock.

    "NOTHING happens until somebody sells something." Emphasis my own.

    Don't build the shop first. Find a customer first, IOW.

    At least your list had that as numbah TWO. Some it comes in later, yet. Sort of an afterthought, even.

  20. #176
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    Quote Originally Posted by ewlsey View Post
    That's because you're doing it all wrong. Here the steps required for a small business owner:

    1 Start business
    2 Get work
    3 Hire employees
    4 Borrow money for more equipment and more employees
    5 Hire a manager
    6 Buy a boat
    7 Spend most days at the local bar
    8 Meet a 25 year old
    9 Buy her fake boobs
    10 Stop making loan payments
    11 Get her pregnant
    12 Get divorced
    13 Lay off employees
    14 Declare bankruptcy
    15 Skip town

    That's the American way. 15 easy steps. Repeat as needed.



    ---------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

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  22. #177
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post



    ---------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox
    Hard man Ox. Really hard man...

    Breast Augmentation Richmond, VA | Midlothian Breast AugmentationRichmond Plastic Surgeons

    Still not sold on it. Wife sez mine are bigger than hers already.

  23. #178
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    I meant the boats.

    What on Earth is goin' through your head?


    ---------------------

    Off the wind on this heading lie the Marquesas
    Ox

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  25. #179
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post
    I meant the boats.

    What on Earth is goin' through your head?
    Cold air, mostly, this time of year. Can't find me damned earplugs!

    And fess up. It weren't boats, either. You be a "hard" man as to your choice of water as well. Not into that souply-pooply LIQUID version.

    Boats for case-hardened water if you please:

    Extreme Snowmobile | random | Pinterest

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    Quote Originally Posted by ewlsey View Post
    It would be funnier if I had not seen that exact scenario happen more than once. Seems to afflict the body shop or carpenter types more than others.
    They tend to be in "passive" lines of business. They don't act. They react.

    Body shop depends on other folk wrecking stuff badly enough to require fixing, and profitably, not so badly as to go straight to the crushers. Can't get away with pouring liquid soap at an intersection to improve his business volume.

    Carpenter doesn't sell an unbuilt house. Awaits a builder or remodeler to need him over a decision someone else made. Or not.

    A Machine or welding shop with no product line nor stable contracts has much the same "reactive" existence.

    Even once capabilities are well known, relationships and reputation solidly established, it is forever at the mercy of other people's budgeting, decision-making....

    Or neither.

    C**t hoors are better-off than metalmangler hoors. Clientele have more reliably predictable needs, tight economy, cash gets short, can at least always get something to eat.


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