Gauge block handbook.
Close
Login to Your Account
Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Californeeeah
    Posts
    1,481
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    45
    Likes (Received)
    314

    Default Gauge block handbook.

    While searching for techniques of using gauge block, I came across this link. More than you'ld want to know.

    http://ts.nist.gov/MeasurementServic...load/MN180.pdf

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Midlothian, Virginia
    Posts
    2,610
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    70
    Likes (Received)
    225

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Forestgnome View Post
    ... More than you'ld want to know.
    Indeed. Though it is nice to know that the Airy points are 0.577L apart.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Bremerton WA USA
    Posts
    10,659
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    40
    Likes (Received)
    4168

    Default

    Got it! Thanks . I've been looking for something like this as supplemental material to hand out to my classes.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Midlothian, Virginia
    Posts
    2,610
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    70
    Likes (Received)
    225

    Default

    Nice old 1942 Pop Sci article about gauge blocks, with interesting photos:

    http://www.google.com/books?id=2SYDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA108

    Pop Mechanics 1934 article with a picture of Mr. Jo himself:

    http://www.google.com/books?id=yt8DAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA830

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Arizona
    Posts
    3,549
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    769
    Likes (Received)
    467

    Default

    Thanks for posting that! The section on the history of the inch is very interesting. I had no idea that the inch used for land surveying (39.37 inches per meter) was different from the standard inch (25.4 mm per inch, exactly). The difference is about 0.0002%, but I guess that adds up over long distances.

    Cal

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    N.E. oHIo, USA
    Posts
    2,357
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    1371

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cal Haines View Post

    I had no idea that the inch used for land surveying (39.37 inches per meter) was different from the standard inch (25.4 mm per inch, exactly). The difference is about 0.0002%, but I guess that adds up over long distances.

    Cal


    I've been using .03937 as my inch/mm conversion factor for many years. There have been some interesting "discussions" at times where I was told how inaccurate I am for using it.

    I have promised to use 25.4 if I ever build a moon rocket!


    Rex

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    8,201
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    746
    Likes (Received)
    1103

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cal Haines View Post
    ...the inch used for land surveying (39.37 inches per meter) was different from the standard inch (25.4 mm per inch, exactly).
    The NIST Gauge Block Handbook has a good discussion of the inch and meter standards.

    The 39.37 inch/meter conversion factor was adopted in 1866.

    The 1 inch = 25.4 mm factor was adopted in 1959.

    I expect the 1866 inch continues to be used for surveying since all historical work was done using that value.

    - Leigh


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •