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Thread: Haimer repair?

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    Default Haimer repair?

    Anyone ever sent their Haimer 3D-Taster back for repair?
    Apparently you have to have the distributor you bought it from send in a $0 PO, you send in the device to Germany), then they send the estimate back to the distributor who...blah, blah, blah.
    I've already ordered a new one, but wondering if anyone had one repaired and the cost.

    Expensive lesson I guess, I let go of the device before I fully tightened the draw bar, and it slipped out and fell straight down onto the vice about 5 or 6 inches. Of course the probe shattered, but now it dont move the needle at all. Obviously severely "overtraveled".

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    Ouch. Bet that hurt. My Haimer 3D Taster is still working fine after 4 years. A few broken probe tips but so far excellent. I am surprised that you can't ship it directly to them. Let us know what happens.

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    you have no idea! that little divot it left on the part will forever remind me of my stupidity.
    I think I only used it 4 or 5 times

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rubes View Post
    you have no idea! that little divot it left on the part will forever remind me of my stupidity.
    I think I only used it 4 or 5 times
    Remove the indicator dial - there are four tiny grub screws around the edge of it that hold it in, back them off and it will lift out. These four screws are also used to zero the dial when you reassemble it.

    The stylus swivel activates a piston that slides vertically inside the body. There is a small pin that is fixed perpendicular to the plunger shaft of the indicator, this pin engages in a hole in the piston through a narrow slot in the body of the unit.

    You have probably bent or broken this pin, if you're lucky there will be no other significant damage and it'll be an easy fix.

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    Thanx Gregor...I was thinking of opening it up anyway.
    I was even luckier than you indicated.
    The pin did not bend or break at all. something else was causing binding on the plunger shaft of the indicator so the return spring was not returning the plunger back up.
    I simply loosened the screws on the pinion gear bracket and poof, it snapped back up and moves as smooth and free as ever. Reassembled with the pin in the pocket, adjusted the needle to zero with the grub screws as mentioned and looks like I'm back in operation.
    Probably should have tried that before dropping another $400+ on a new one, but more tools is always a good thing, right
    dscf9215.jpg

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    My Haimer 3D Taster works fine but has one issue. There are four grub screws at the top, which are meant to adjust the concentricity, like a true-adjust chuck. This adjustment is not smooth, it is tight/binding, so I can't get the concentricity as good as I like. Before I start taking it apart, has anyone else had this problem? Can anyone suggest a solution? If I don't get any helpful comments, I'll try to take apart the concentricity-adjustor to locate and fix the problem.

    {EDIT]
    I just found a full set of disassembly photos at an Australian woodworking site. You need to register to see the photos, but if you need to fix a 3D Taster, it's probably worth the hassle.

    Cheers,
    Bruce

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    Quote Originally Posted by ballen View Post
    My Haimer 3D Taster works fine but has one issue. There are four grub screws at the top, which are meant to adjust the concentricity, like a true-adjust chuck. This adjustment is not smooth, it is tight/binding, so I can't get the concentricity as good as I like. Before I start taking it apart, has anyone else had this problem? Can anyone suggest a solution? If I don't get any helpful comments, I'll try to take apart the concentricity-adjustor to locate and fix the problem.

    {EDIT]
    I just found a full set of disassembly photos at an Australian woodworking site. You need to register to see the photos, but if you need to fix a 3D Taster, it's probably worth the hassle.

    Cheers,
    Bruce
    Bruce,
    I have to agree that it's not a smooth operation. Especially when you're trying to dial in a tenth. I've always been meaning to take out the screws and put a dab of grease on them, but just don't get around to it.

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    OK, I pulled apart the top part of the Haimer 3D Taster, and now understand why the centering operation was not smooth. The parts are shown below:



    The four steel grub screws bear on an anodized aluminum spigot. In my case, the spigot was badly galled. It would have been better design to have a small hardened steel "bushing" shrunk fit onto the spigot. I filed the galling off the spigot.

    The point is that before adjusting the four grub screws, one must loosen the central bolt that holds the shank onto the body. Once you have the Taster centered as well as possible, tighten up this central bolt.

    (If the central bolt is not loose enough, the shank won't move with respect to the body; the grub screws will simply gall the spigot and if you apply enough pressure, the mounting shank will finally break free and jump over more than you want. That's the behavior I had observed.)

    This process is fussy. You have to remove the Taster from the tool-holder to loosen the central bolt, then put it back in the tool holder, then center, then remove the Taster from the tool-holder again, then resnug the central bolt, then put the Taster back into the tool-holder again. Then check the centering; if it is close, then slightly altering the grub screw pressure will shift the center slightly, even with the central bolt snugged. But if you need more than a few microns of displacement, you need to loosen the central bolt again. And so on.

    Final result is here (video on YouTube). The gradations on the dial indicator are 0.0005" which is a hair more than 0.01 mm.

