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  1. #161
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    Quote Originally Posted by david n View Post
    You got a big shiny box showin' up soon?
    Not yet, looking into a different dealer/machine now, maybe something higher end and with service or wants to sell something(long story)... But when I saw this thread the other week I thought man that telehandler would be perfect for my terrain here when I do get another machine. But right now, I mostly just found myself stuck while trying to move my current machines into the new building, Plan B idea of rolling them all the way ain't working so great, should have stuck to plan A(now onto plan C). Locally biggest telehandler I can find so far is 12k/lb cap, machine is about 5k/lb, just not sure how much to oversize the handler. Some idea of the capacity of that one in these pictures might have solved that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SND View Post
    Some idea of the capacity of that one in these pictures might have solved that.
    Crated shipping weight was supposed to be 8500lbs. That was almost enough to overcome the fork's capacity to curl back...maybe a leakage issue or maybe it was just at its limit.

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  4. #163
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    Default Sexual harassment by employees

    Had my 70th b'day party at our house Saturday nite (Feb 17th) and was presented with this T-shirt by a cabal of women employees:

    machinist-meme-tshirt.jpg

    There were a lot of guests (accountants' wives, etc.) who had no idea what G-code was, so one of the girls translated for one and all, "Im'a tap it 'til she squirts!" I had hired a bartender for the party and by that time everybody was pretty drunk, so they laughed hysterically. I have to say, they have a pretty decent sense of humor (or perhaps that's not the word) in spite of being machinists.

    Obviously we don't have sexual harrassment issues here; Gloria refers to it as sexual hisassment.

  5. #164
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    Happy Birthday. I'll take a XXL please lol

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    Thursday we will celebrate 40 years in business as well as the 25th anniversary of moving the company to Casper, WY. The plant floor will be shut down except for some machines cutting air above the part with the coolant off so people can watch...and be startled by a tool change, heh, heh. We have a foreign guest or two. Speeches will be made. There is some discussion about whether that should occur before or after the serving of alcohol...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails were-ready.jpg  

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    Congratulations!

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    I think your gonna need a bigger fridge!

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    Been gone from PM for a while, the politics had begun to waste too many brain cells otherwise needed to keep the employees fed. Didn't buy any new machines in 2018 because we figured we wouldn't need the Section 179 deduction...wrong! Things keep up the way they are, we'll put another 5-axis mill on the floor this year.

    I see I never posted anything in this thread about rotary swaging, a service we resurrected after having set it aside about ten years ago. This is a hammer die; a pair of them come together ten times per revolution at 300 RPM. You feed a piece of tubing into it and it reduces the diameter while thickening the wall—a nice way to be able to put threads in a large stiff tube without having to weld in machined slugs (pics of the finished tubes when I can find them).

    Cheerz, my friends.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails die-half.jpg  

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    Found 'em.

    The photo shows a conventional reduction of 1-1/4 OD x .065 wall tubing for a 3/4-16 rod end, compared to a long-die reduction all the way to 1/2-20. For those who aren't race-car geeks, the further-reduced tube has a greater stiffness/weight ratio because the rod end represents unsprung weight—that is, it's on the wrong end of the car's springs and its negative effect on handling and grip is about ten times that of sprung, or "chassis" weight.

    The other photo is the entire array of diameters and threads, both inch and mm, that our long-die machine can produce with the current crop of dies. The dies were all made in a 3-axis Haas from S-7 material, about 600 lbs of it. Elapsed time averaged 30 minutes per die half with about ten minutes' stoning afterward. The threading is of course done offline in 2nd-op lathes, including a Hardinge with its spindle bored out to pass 1-1/2 tubing.

    Last, for older race fans, is the Frankland factory in Ruskin, FL this spring, a few weeks before demolition. By 1975 that little place was the largest producer of quick-change rears in the USA. I was given a tour around that time and observed a number of really clever money-making production tricks, which they probably would've been better off keeping secret. Considering the competition that sprang up I think they showed them off to the wrong people.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails long-vs-short-swage-rod-ends.jpg   swaged-tube-array.jpg   former-frankland-plant.jpg  

  11. #170
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    Good to see you back Oldwrench.

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  13. #171
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    Considering the competition that sprang up I think they showed them off to the wrong people.






    -----------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

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    Could you show a photo of the rotary swaging machine? Or a link to one similar? I've never seen that done cold.

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    Interesting story about Frankland.
    It was my experience many years ago that the racing parts industry is rabidly competitive.
    Any new idea, part, or tool sold this season, WILL be copied and sold cheaper next season.

    Hardinge swages the back end of the R8 collets to reduce it for the drawbar threads.
    Early models had an insert or 'bushing' pinned in.

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    We have two machines inside this soundproof enclosure. Swaging is extremely loud; imagine the impact wrench of the gods. The smaller one pictured has 1-3/4 dia. capacity in tubing—less than that in solid bar but we don't work solid. The larger one, not pictured, will do 2-1/4 dia. in tubing and 15/16 solid. In order to do straight and concentric work the tube must be guided in a fixture parallel to the Z axis. This one has large ball bushings and quick-change Delrin bushings to support the tube. The operator holds the tube with a rag and pushes it into the machine. The feeding resistance is proportional to the angle of the taper; in general you can hand-feed work up to around 10° depending on the material. With each blow the dies momentarily grip the work and rotate it. The operator has to resist that, but it's not as hard as it sounds. The trick is for the dies to have a cavity oval enough to allow springing of the material under the blows, but with enough circular contact area to support the surface and keep it round and wrinkle-free. Almost no textbooks exist on the process. To swage a given target ID from a starting OD and wall you have to calculate the swaged OD and the expected wall thickness increase.

    The process was a lot more common in the USA during the decades of iron bending. You can Google the process and find videos of swaging in Chinese plants but I have yet to see anything being done straight, so it's only instructional in a very general way, like shoveling.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails swager-enclosure.jpg   swager.jpg   tube-feeder.jpg  

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  21. #175
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    Quote Originally Posted by dkmc View Post
    Any new idea, part, or tool sold this season, WILL be copied and sold cheaper next season.
    Absolutely, and true of most products; probably accounts for the evolution of US industry away from rubber duckies and toward harder-to-copy products.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldwrench View Post
    Absolutely, and true of most products; probably accounts for the evolution of US industry away from rubber duckies and toward harder-to-copy products.
    As a teenager in the '70's I hung around a couple Speed Shops. There was this paper called National Parts Peddler, and it was filled
    with ads from racing parts and racing tool suppliers. Also had classifieds in the back. My impression was that a lot of these suppliers were job shops with racer owners. You'd see one supplier with a 1/2 page ad announcing their latest invention or better go-fast part. Within a few months, or maybe over the next winter, the next supplier would be out with their ad, and their copied and "improved" version (always priced cheaper). And maybe even wording in the ad hinting at slamming the other supplier. I always found it interesting and a bit off the wall.

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  24. #177
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    Glad to have you back. I really like the rotary swedgeing post. I had a Franklin in a dirt late model about 35 years ago. Speaking of copies Halibrand was around before Franklin......

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  26. #178
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    Didn't know unsprung weight was important on swaging machine parts too .

    I knew that name sounded familiar. The Fenn factory is located in East Berlin, Ct. About 10 miles away from me.

    Didn't know that they were still making machines.

    Found a video link on their website, showing the process, pretty neat.

    YouTube

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  28. #179
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldwrench View Post
    We have two machines inside this soundproof enclosure. Swaging is extremely loud; imagine the impact wrench of the gods. The smaller one pictured has 1-3/4 dia. capacity in tubing—less than that in solid bar but we don't work solid. The larger one, not pictured, will do 2-1/4 dia. in tubing and 15/16 solid. In order to do straight and concentric work the tube must be guided in a fixture parallel to the Z axis. This one has large ball bushings and quick-change Delrin bushings to support the tube. The operator holds the tube with a rag and pushes it into the machine. The feeding resistance is proportional to the angle of the taper; in general you can hand-feed work up to around 10° depending on the material. With each blow the dies momentarily grip the work and rotate it. The operator has to resist that, but it's not as hard as it sounds. The trick is for the dies to have a cavity oval enough to allow springing of the material under the blows, but with enough circular contact area to support the surface and keep it round and wrinkle-free. Almost no textbooks exist on the process. To swage a given target ID from a starting OD and wall you have to calculate the swaged OD and the expected wall thickness increase.
    \
    Just really cool stuff

    I love it when I learn about something I hadn't even wondered about before

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  30. #180
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    Neat capability on the swaging. How are multi-step swages done? Is it done in a single die set, or multiple dies, with annealing between passes? I've got some control rods that someday will be need to be recreated, and any of them have 2 or 3 steps on each end, rather than a single step.


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