Books on metrology
Close
Login to Your Account
Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    New York, USA
    Posts
    13
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    9
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default Books on metrology

    Hey guys as the title suggests I'm looking for some suggestions on good books on metrology, nothing too specific more of a general over view and best practices type of deal! Thanks!

    Sent from my Z978 using Tapatalk

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Country
    CANADA
    State/Province
    British Columbia
    Posts
    1,191
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    263
    Likes (Received)
    620

    Default

    A more specific topic of metrology, but an excellent book:

    Optical Tooling by Philip Kissam

  3. Likes LP08SS liked this post
  4. #3
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Country
    DENMARK
    Posts
    3,501
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4041
    Likes (Received)
    12640

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LP08SS View Post
    Hey guys as the title suggests I'm looking for some suggestions on good books on metrology, nothing too specific more of a general over view and best practices type of deal! Thanks!

    Sent from my Z978 using Tapatalk
    It'd help if you were more specific plus info on what you'd be wanting to learn more about and why.

    The biggest problem with "best practice" is that especially within electronics things develop fast.

    IMO the internet would be your best bet when you know what you are looking for. You can probably print what you find handy and/or useful.

    Metrology - Wikipedia

  5. Likes converterking liked this post
  6. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    New York, USA
    Posts
    13
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    9
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by billzweig View Post
    A more specific topic of metrology, but an excellent book:

    Optical Tooling by Philip Kissam
    Thank you I'll look into it!

    Sent from my Z978 using Tapatalk

  7. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    New York, USA
    Posts
    13
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    9
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon B. Clarke View Post
    It'd help if you were more specific plus info on what you'd be wanting to learn more about and why.

    The biggest problem with "best practice" is that especially within electronics things develop fast.

    IMO the internet would be your best bet when you know what you are looking for. You can probably print what you find handy and/or useful.

    Metrology - Wikipedia
    Hmm ok well, the only reason Im being general is because I honestly don't know what I should be looking into. I will explain my situation and my Logic and maybe you can shed light from there. So far I've got ten years of experience in cnc machining primarily lathe, the technical school I went to was machining basics and basic measuring skills, proper handling and use of mics and calipers etc. other than that we barely even learned about run out other than trueing something up in a 4 jaw chuck. So now I have access to a optical comparator which I've learned some things about along the way but not much. I tried learning from our inspection guys but quite frankly the one has just no interest in teaching and I would usually but heads with the other because he likes to talk down to people and I don't tolerate that kind of stuff. So there always seems to be a rift between how I measure things and how inspection measures things and even the way my foreman would measure something. So my logic is if I can somehow teach myself the standards and practices of a quality control inspector and maybe I'd have an easier time dealing with them and have more of a civilized conversation with them and not just being a deer in headlights. Not to mention as a machinist I feel I should have a deeper understanding of it than I do! Hope this helps a bit

    Sent from my Z978 using Tapatalk

  8. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    48
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4
    Likes (Received)
    5

    Default

    Handbook of Dimensional Measurement by Mark Curtis is pretty good.

    Bob

  9. Likes LP08SS, Eric M liked this post
  10. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Rochester, NY, USA
    Posts
    117
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4
    Likes (Received)
    44

    Default

    Moore Special Tool had a series of books which show some extremes of metrology.

    This is a PDF of the actual book!
    https://pearl-hifi.com/06_Lit_Archiv...l_Accuracy.pdf


    Publications at Moore Tool: Precision Machining Technology, Precision Tools

    Other books here:
    Index of /06_Lit_Archive/15_Mfrs_Publications/Moore_Tools

  11. Likes LP08SS, Dumpster_diving, Kai Kendall liked this post
  12. #8
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Country
    DENMARK
    Posts
    3,501
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4041
    Likes (Received)
    12640

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LP08SS View Post
    Hmm ok well, the only reason Im being general is because I honestly don't know what I should be looking into. I will explain my situation and my Logic and maybe you can shed light from there. So far I've got ten years of experience in cnc machining primarily lathe, the technical school I went to was machining basics and basic measuring skills, proper handling and use of mics and calipers etc. other than that we barely even learned about run out other than trueing something up in a 4 jaw chuck. So now I have access to a optical comparator which I've learned some things about along the way but not much. I tried learning from our inspection guys but quite frankly the one has just no interest in teaching and I would usually but heads with the other because he likes to talk down to people and I don't tolerate that kind of stuff. So there always seems to be a rift between how I measure things and how inspection measures things and even the way my foreman would measure something. So my logic is if I can somehow teach myself the standards and practices of a quality control inspector and maybe I'd have an easier time dealing with them and have more of a civilized conversation with them and not just being a deer in headlights. Not to mention as a machinist I feel I should have a deeper understanding of it than I do! Hope this helps a bit

    Sent from my Z978 using Tapatalk
    Not sure if what you are looking for can be read. Let's assume your foreman and inspector know what they are doing why not just watch and learn instead of "butting heads". From that I get the impression you want to discuss and try things your way. Nothing wrong with that except "fools rush in where angels fear to tread.

    I've worked with optical comparators for years and they are all (to me at least) pretty straight forward. How a discussion could evolve on how to use one is beyond me.

  13. Likes converterking liked this post
  14. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    New York, USA
    Posts
    13
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    9
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon B. Clarke View Post
    Not sure if what you are looking for can be read. Let's assume your foreman and inspector know what they are doing why not just watch and learn instead of "butting heads". From that I get the impression you want to discuss and try things your way. Nothing wrong with that except "fools rush in where angels fear to tread.

    I've worked with optical comparators for years and they are all (to me at least) pretty straight forward. How a discussion could evolve on how to use one is beyond me.
    No, it's actually quite the opposite, im rather cautious and in being so I end up asking questions (maybe even too many) because I like to have a thorough understanding of something before going on my Own way. As for just watching and not "butting heads" I wish we could because he is a wealth of knowledge that I would love to learn from but we just do not get along it's as easy as that. I guess I wasn't blessed to have a charming personality such as yours that everyone loves! But thanks for your input I appreciate it!

    Sent from my Z978 using Tapatalk

  15. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    West-Central Illinois, USA
    Posts
    1,281
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2048
    Likes (Received)
    583

    Default

    Well there’s measuring and methods of measuring… It’s mostly a learned thing, how-to in the head and this-way with the hands.

    For the figuring out how, the WAJ Chapman, Senior Workshop Calculations book has a chapter on measurement and gaging that has a blizzard of ways to go at given measuring challenges. (attaching an odd but cool one)

    Then there’s a very good book from DoAll named “The Science of Precision Measurement”. It’s about non-existent in the wild but a NEW, Reprinted from edition copy is available here for 18 bucks. (cover attached, I couldn’t find an image with google-foo)→ Science Precision Measurement - AbeBooks
    That little jewel explains how to use gage block & optical flats to measure dimension values in light bands (since 1 light band = 11.6 millionths of an inch and a human can resolve to 1/10 band, it’s a little out of the range of an average CMM).

    Then there is likely some free stuff for care & handling of tools like from Starrett (& surely others). (Covers attached)

    Good luck,
    Matt
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails measure_bore_pointgage_p28.jpg   measure_bore_pointgage_p29.jpg   measure_bore_pointgage_p30.jpg   doall_measure_cover.jpg   starrett_measure_covers.jpg  


  16. Likes LP08SS liked this post
  17. #11
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Country
    DENMARK
    Posts
    3,501
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4041
    Likes (Received)
    12640

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LP08SS View Post
    No, it's actually quite the opposite, im rather cautious and in being so I end up asking questions (maybe even too many) because I like to have a thorough understanding of something before going on my Own way. As for just watching and not "butting heads" I wish we could because he is a wealth of knowledge that I would love to learn from but we just do not get along it's as easy as that. I guess I wasn't blessed to have a charming personality such as yours that everyone loves! But thanks for your input I appreciate it!

    Sent from my Z978 using Tapatalk
    With your "I guess I wasn't blessed to have a charming personality such as yours that everyone loves!" I'd be hesitant about helping you if that's your idea as to learning.

    If you learned from someone that you believe knows what he's doing why would you be "going on my Own way"?

    Maybe thanks to my "charming personality" I've never had a problem with people giving me advice or me them.

    Book learning is good but it doesn't beat "hands on" as far as practicality goes.

  18. Likes converterking liked this post
  19. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    21
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    43
    Likes (Received)
    15

    Default

    MIL-STD-120 is somewhat dated but a good reference (and learning) source. I would prefer that you get a hard copy if possible. Sometime within the last two or three years I downloaded a PDF but the illustrations are not as crisp as they should be.

  20. Likes Flightmap liked this post
  21. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    35
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    23
    Likes (Received)
    8

    Default

    foundations of mechanical accuracy by Wayne Moore

  22. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Flushing/Flint, Michigan
    Posts
    8,114
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    415
    Likes (Received)
    6695

    Default

    No books are going to get you out and most people using stuff in the optical compartor world will give you bad advice.
    Gauging MSA.
    The other and easier side of life in a bigger company is "we have done it this way forever" and go with the flow even if it seems wrong.
    Bob

  23. #15
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    2,599
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3052
    Likes (Received)
    479

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LP08SS View Post
    Hmm ok well, the only reason Im being general is because I honestly don't know what I should be looking into. I will explain my situation and my Logic and maybe you can shed light from there. So far I've got ten years of experience in cnc machining primarily lathe, the technical school I went to was machining basics and basic measuring skills, proper handling and use of mics and calipers etc. other than that we barely even learned about run out other than trueing something up in a 4 jaw chuck. So now I have access to a optical comparator which I've learned some things about along the way but not much. I tried learning from our inspection guys but quite frankly the one has just no interest in teaching and I would usually but heads with the other because he likes to talk down to people and I don't tolerate that kind of stuff. So there always seems to be a rift between how I measure things and how inspection measures things and even the way my foreman would measure something. So my logic is if I can somehow teach myself the standards and practices of a quality control inspector and maybe I'd have an easier time dealing with them and have more of a civilized conversation with them and not just being a deer in headlights. Not to mention as a machinist I feel I should have a deeper understanding of it than I do! Hope this helps a bit

    Sent from my Z978 using Tapatalk
    There is a fair amount in Machinery’s Handbook.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •