Chamfer Gauge
Close
Login to Your Account
Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 17 of 17

Thread: Chamfer Gauge

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Brandon, MS
    Posts
    806
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    113
    Likes (Received)
    157

    Default Chamfer Gauge

    Can anyone recommend a chamfer gauge or have any recommendations on making one? I have a blind bore that's a little about 1.75" dia for instance. The hole has a very large chamfer around the top of the bore. The chamfer angle can vary from 20, 30, 38, or 45 degrees.

    What do you recommend as far as a gauge to measure the depth of these chamfers? The actual print callout is from the bottom of the blind bore to the bottom of the chamfer. I suppose I could measure both of these off of the top of the plate.

    Do you think I should just order one of the standard Starrett chamfer depth gauges from MSC and try it out? I'm a little concerned about the lack of a master they brag about. Do you think I should buy the stock gauge and make my own master? Do you think I should try to make my own tip and use a dial indicator/depth gauge?

    Please share your thoughts.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Richland, WA
    Posts
    1,048
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    38
    Likes (Received)
    10

    Default

    Pour a mold and then check it on an optical comparitor.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Centerville,OH
    Posts
    2,143
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    79

    Default

    It's pretty strange that the angle doesn't matter but the depth from a C'bore does. If you only have 1 a mold would work but expense mounts with each one. You didn't say what the tolerance was though. you could just check the depth of the c'bore and the chamfer seperately and do the math. I'm spoiled. I'd just take it over to the contracer! -Mike

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Clearfield, PA
    Posts
    1,141
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Holescreek View Post
    I'm spoiled. I'd just take it over to the contracer! -Mike
    Thats funny I was thinking the same thing!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    South Central PA
    Posts
    13,386
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2139
    Likes (Received)
    3326

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CatMan View Post

    Do you think I should just order one of the standard Starrett chamfer depth gauges from MSC and try it out? I'm a little concerned about the lack of a master they brag about. Do you think I should buy the stock gauge and make my own master? Do you think I should try to make my own tip and use a dial indicator/depth gauge?

    Please share your thoughts.

    Do you mean one of these?



    They give you the diameter of the chamfer at the top. You don't need a standard to calibrate it because there is a small flat on tip that allows you to zero the gage against a flat surface and turn the dial to the diameter of that flat. Not a true calibration I guess, but a way to zero the gage in the field.

    I have a used one or two to sell if you want used.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    836
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    13
    Likes (Received)
    71

    Default

    I've never seen a chamfer gage big enough for a 1.75" hole chamfer. It might have to be a special. Call Fowler or Starrett and see if they could make one. Also might consider gage balls and a height gage. Again, size might be a problem. Cheapest way out will be mold. How will the customer check them?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    344
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    65

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CatMan View Post
    Can anyone recommend a chamfer gauge or have any recommendations on making one? I have a blind bore that's a little about 1.75" dia for instance. The hole has a very large chamfer around the top of the bore. The chamfer angle can vary from 20, 30, 38, or 45 degrees.

    Please share your thoughts.
    CatMan
    More info would help. Quantities? Tolerances?
    Gene

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Brandon, MS
    Posts
    806
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    113
    Likes (Received)
    157

    Default

    The quantities on these chamfers is going to be high. I'm just going to check them on an audit basis, but it's going to be a running deal, so it justifies something to measure them.

    The tolerance on this feature is +/- 0.010".

    I'm interested in the ball idea. Pretty standard really and I suppose I should have thought about it before. I could give them a 2" ball and rig up some indicator base. Then figure up the ball heights and give them a little cross reference sheet of what the ball height should be.

    I like the ideas so far. Keep'em comin.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Livonia, MI
    Posts
    40
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    How about a ball & ring somewhat taller than the ball height when inserted? Ball height can be checked down from the top of the ring to top of the ball with either depth mics or an indicator with a depth base and flat tip. That's how I used to check tapered holes on ID grinder.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Southeastern US
    Posts
    6,386
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    842
    Likes (Received)
    2797

    Default

    Dunno what your budget is, but a Mahr Contourgraph is what we use. It has multiple uses.

    One example: http://www.mahrfederal.com/index.php?NodeID=2736
    Full Line: http://www.mahrfederal.com/index.php?NodeID=2564

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Northern Illinois
    Posts
    2,912
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1615
    Likes (Received)
    1736

    Default

    The ball idea will work, so long as you can confirm the angle. The tolerance on the angle may be wide, but if you don’t know what it actually is, checking with one ball won’t tell you the exact point where it intersects the bore. The standard way to confirm the angle would be to use two different size balls, but the chamfer sounds too short to do this easily.

    Since this is going to an ongoing job, I think I would grind a cylinder, to be used like a go-no go gage. The smaller diameter would just fit an on spec bore. The larger would be sized just ever so slightly larger, so that it is guaranteed that its step is just above the transition from chamfer to bore; a known dimension from the step to the top of the gage would make it easy to measure and do the math to find the location if the bottom of the chamfer relative to the bottom of the part.

    Dennis

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Richland, WA
    Posts
    1,048
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    38
    Likes (Received)
    10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CatMan View Post
    The quantities on these chamfers is going to be high. I'm just going to check them on an audit basis, but it's going to be a running deal, so it justifies something to measure them.

    The tolerance on this feature is +/- 0.010".
    I still think that if all you're doing is "auditing" that feature, a mold is the way to go. For Pete's sake, ±.01 might as well be a mile on any CNC.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    286
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    3

    Default Cmm

    CMM.

    Pin and Cylinder.

    Use two pins one that will go into the hole and one that is .001 over size. Grind the ends of the OS pin flat and parallel, keep the edges sharp. Put it in a bushing that spans the hole, to hold the pin perpendicular, then calculate the distance.

    How deep is the hole and what is its tollerance?

    You could periodically run a test part (if you are using a CNC) and cut it in half.
    Last edited by huntinguy; 06-29-2008 at 04:55 AM. Reason: I ..... think ..... slow...

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    344
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    65

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CatMan View Post
    What do you recommend as far as a gauge to measure the depth of these chamfers? The actual print callout is from the bottom of the blind bore to the bottom of the chamfer. I suppose I could measure both of these off of the top of the plate.
    Hole depth tolerance?
    Hole diameter tolerance?
    Chamfer angle tolerance?
    Gene

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Sacramento,ca
    Posts
    158
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Tool makers scope!!

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    lebanon, ohio
    Posts
    6
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Turn a slug that will slide in the hole with a chamfer large enough not to sit on any fillet in the bottom of the bore. Turn or grind it to the lenght for the bottom up and tap a hole in the top so you can pull it out. You should be able to see +-.010 if not use a magnifing glass. Cheap and quick.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    277
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    3

    Default

    I don't know the part but if you can put it onto a CMM it is very simple:

    Input: Measure Plane (Top of part)

    Input: Cone (Measure inside of chamfer)

    Solution: Intersect-Cone to plane. Depending on software, machine should give included angle to.00001 degrees, and diameter at to top to within .000001. (at least on my machine)


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •