How to remove engraving
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  1. #1
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    Default How to remove engraving

    This may not be the proper forum, so please excuse me.

    What is the best way to remove names and initials that are engraved in micrometers and other tooling?

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    Engraved means into the surface. The cure for any such is to REMOVE the surface so affected. So instead of some scrawled letters, etc., you have a big patch of surface missing

    Sounds like a negative gain to me

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    when you become the custodian of a preowned tool, you should never remove the initials of the original owner, you should simply add your initials alongside them, as should their future owners. All things must pass. (old metrologist saying)
    Phil

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    Quote Originally Posted by hermetic View Post
    when you become the custodian of a preowned tool, you should never remove the initials of the original owner, you should simply add your initials alongside them, as should their future owners. All things must pass. (old metrologist saying)
    Phil
    I too like to leave the names of the previous owner in the tools. I often wonder what he might have built using them. Did his parts fly to space? did they fight a war? did he build a machines that shape our infrastructure. A fun diversion at times to wonder abut such things.

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  7. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by hermetic View Post
    when you become the custodian of a preowned tool, you should never remove the initials of the original owner, you should simply add your initials alongside them, as should their future owners. All things must pass. (old metrologist saying)
    Phil
    I agree in principle. However sometimes one encounters a terrible scribble probably done by a troglodyte using a flint. And often there might be some other dents and marks. I must admit that on three or four occasions I did not hesitate to erase marks like this from machinist squares, parallels or similar tools. A few minutes on a surface grinder will bring the tool to like-new condition. But all must be done as not to damage the tool and/or ruin the accuracy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by matra View Post
    I agree in principle. However sometimes one encounters a terrible scribble probably done by a troglodyte using a flint.
    Now that is funny right there!

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    I little OT, but you will get my drift along the way! About 7 years ago, I (acting as site manager, electrical engineer, and general do everything dogsbody ) refurbished and converted a disused chapel in our village, to turn it into a factory for my brothers business www.cambraicovers.com. Whilst doing the finishing and installing some lighting, I found on one of the upper exposed beams the names of everyone who had ever worked on that building, going back to the original builders in the 18oo's.. I encouraged all the craftsmen who worked on it with me to climb the ladder and add their names, and I added mine with a great deal of pride in what we achieved! She is good for another 150 years now! I was going to put some pics up, all on another HDD, I will get them somehow! EDIT, found some on the Cambrai site, all taken by me! Cambrai UK - Aircraft Covers Manufacturers

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    I've been going through this with our tools which are a mix of old family tools, company tools, and stuff we've picked up in between. I agree, original owners names and initials are part of the tools history, but that's not all you run into. We've had a few auction-bought tools from other companies that would engrave inventory numbers into the tool. Not just one number in some cases, but multiple strings of digits all over the tool depending on what the offices dictate.

    It's a case by case thing. In most, I've been able to cover up old data with our own (we number all our tools for inventory and calibration purposes using Dymo printed labels). Some tools will also have a calibration sticker that can cover up old data. If I want to remove info, In some cases I'll use a scotch-bright wheel to polish the surface and kind of fade it all together.

    Ultimately, as John states above, you're removing material, so you have to decide how much to tool means to you and if it might be better to live with the 'damage', or keep an eye out for a replacement.

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    I would not try.
    One can grind it on your surface grinder.
    In which case you may introduce or free unknown stresses.
    Then the question becomes do you have access to the multi-million dollar lab to know distortions in free space?
    I find engraving anything into a mic frame, smaller square or such rather concerning.
    Once done, no matter how bad looking, removing it may be a even worse idea.
    Bob

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    {OT comment removed - TRL}
    Last edited by The real Leigh; 05-18-2019 at 02:43 PM.

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    If names a well engraved by a professional I leave it. Usually if it's badly gouged done on the stain chrome surface like some Starrett micrometers. I have filled the gouges with silver paint as many times as needed to fill the gouges. I then use a flat stone to remove the paint. It's still visible but not as ugly as it was. If on the painted surface I fill the gouges in the paint with a glaze then sand flat and repaint. Name or number completely disappears.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hermetic View Post
    I little OT, but you will get my drift along the way! About 7 years ago, I (acting as site manager, electrical engineer, and general do everything dogsbody ) refurbished and converted a disused chapel in our village, to turn it into a factory for my brothers business www.cambraicovers.com. Whilst doing the finishing and installing some lighting, I found on one of the upper exposed beams the names of everyone who had ever worked on that building, going back to the original builders in the 18oo's.. I encouraged all the craftsmen who worked on it with me to climb the ladder and add their names, and I added mine with a great deal of pride in what we achieved! She is good for another 150 years now! I was going to put some pics up, all on another HDD, I will get them somehow! EDIT, found some on the Cambrai site, all taken by me! Cambrai UK - Aircraft Covers Manufacturers
    Nice looking building and nice that you were able to keep that bit of history alive. I personally dislike the idea that some people have about keeping buildings in a time capsule. Buildings have always been and should be living, changing structures. Keeping the feeling alive but not necessarily every detail. Looks like you did a good job. Thanks for sharing.

    Charles

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