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  1. #1
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    Default cheers for the new board section

    One of the things I found before buying my CMM over a year ago is that boards like this one with valuable info by those that use the machines don't seem to exist for CMM's. There are some software boards that deal with individual software's moderated by the software maker - but otherwise is a wasteland of nothing. I know there are a few metrology gurus who frequent the board - I am looking forward to learning in here.

  2. #2
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    Call me stupid and call me ignorant but Co-ordinate measuring machines is only one facet in the metrology jewel.

    Wasn't it a bloke called Demming who said that if you wanted to improve something first you had to be able to measure it.

    Surely Wille, a CMM was bought to enhance your main activities. It sounds like you are very competent in computer controlled machining (cadcam) with a lot of integration occurring.
    Last edited by Damien W; 05-06-2008 at 03:27 PM. Reason: attempt to enhance clarity

  3. #3
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    re-reading the post I may have somewhat implied it.... but I realize a cmm is but one tool in the whole metrology world. Still, ever try to find a totally metrology related message board? that has traffic?

  4. #4
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    A few years ago, maybe ten, laser cutting businesses were rare and high tech and it seemed that fabricators were looking for excuses to give jobs to the very few which existed. Mostly as an experiment to find out what the new machines offered to their products. Now they are a little more numerous and the mystique less, well mystifying.

    Similarly waterjet cutters are increasingly utilised when ten years ago only government in our technology park could afford to own one for experimental and prototype work. As private firms established their waterjets they complained at having to compete against the government owned machine and so the government body was forced to sell their machine.

    If there is any point to this rant could I suggest that maybe 20 years ago when much of the capital machinery in use here was old and worn out business owners were forced to take a very serious look at the future of their enterprises.

    With the many new pressures like metrication, standards, closer tolerances being demanded and new responsibilities of collecting indirect taxes for the government in the form of the Goods and Services tax business owners had to decide if they wanted to compete in this new much more competitive environment.

    Quite a number of business owners chose to retire while a few made a very significant commitment to new technology machine tools and being prepared to challenge the Asian juggernaut for a share of a shrinking local market.

    If you think back ten or twenty years how may machinists would there be who were familiar with computer controlled anything. Okay NC machining was here and there but in the main still relied on punched tape programs.

    So is there a question in this diatribe? One that occurs to me is do you all realise how far we have come in such a short time? Our fathers didn't have to cope with such a revolutionary change in the way their trade was performed or the skills they had to acquire. In my opinion many of the people participating in this forum have had to undergo an extreme learning curve with, I suspect, little help from their employers.

    It's a very different thing to train new machinists in the new technology but quite another to introduce older employees who for decades performed tasks not much differently than the approach that their grandfathers adopted and while working in their trade had to upgrade their skills so significantly.

    Are you coping with the demands of this new manufacturing environment or do you just want to give up and go fishing?
    Last edited by Damien W; 05-06-2008 at 01:55 PM. Reason: spelling/typo correction

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by WILLEO6709 View Post
    Still, ever try to find a totally metrology related message board? that has traffic?
    This one isn't looking too promising at the moment in that regard.....

    Oh well, I will have a few questions about my 1995 Giddings & Lewis Cordax R-5 DCC CMM soon....

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milacron View Post
    This one isn't looking too promising at the moment in that regard.....

    Oh well, I will have a few questions about my 1995 Giddings & Lewis Cordax R-5 DCC CMM soon....
    Patience sir, patience.

  7. #7
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    The words to a song suddenly came into my head, "from little things big things come".

    I hope this applies to this new forum but like the whole site it needs the breath of life that the members' contributions give.

    So roll up, roll up with your questions and answers and hopefully there will be a connection between the two.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Damien W View Post
    A few years ago, maybe ten, laser cutting businesses were rare and high tech and it seemed that fabricators were looking for excuses to give jobs to the very few which existed. Mostly as an experiment to find out what the new machines offered to their products. Now they are a little more numerous and the mystique less, well mystifying.

    Similarly waterjet cutters are increasingly utilised when ten years ago only government in our technology park could afford to own one for experimental and prototype work. As private firms established their waterjets they complained at having to compete against the government owned machine and so the government body was forced to sell their machine.

    If there is any point to this rant could I suggest that maybe 20 years ago when much of the capital machinery in use here was old and worn out business owners were forced to take a very serious look at the future of their enterprises.

    With the many new pressures like metrication, standards, closer tolerances being demanded and new responsibilities of collecting indirect taxes for the government in the form of the Goods and Services tax business owners had to decide if they wanted to compete in this new much more competitive environment.

    Quite a number of business owners chose to retire while a few made a very significant commitment to new technology machine tools and being prepared to challenge the Asian juggernaut for a share of a shrinking local market.

    If you think back ten or twenty years how may machinists would there be who were familiar with computer controlled anything. Okay NC machining was here and there but in the main still relied on punched tape programs.

    So is there a question in this diatribe? One that occurs to me is do you all realise how far we have come in such a short time? Our fathers didn't have to cope with such a revolutionary change in the way their trade was performed or the skills they had to acquire. In my opinion many of the people participating in this forum have had to undergo an extreme learning curve with, I suspect, little help from their employers.

    It's a very different thing to train new machinists in the new technology but quite another to introduce older employees who for decades performed tasks not much differently than the approach that their grandfathers adopted and while working in their trade had to upgrade their skills so significantly.

    Are you coping with the demands of this new manufacturing environment or do you just want to give up and go fishing?
    I was born and raised "up over", so If I go "down under" to go fisning, should
    I bring bobbers instead of sinkers????

    Mike

  9. #9
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    Default Thanks (as well)

    Good to see a forum group here devoted to metrology topics. I hope this will survive and thrive. This is an area that has always interested me, in conjunction with my professional activities (optical metrology instrumentation) and general obsessive compulsive neurosis.

  10. #10
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    There are a few forums dedicated entirely to Metrology.
    This one is dedicated too Metrology as it applies to Machining - mostly dimensional or mechanical measurement.
    I've been working in Metrology since 69, so I've been at a while, and have had experience in all the facets of the business.
    I'm now pretty much focused on microwave test equipment, but still keep abreast of the happenings in our mechanical/dimensional lab.
    I've seen some good posts in here by some more knowledgeable than I, and enjoy reading all of it...
    Keep up the good work, all.

    Only another 30 years, and I might be able to retire...


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