    I like this tool, but I'm not impressed by the design of the this centering spigot. I had expected better from a German tool company. One of these days I might make a direct-to-SK40 mount. If I do that, I'll extend the mounting spigot inside the tool holder, by attaching it to somewhat larger diameter shaft. That shaft will have an internal angled face, and a grub screw that bears on it. Loosening this grub screw, which is available from outside, will enable the four centering screws to be adjusted. Tightening the grub screw will pull the mounting shaft upwards and lock the location into place. This way, it will be possible to loosen, recenter and tighten the Taster without so much song-and-dance.

    Cheers,
    Bruce

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    I agree about it being a great tool, but seems they dropped the ball on a VERY critical adjustment mechanism.
    Thanks for the lesson and pics!

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    You guys know indicating the tip of the probe is a rough adjustment right? The final adjustment is indicating a ring gauge and actually picking up the hole with the taster. The exact same procedure is used to calibrate a probe except the probe routine enters comp values into the machine variables. This is a pita to do with the taster because your using the four screws. I've only done this on one of the three tasters we have.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Edster View Post
    You guys know indicating the tip of the probe is a rough adjustment right? The final adjustment is indicating a ring gauge and actually picking up the hole with the taster.
    I did not see that step in the manual that I have for the Haimer 3D Taster. The only step shown is centering the probe tip.

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    I didn't now about that recommendation either. I just indicate the ball in with a .0001 indicator and go. The Haimer seems to be just fine doing it that way.

    I do agree the four adjustment screws are a bit sticky to adjust, but I don't think it is a big deal.

    I really like my Haimer 3D Taster. Look on CNC forum to see how I use it to set tools and work.

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    I have THREE of them. ( Plus the one I killed... )Two big un's and one little 'un. Do not buy the electronic, you actually lose resolution.
    I haven't had a single problem dialing them in.. just toss my Starrett .0001" indicator at mid-level on the ball and work the set-screws against each other until the needle stops. 1 axis at a time.
    I love these things. My edge finder still comes out... once in a long while....

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    I thought I'd add one additional note to this thread. A few months ago, I crashed my 3-D Taster for the first time. The sacrificial red ceramic piece on the probe tip broke, which is mean to protect the tool. But because the crash was in the Z-direction, the Taster was damaged: it no longer returned to zero.

    I took it apart and fiddled for a while, before realizing that it was easy to fix. The dial face has four hex-head socket screws around it. If you loosen the bottom two screws, and tighten the top two screws, then this shifts the indicator body inside the taster, and shifts the zero. It's a bit like adjusting a four-jaw lathe chuck. After I realized this, it took five minutes to set everything right, and the Taster is properly zeroed and working again.

    I recently visited an on-line PM friend, his Taster was not zeroed correctly, and he didn't know about this. So perhaps there are others here who don't know it either. If your Taster is not showing dead-nuts zero on the dial, adjust the four screws around the dial face to fix it!

    Cheers,
    Bruce

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    I'm going to dredge this thread back up because I have successfully mashed two brand new tasters into my vise in a 'Z' axis crash and now they no longer read accurately...a very expensive screw up for sure.

    I have taken them apart and seen no obvious damage, but have not disassembled the little geared clock mechanism for fear of shit flying all over.

    In a 'Z' axis crash, does anyone know what exactly is knocked out of whack that causes these things to read .002 off. They are over travel protected so it would seem that the dainty guts wouldn't take a hit. When the probe snaps in a lateral over-travel, the movement swings back to zero with vigor but unit seems to survive, so why does a 'Z' crash kill these so easily.

    Anyone taken the movement apart? The Germans call these Haimer 3D Tasters 'consumables' so factory repair is non existent..not cost effective!

    Stuart

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    There is a thread on here with some pretty good details on taking these apart and fixing them. I don't have time to look for it now but it is on PM. I know the search function sucks on PM so I like to use Google to search PM fo the keywords search needed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by B-Mathews View Post
    There is a thread on here with some pretty good details on taking these apart and fixing them. I don't have time to look for it now but it is on PM. I know the search function sucks on PM so I like to use Google to search PM fo the keywords search needed.
    As a side note a You tuber "NYC CNC" has stickers made that say " It Has been ---- since I broke a Haimer Probe tip". I don't think you're alone on this one.
    Edit Found a link to them It Has Been ___ Days Since I Broke a Haimer Tip (Dry Erase Sticker) – Saunders Machine Works

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    Deleted info

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    Hey Andy...how about starting your own thread as you have a different brand with a different problem..I was hoping to get help on my question.

    Regarding my question..it's not the broken tip that's the problem and I haven't found any thread that deals with anything more than a dial case adjustment for 'nul' or a procedure to zero the device on it's mounting stub. These are not the issue. Both tasters had their probe broken in a direct downward move which now, when a new probe is installed results in a error of about .002 when taking a reading from either side or front to back. 'Z' reads right on the nose.

    Stuart

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    This gentleman disassembled his Haimer to repair. If you take a few minutes to register to this forum you can see all the pics.

    http://www.woodworkforums.com/f65/le...t-lemon-173546

    I jammed my in Z and did not do any damage accept for the tip.


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